Community and Regional Planning (C R P)

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Any experimental courses offered by C R P can be found at: registrar.iastate.edu/faculty-staff/courses/explistings/

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Courses

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Examination of the evolution of American urban centers from the colonial era to the present. Considers the demographic changes and social movements underway in urban America and explores how an understanding of the history of cities provides us with knowledge that we can use to improve our cities today.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

Cr. 3. F.


Fundamentals of the concepts, models, functions and operations of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Principals of spatial problems, spatial questions and hypotheses and their solutions based on spatial data, GIS tools and techniques. Integration of concepts and applications through lectures and facilitated labs. Applications from a variety of areas including design; physical, social, and human science; engineering; agriculture; business and medicine, landscape architecture, architecture, urban planning, geology, forestry, biology, and ecology.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


World cities and globalization in developed and developing countries. Topics include globalization, world cities and regions, uneven economic development, the international division of labor, multinational corporations, international environmentalism, tourism, popular culture and place- based identity.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(Cross-listed with ENV S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Comprehensive overview of the field of environmental relationships and the efforts being made to organize, control, and coordinate environmental, aesthetic, and cultural characteristics of land, air, and water.

(3-2) Cr. 4. S.

Prereq: STAT 101
An introduction to the methods and analytical techniques used by planners to study community change. Course includes identification of key sources of planning information and data. Students learn to use quantitative methods for analysis of population, land use, economic and transportation data. Students learn to apply basic analytic methods to community problems and learn the art of effective written, graphic, and oral presentation of data.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


An introduction to urban geography. Study of urban centers, including people and infrastructure. Investigation of the origin and evolution of urban areas and the processes that shape urban change. Topics include urban form, and the social, economic, political, cultural, and institutional factors that shape cities.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Major in community and regional planning
Structured work experience under close supervision of a professional planner. Practical planning experience; relationships between theory and practice, professional responsibilities, and the scope of various planning roles.

(2-0) Cr. 2. F.

Prereq: CRP 301 and junior classification
Preparation for working as a planning professional; development of resume and portfolio; discussion of professional ethics and expectations of employers and clients; presentations from planning professionals, and discussion of the range of career choices within the planning profession.

Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: CRP 251X
Intermediate GIS for design and non-design students to learn concepts of digital management and representation of spatial data, including spatial problems, data sources and structures, simple spatial operations and cartographic issues. Gain skill set to effectively display feature and tabular data, query features using logical expressions, edit spatial and attribute data, associate tables with joins and relates, produce maps, reports, and graphs.

(Cross-listed with ECON). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ECON 101
Firm location with respect to regional resources, transport, scale economies, externalities, and policies. Measures of local comparative advantage and specialization. Spatial markets. Population location considering jobs, wages, commuting, and local amenities. Business, residential, and farm land use and value. Migration. Other topics may include market failure, regulation, the product cycle, theories of rural and urban development, developmental policy, firm recruiting, local public goods and public finance, schools, poverty, segregation, and crime.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Junior classification
The nature of planning and its relation to social and economic planning; levels of planning, place of planning in decision making; steps in the planning process, uses and limitation of knowledge in planning, relation of facts and values.

Cr. 1-2. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: CRP major and permission of instructor
Observation of professional practice and community or regional problems and issues. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. R. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Permission of department chair
Approved professional work experience.

(Dual-listed with C R P 516). (3-6) Cr. 6. S.

Prereq: C R P 301
Principles of urban design and their application to residential and commercial development in studio projects.

(Dual-listed with C R P 517). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Junior classification
Planning methods available to further revitalization and preservation efforts, with particular attention to housing and neighborhoods. Relationship between neighborhood change and urban development process; public policy implications.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Investigation of the financial tools and incentives used to promote the rehabilitation and redevelopment of historic buildings and neighborhoods in cities and towns. Study of broader economic and social impacts on communities. Examinations of completed preservation projects around the United States.

(Dual-listed with C R P 529). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Introduction to issues in planning and governance in an international setting. Problems and strategies may include population movement and change, economic globalization, urban growth, rural development, and housing.

(1-6) Cr. 4-6. F.S.

Prereq: C R P 201, C R P 301, C R P 383, or permission of instructor.
Integration of planning methods and theory in dealing with a community planning problem. Analysis of problem and formulation of strategies for implementation. Preparation of a community planning report.

(Dual-listed with C R P 535). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: Junior classification
Contemporary planning problems in small towns and the design of viable strategies to enhance their social and economic position in today's society.

(Dual-listed with C R P 536). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.


