English (ENGL)

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Courses

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Study of English for speakers of other languages. Brochure available from the IEOP Office, 102 Landscape Architecture, or at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic reading classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic reading classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic reading classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic reading classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic reading classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic reading classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic writing classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic writing classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic writing classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic writing classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic writing classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic writing classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0. F.S.SS.


Academic writing classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic listening and speaking classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic listening and speaking classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic listening and speaking classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic listening and speaking classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic listening and speaking classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic listening and speaking classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic listening and speaking classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic grammar classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic grammar classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic grammar classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic grammar classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic grammar classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic grammar classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic grammar classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(10-0) Cr. 0.


Academic Skills classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic Orientation classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic Technology classes for speakers of other languages. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Academic English classes for speakers of other languages focusing on Business. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(10-0) Cr. 0.


Academic English classes for speakers of other languages focusing on Business. More information available at www.ieop.iastate.edu.

(5-0) Cr. 0.


Customized academic English and cultural orientation for speakers of other languages.

Cr. 0. F.S.

Prereq: Recommendation of English Department; placement in sections L and R is determined by examination; section S is open to all interested international students. Available P/NP to graduate students at their department's option

Cr. 0. F.S.

Prereq: Recommendation of English Department; placement in sections L and R is determined by examination; section S is open to all interested international students. Available P/NP to graduate students at their department's option

Cr. 0. F.S.

Prereq: Recommendation of English Department; placement in sections L and R is determined by examination; section S is open to all interested international students. Available P/NP to graduate students at their department's option

Cr. 0. F.S.

Prereq: Recommendation of English Department; placement in sections L and R is determined by examination; section S is open to all interested international students. Available P/NP to graduate students at their department's option

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: Recommendation of English Department; placement in various sections is determined by examination. (See English Requirement for International Students in Index.)
For undergraduates: Completion of ENGL 101 requirement prepares students for ENGL 150. For graduates: Completion of ENGL 101 satisfies the English requirement of the Graduate College. ENGL 101 courses are limited to students who are nonnative speakers of English. Credit from ENGL 101 does not count toward graduation.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: Recommendation of English Department; placement in various sections is determined by examination. (See English Requirement for International Students in Index.)
For undergraduates: Completion of ENGL 101 requirement prepares students for ENGL 150. For graduates: Completion of ENGL 101 satisfies the English requirement of the Graduate College. ENGL 101 courses are limited to students who are nonnative speakers of English. Credit from ENGL 101 does not count toward graduation.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: Recommendation of English Department; placement in various sections is determined by examination. (See English Requirement for International Students in Index.)
For undergraduates: Completion of ENGL 101 requirement prepares students for ENGL 150. For graduates: Completion of ENGL 101 satisfies the English requirement of the Graduate College. ENGL 101 courses are limited to students who are nonnative speakers of English. Credit from ENGL 101 does not count toward graduation.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: Recommendation of English Department; placement in various sections is determined by examination. (See English Requirement for International Students in Index.)
Available P/NP to graduate students at their department's option. For undergraduates: Completion of ENGL 101 requirement prepares students for ENGL 150. For graduates: Completion of ENGL 101 satisfies the English requirement of the Graduate College. ENGL 101 courses are limited to students who are nonnative speakers of English. Credit from ENGL 101 does not count toward graduation.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3.


Introduction to the use of linguistic knowledge in computer applications today and the basic computational techniques used in such applications. The development of these techniques throughout the history of computational linguistics. How the study of language has contributed to the advancement of technology and how certain computational problems have influenced the way linguists study language.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in LIB 160 is recommended.
Application of critical reading and thinking abilities to topics of civic and cultural importance. Introduction of basic oral, visual, and electronic communication principles to support writing development. Initiation of communication portfolio.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 2 times. F.S.


Placement based upon OECT test results. Persons whose native language is English cannot take ENGL 180 for credit. No more than one section of ENGL 180 may be taken per semester; up to two sections total. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Credit for ENGL 180 does not apply toward graduation.

Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 2 times. F.S.