The nature and process of economic development in the context of community development. Recent changes and trends and their implications for local and regional development. Selected case studies and applications. Contemporary community economic development issues.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Rationale and need for public participation in community planning and development. Techniques used to garner participation, and the ability to integrate techniques into a broader participatory process. Techniques covered will include public hearings, public meetings, social action construct, advisory committees, scenario building, social media and asset mapping. Students will also work with a community to demonstrate skills learned. None

(Dual-listed with C R P 542). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Introduction to site development including site review. Studio project integrating concept, finance, selection, analysis, and design.

(Dual-listed with C R P 545). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Junior classification; CRP 545 prerequisite: Graduate classification
Comprehensive overview of key policy issues related to transportation planning and investment in the United States and abroad. Policy issues explored include safety, environmental impact, sustainable communities, and economic development. Policy analysis and planning are studied in conjunction with each policy issue explored. Issues of concern to state, metropolitan, and local governments.

(Dual-listed with C R P 549). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: CRP 251 or equivalent or permission of the instructor
Geodesign combines design creativity with scientific thinking based on spatial data. Special focus on sustainable development of future neighborhoods, communities, cities and/or countries. Students learn the geodesign process and implement a set of techniques and technologies that enable project conceptualization, data collection and visualization, spatial analysis, design creation, impact evaluation and stakeholder participation. Final project involves developing cases for analysis using ESRI ArcGIS Online and GeoPlanner software.

(2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.


Introduction to geographic information systems, including discussions of GIS hardware, software, data structures, data acquisition, data conversion, data presentation, analytical techniques, and implementation procedures. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

(Dual-listed with C R P 552). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: C R P 351 or equivalent
Extensive coverage of geo-relational database concept and design, GIS database creation and maintenance, geographic data manipulation and analysis. GIS output generation and geographic data presentation. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

Cr. 3. S.


Introduction to concepts of smart cities. Study of novel technologies for smart governance, sustainable energy, innovative ways for citizens' engagement, improved safety, mobility and healthy living. Examples of national and international smart cities. Living Lab experience.

(Dual-listed with C R P 554). (Cross-listed with L A). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: CRP 351 or equivalent or permission of the instructor
Introduction to remote sensing techniques needed for basic analysis of satellite images, including: filtering and conflation techniques, stacking, pan sharpening, image rectification, image enhancement, unsupervised and supervised classification. Practical applications in a variety of topics to understand how to interpret images.

(Dual-listed with C R P 556). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: CRP 351 or CRP 551 or NREM 345 or NREM 546 or GEOL 552
Introduction to automated geoprocessing in Geographic Information Systems. Focus on learning scripting language and object-oriented programming, automation of custom-designed geoprocessing scripts, and application toward student research and/or interests.

(Dual-listed with C R P 558). (Cross-listed with L A). (2-2) Cr. 3.

Prereq: CRP 451/551, LA 302. GEOL 452/552 or instructor permission.
Use and development of online mapping tools to support participatory GIS, Volunteered Geographic Information, information sharing, geodesign and decision making actions. Geoprocessing and Web Scripting/coding and user interface design. Laboratory emphasis practical applications and uses of Web GIS.

(Dual-listed with C R P 560). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.


Investigation of the topic of social justice as it relates to the challenge of planning more socially just urban societies, emphasizing the importance of social justice issues to planning in a globalized world. Includes a range of issues and case studies of local social justice initiatives, both US and global. Students will complete individual service learning projects as part of the course requirement.

(Dual-listed with C R P 575). (1-0) Cr. 1. F.


A short introduction to effective grant writing for the public and non-profit sectors. Includes identifying appropriate funding sources for an organization, identifying goals and objectives, and budgeting.

(Dual-listed with C R P 579). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Effective management of state and local government finance critical to successful community and regional planning. Economic concepts, topics in budgeting, revenue, expenditure, and financing, analytical techniques, economic impact, and case studies. Understanding of economic assessment in planning and understanding of various linkages between planning and public finance.

(Dual-listed with C R P 584). (Cross-listed with ENV S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Junior classification
The history and theory of sustainable community planning. Procedural and substantive dimensions. Case studies of communities engaged in sustainability planning. Use and development of indicators.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Written approval of instructor and department chair on required form
Investigation of an approved topic commensurate with student's interest and ability. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Written approval of instructor and department chair on required form
Investigation of an approved topic commensurate with student's interest and ability. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(Dual-listed with C R P 591). (Cross-listed with ENV S, L A). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 6 credits in natural sciences
Environmental law and policy as applied in planning at the local and state levels. Brownfields, environmental justice, water quality, air quality, wetland and floodplain management, and local government involvement in ecological protection through land use planning and other programs.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Junior classification
The basis in constitutional, common, and statutory law for the powers of plan implementation. Problems of balancing public and private interests as revealed in the study of leading court cases. Administration of planning agencies and programs.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 2 times. F.S.