Emphasis on pronunciation improvement and greater fluency in spoken English. Placement based upon OECT test results. Persons whose native language is English cannot take ENGL 180 for credit. No more than one section of ENGL 180 may be taken per semester; up to two sections total. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Credit for ENGL 180 does not apply toward graduation.

Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 2 times. F.S.


Placement based upon OECT test results. Persons whose native language is English cannot take ENGL 180 for credit. No more than one section of ENGL 180 may be taken per semester; up to two sections total. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Credit for ENGL 180 does not apply toward graduation.

Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 2 times. F.S.


For students who have completed ENGL 180A or ENGL 180B but have not reached the passing level on the OECT test. Placement based upon OECT test results. Persons whose native language is English cannot take ENGL 180 for credit. No more than one section of ENGL 180 may be taken per semester; up to two sections total. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Credit for ENGL 180 does not apply toward graduation.

Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 2 times. F.S.


Developing explanations, leading discussions and handling questions in a teaching environment. Placement based upon OECT test results. Persons whose native language is English cannot take ENGL 180 for credit. No more than one section of ENGL 180 may be taken per semester; up to two sections total. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Credit for ENGL 180 does not apply toward graduation.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 2 times. F.S.


Seminar with individual observation and consultation. Placement based upon OECT test results. Persons whose native language is English cannot take 180 for credit. No more than one section of ENGL 180 may be taken per semester; up to two sections total. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Credit for ENGL 180 does not apply toward graduation.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Credit in or exemption from 150
Study of selected examples of drama, poetry, short fiction, and the novel drawn from both British and American literature. Recommended for nonmajors.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: Credit in or exemption from 150
Course introduces students to the fundamentals of writing fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Extensive readings in all three genres. Students learn creative processes through writing exercises, workshops, and conferences.

Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: ENGL 150
A broad introduction to the culture of professional work as a technical communicator, with particular emphasis on principles and best practices for developing and managing technical information and digital media. Examination of user-centered design, the history of the discipline, cross-cultural communication, and the ethics of communicating complex information to lay audiences. Study and practice of team-based collaboration, project management, and technical editing.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Introduction to linguistic concepts and principles of linguistic analysis with English as the primary source of data. Sound and writing systems, sentence structure, vocabulary, and meaning. Issues in the study of usage, regional and social dialects, language acquisition, and language change.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Overview of grammatical structures and functions. Parts of speech; phrase, clause, and sentence structure; sentence types and sentence analysis; rhetorical grammar and sentence style; terminology. Not a remedial, English composition, or ESL course.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Representative works of British literature from the origins to 1800 in historical, cultural, and literary contexts. Will include multiple genres.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Representative works from 1800 to the present in historical, cultural, and literary contexts. Will include multiple genres and may include texts that reflect and/or critique the impact and legacy of the British empire on its former colonies, i.e., postcolonial literature.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Representative works of American literature from its origins (including indigenous and conquest literatures) through the end of the Civil War in historical, cultural, and literary contexts. Will include multiple genres.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Representative works written in the United States since the Civil War in historical, cultural, and literary contexts, with attention to the cultural and ethnic diversity of Americans. Will include multiple genres.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Credit in or exemption from 150
A survey of the history of film, both U.S. and international, from the beginnings in the late nineteenth century to the present.

(Cross-listed with AM IN). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Credit in or exemption from ENGL 150
Appreciation of oral and written forms of American Indian literatures. Tropes and techniques in oral, visual and written texts. Focus on the role of American Indians in interdisciplinary approaches to modern social and environmental issues as expressed in literary works.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: ENGL 150 or exemption from ENGL 150; sophomore classification or exemption from ENGL 150; credit for or concurrent enrollment in LIB 160
Analyzing, composing, and reflecting on written, oral, visual, and electronic (WOVE) discourse within academic, civic, and cultural contexts. Emphasis on supporting a claim and using primary and secondary sources. Continued development of communication portfolio.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Exemption from ENGL 150 and admission to Freshman Honors Program; credit for or concurrent enrollment in LIB 160
In-depth analysis, composition, and reflection on written, oral, visual, and electronic (WOVE) discourse within academic, civic, and cultural contexts. Emphasis on argumentation: developing claims, generating reasons, providing evidence. Individual sections organized by special topics. Development of communication portfolio.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Credit in or exemption from 150
Basic principles of literary study. Emphasis on writing of interpretive and critical essays. Particular attention to poetry. Designed for English majors.