Prereq: Senior classification
An advanced forum for seniors that focuses upon recent trends and important issues affecting planning today. Topics addressed will vary. A demonstration of understanding of current issues and their effects upon planning applications is expected.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduates:

Cr. R. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Permission of department chair
Approved professional work experience.

Cr. 3-4. F.

Prereq: Knowledge of GIS helpful but not required.
Principals and methods for researching, identifying, recording, and analyzing buildings, districts, and sites that are historically or architecturally significant. Classroom and fieldwork components will use real-world historic places as case studies.

(Dual-listed with C R P 416). (3-6) Cr. 6. S.

Prereq: C R P 301
Principles of urban design and their application to residential and commercial development in studio projects.

(Dual-listed with C R P 417). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Junior classification
Planning methods available to further revitalization and preservation efforts, with particular attention to housing and neighborhoods. Relationship between neighborhood change and urban development process; public policy implications.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: None
Introduction to the history, theory, and practice of historic preservation and cultural resource management. Cases exploring preservation in US and global contexts; politics of preservation; preservation technologies; and relationship of preservation to other community issues.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in the MRED or instructor permission.
Overview of the real estate development process. Topics include the history of real estate development, roles of planning and market forces in real estate development, and financial management of real estate development. Projects involve analysis of market niches, market penetration rates, lease rates, synergism and tenant mix, and the go/no go decision applied to residential, commercial, and mixed-use development.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in the MRED or instructor permission.
Introduces the central principles of sustainable community design and its implementation in the residential and commercial real estate development sectors. Topics include current practices and regulatory mandates, with a focus on the importance of private participation in the development of sustainable communities.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in the MRED or instructor permission.
Investigation of the financial tools and incentives used to promote the rehabilitation and redevelopment of historic buildings and neighborhoods in cities and towns. Study of broader economic and social impacts on communities. Examinations of completed preservation projects around the United States.

(Dual-listed with C R P 429). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Introduction to issues in planning and governance in an international setting. Problems and strategies may include population movement and change, economic globalization, urban growth, rural development, and housing.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification in Community and Regional Planning
Practical planning experience. Structured work in range of tasks under close supervision of a professional planner. Relationships between theory and practice, exposure to variety of roles in functioning specialties. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(3-6) Cr. 4-6. F.

Prereq: C R P 564 or equivalent
Comprehension and analysis of various geographic contexts pertinent to community planning and the use of planning theory, tools and techniques in an applied setting. Process of making a community plan: historical patterns, current conditions and strategies for planning.

(Dual-listed with C R P 435). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: Junior classification
Contemporary planning problems in small towns and the design of viable strategies to enhance their social and economic position in today's society.

(Dual-listed with C R P 436). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.


The nature and process of economic development in the context of community development. Recent changes and trends and their implications for local and regional development. Selected case studies and applications. Contemporary community economic development issues.

(Dual-listed with C R P 442). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Introduction to site development including site review. Studio project integrating concept, finance, selection, analysis, and design.

(Dual-listed with C R P 445). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Junior classification; CRP 545 prerequisite: Graduate classification
Comprehensive overview of key policy issues related to transportation planning and investment in the United States and abroad. Policy issues explored include safety, environmental impact, sustainable communities, and economic development. Policy analysis and planning are studied in conjunction with each policy issue explored. Issues of concern to state, metropolitan, and local governments.

(Dual-listed with C R P 449). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: CRP 251 or equivalent or permission of the instructor
Geodesign combines design creativity with scientific thinking based on spatial data. Special focus on sustainable development of future neighborhoods, communities, cities and/or countries. Students learn the geodesign process and implement a set of techniques and technologies that enable project conceptualization, data collection and visualization, spatial analysis, design creation, impact evaluation and stakeholder participation. Final project involves developing cases for analysis using ESRI ArcGIS Online and GeoPlanner software.

(Cross-listed with SUS E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: senior or graduate standing.
Major theories and ideas revolving around the concept of resilience. Assessing the social and political processes associated with policy making for resilience. Application of the concept of resilience in order to understand and evaluate environments. Evaluate the different approaches toward resilience and develop an understanding of the relationship between sustainability and resilience. Case studies of communities that proactively prepare for, absorb, recorver from, and adapt to actual or potential future adverse events.

(2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.


Introduction to geographic information systems, including discussions of GIS hardware, software, data structures, data acquisition, data conversion, data presentation, analytical techniques, and implementation procedures. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

(Dual-listed with C R P 452). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: C R P 351 or equivalent
Extensive coverage of geo-relational database concept and design, GIS database creation and maintenance, geographic data manipulation and analysis. GIS output generation and geographic data presentation. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

(2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: C R P 451/C R P 551
Integration of exploratory, participatory and predictive spatial analyses and 3D visualization into the planning process. GIS tools and techniques are used to automate decision analysis and facilitate future planning in analyzing and visualizing planning actions. Laboratory emphasizes practical uses of GIS tools and techniques.

(Dual-listed with C R P 454). (Cross-listed with L A). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: CRP 351 or equivalent or permission of the instructor
Introduction to remote sensing techniques needed for basic analysis of satellite images, including: filtering and conflation techniques, stacking, pan sharpening, image rectification, image enhancement, unsupervised and supervised classification. Practical applications in a variety of topics to understand how to interpret images.

(Dual-listed with C R P 456). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: CRP 351 or CRP 551 or NREM 345 or NREM 546 or GEOL 552
Introduction to automated geoprocessing in Geographic Information Systems. Focus on learning scripting language and object-oriented programming, automation of custom-designed geoprocessing scripts, and application toward student research and/or interests.

(Dual-listed with C R P 458). (Cross-listed with L A). (2-2) Cr. 3.

Prereq: CRP 451/551, LA 302. GEOL 452/552 or instructor permission.
Use and development of online mapping tools to support participatory GIS, Volunteered Geographic Information, information sharing, geodesign and decision making actions. Geoprocessing and Web Scripting/coding and user interface design. Laboratory emphasis practical applications and uses of Web GIS.

(Dual-listed with C R P 460). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.


Investigation of the topic of social justice as it relates to the challenge of planning more socially just urban societies, emphasizing the importance of social justice issues to planning in a globalized world. Includes a range of issues and case studies of local social justice initiatives, both US and global. Students will complete individual service learning projects as part of the course requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Use and development of theory/action relationship in planning practice. Competing normative theories of planning and their evolution, key components and fundamental critiques. Exploration of planning frameworks and approaches, including comprehensive planning; incrementalism; advocacy; communicative rationality; and others.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Focus on the historical role of planning in the shaping of American cities and regions, from the beginning of the Republic to the present. Examine the legacy of planning by exploring the intersection of design, politics and policy. Investigate the factors and the processes that produce the built environment.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Applications of analytical methods in planning with emphasis on the collection, description, analysis, presentation, and interpretation of planning data. Introduction to descriptive statistics. Sources of planning information and data including primary and secondary data types and sources. Demographic analysis, population projection techniques for planning at local and regional levels.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Principles and methods for analyzing community problems and policies including forecasting, efficiency and equity measures, cost/benefit, political feasibility, and sensitivity analysis. Examination of social, political, economic, and environmental values and their manifestation in decision making methods used in planning. Application of tools used to analyze planning problems, project evaluation and public policies.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: C R P 564 or equivalent
Exploration and evaluation of the techniques, processes, and professional skills required to effectively manage land use change at various scales. Land classification systems; land supply and needs inventory for residential uses and commercial and employment centers; capacity and needs analysis for public infrastructure. Includes land use planning project(s) designed to apply the methods explored in this and other courses.

(Dual-listed with C R P 475). (1-0) Cr. 1. F.


A short introduction to effective grant writing for the public and non-profit sectors. Includes identifying appropriate funding sources for an organization, identifying goals and objectives, and budgeting.

(Cross-listed with FIN). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in MRED.
Refinement of students' problem-solving, communication and negotiation skills. Students work on an actual case. Teams will apply knowledge acquired in the classroom to some aspect of a current development on-the-ground and in-process project.

(Dual-listed with C R P 479). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Effective management of state and local government finance critical to successful community and regional planning. Economic concepts, topics in budgeting, revenue, expenditure, and financing, analytical techniques, economic impact, and case studies. Understanding of economic assessment in planning and understanding of various linkages between planning and public finance.

(Dual-listed with C R P 484). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Junior classification
The history and theory of sustainable community planning. Procedural and substantive dimensions. Case studies of communities engaged in sustainability planning. Use and development of indicators.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification and written approval of instructor and department chair on required form

(Dual-listed with C R P 491). (Cross-listed with L A). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 6 credits in natural sciences
Environmental law and policy as applied in planning at the local and state levels. Brownfields, environmental justice, water quality, air quality, wetland and floodplain management, and local government involvement in ecological protection through land use planning and other programs.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


An in-depth analysis of the legal constructs that shape the practice of planning and plan implementation in the United States. An exploration of how land use regulations are applied to reconcile the competing needs and diverse uses of land. The positive and negative consequences of developing and implementing regulatory controls will be addressed.

(1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.

Prereq: 9 credits in GIS Certificate program
Discussion and demonstration of current GIS applications and research in multiple disciplines. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. arr. Repeatable.


Independent planning project with practical application, including research element.

Courses for graduate students:

(1-6) Cr. 4. S.

Prereq: Permission of instructor.
Synthesis and integration of core planning knowledge into professional work in a team setting.

Cr. arr. Repeatable.