(Cross-listed with SP CM). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: Credit in or equivalent of 250
Analysis of how information and entertainment forms persuade and manipulate audiences. Study of several forms that may include newspapers, speeches, television, film, advertising, fiction, and magazines. Special attention to verbal and visual devices.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: ENGL 250, junior classification
Rhetorical concepts and processes to successfully communicate individually and collaboratively via written, oral, visual, and electronic modes across a range of business disciplines. Covers strategies for analyzing audiences internal and external to an organization in order to communicate positive, neutral, and negative messages clearly, completely, correctly, and ethically; save an audience’s time; and create goodwill.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: ENGL 250, junior classification
Theory, principles and processes of effective written, oral, visual, and electronic communication typically encountered in business and the professions. Extensive practice in many areas of workplace communication, including letter, memo, and email correspondence; short proposals and reports; policies and procedures; job packet including letters of application and resumes; website analysis; brochures; and individual and team presentations.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 250, not open to freshmen
Practical workshop in writing nonfiction articles for popular magazines. Emphasis on writing, market research, preparation of manuscripts, methods of submission. Major goal of the course is production of marketable material.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 250, not open to freshmen
Progresses from practice in basic techniques of fiction writing to fully developed short stories. Emphasis on writing, analytical reading, workshop criticism, and individual conferences.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 250, not open to freshmen
Workshop in writing imaginative essays, both critical and personal. Analytical reading, development of literary techniques. Individual and small group conferences.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 250, not open to freshmen
Progresses from traditional to contemporary forms. Emphasis on writing, analytical reading, workshop criticism, and individual conferences.

(Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Writing and reading interpretive fiction written by women. Emphasis on stories that embody a female literary life, gender-specific ways of creating characters and conflicts, analytical reading and writing, workshop criticism and shared commentaries. Includes multi-modal projects.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 250, junior classification
Rhetorical concepts and processes to individually and collaboratively develop proposals for business, governmental, nonprofit, or other organizations and to report on the work completed both orally and in writing. Emphasizes the structure and classification of proposal and report types, qualitative and quantitative research methods, audience analysis, document design, and data visualization.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Fundamental principles of rhetorical criticism. Focus on selected theories for analyzing cultural texts, including essays, speeches, film, technical and scientific documents, and websites. Emphasis on identifying artifacts, formulating research questions, applying methodologies, and understanding and practicing critical analysis through discussion and in writing.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Rhetorical concepts and processes to successfully communicate individually and collaboratively via written, oral, visual, and electronic modes in disciplines in and related to biological sciences. Emphasizes the strategies for analyzing and adapting to audiences in the biological sciences. Covers developing and designing documentation, presenting scientific data visually, and communicating results orally.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Rhetorical principles of multimodal composing in hypertextual environments. Focus on writing according to web style guidelines, employing cascading stylesheets for layout and design, and using principles of information architecture to determine optimal site structure. Final project involves constructing interactive client site using latest web standards.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: ENGL 250, junior classification
Rhetorical concepts and processes to successfully communicate technical information individually and collaboratively via written, oral, visual, and electronic modes. Emphasizes the major strategies for analyzing expert and lay audiences and adapting information to those audiences. Covers developing and designing usable technical documentation, visualizing data, and presenting technical information orally.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: ENGL 250, junior classification
Theories, principles, and processes of effective written, oral, visual, and electronic communication of technical information. Attention to major strategies for analyzing and adapting to audiences in various communication situations and composing technical discourse including organizing visual and verbal information. Extensive practice in many areas of technical communication, including instructions and procedures, proposals and reports, website analysis and design, and individual and team presentations.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: ENGL 250, not open to freshmen
Stresses master scene technique of writing fully developed screenplays. Emphasis on movie techniques, writing, workshop criticism, analytical reading and viewing, and individual conferences.

(Cross-listed with THTRE). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 250, not open to freshmen
Progresses from production of scenes to fully developed one-act plays. Emphasis on action, staging, writing, analytical reading, workshop criticism, and individual conferences.

(Cross-listed with LING). Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL/LING 219
Introduction to variation in language use in society. Survey of factors affecting language use, including background characteristics of language users, location, and purpose of interaction in addition to institutional, state, and national language policies.

(Cross-listed with LING). Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: ENGL/LING 219
Introduction to the issues and methods involved in teaching literacy skills to English as a second language (ESL) learners. The nature of literacy and materials and methods for developing ESL literacy at the middle school, high school, and adult ages across multiple levels of competency.

(Cross-listed with LING). Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL/LING 219
Issues and methods in teaching oral communication skills (listening, speaking, pronunciation) to English as a second language (ESL) learners. The nature of oral language ability. Materials and Methods for developing oral communication skills at middle school, high school, and adult contexts.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Study of science fiction from its origins in nineteenth-century to the present. May include study of specific types of science fiction, such as classic, cyberpunk, feminist, or apocalyptic narratives; and may include consideration of science fiction film and/or theory.

(Cross-listed with STAT). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: STAT 101, STAT 104, STAT 201 or STAT 226; ENGL 250
Communicating quantitative information using visual displays; visualizing data; interactive and dynamic data displays; evaluating current examples in the media; color, perception, and representation in graphs; interpreting data displays.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Principles of film art and the traditional vocabulary of literature as applied to film. Influence of film on modes of thought and behavior.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 260 and 3 additional credits in literature
Study of selected texts of literary criticism, with attention to the purposes and practices of criticism.

(Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Historical and thematic survey of literature by and about women. May include autobiographies, journals, letters, poetry, fiction, and drama.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with AM IN, W S). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Literature of American Indian women writers which examines their social, political, and cultural roles in the United States. Exploration of American Indian women's literary, philosophical, and artistic works aimed at recovering elements of identity, redescribing stereotypes, resisting colonization, and constructing femininity.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with US LS). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 250
An introduction to the literature of Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and other Latino/a sub-groups. Special emphasis on themes such as ethnic relations and comparisons with EuroAmerican literary traditions.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Literature by women and/or dealing with the images of women, e.g., study of individual authors or related schools of authors; exploration of specific themes or genres in women's literature; analysis of recurrent images of women in literature.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with AM IN). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Survey of literature by Native Americans from pre-Columbian tales and songs to contemporary novels and poetry.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with AF AM). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Literature by African Americans, which may include study of individual authors, movements, themes, genres.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Literature by writers from U.S. multicultural groups. May include literature of several groups or focus upon one of the following: Asian Americans, African Americans, Latino/a Americans, American Indians.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with CL ST, SP CM). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Ideas about the relationship between rhetoric and society in contemporary and historical contexts. An exploration of classical and contemporary rhetorical theories in relation to selected topics that may include politics, gender, race, ethics, education, science, or technology.

(Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Literary portrayals of gay and lesbian lives and relationships from many different genres. Attention to changing definitions and representations of sexual orientation and gender identity over time.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with CL ST). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Representative works from the drama, epics, poetry, and prose of the Ancient World through the late sixteenth century. May include Homer, Aeschylus, Sappho, Catullus, Dante, Marie de France, Boccaccio, Christine de Pizan, Cervantes, and others.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Global literatures in their various cultural and aesthetic contexts. Representative works, oral and written literature, including poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(Cross-listed with ENV S). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Study of literary texts that address the following topics, among others: the relationship between people and natural/urban environments, ecocriticism, and the importance of place in the literary imagination.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Study of traditional fairytales, myths, and legends from diverse cultures.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 250; sophomore classification
Selected readings in American literature from its beginnings through the colonial period; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 250; sophomore classification
Selected readings in American literature of the 19th century; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 250; sophomore classification
Selected readings in American literature since 1900; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Reading and analysis of selected plays. Development of Shakespeare's dramatic art in its social and intellectual context.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 250; sophomore classification
Selected readings in medieval literature from its beginnings through the fifteenth century; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 250; sophomore classification
Selected readings in British literature from 1660 to 1800; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 250; sophomore classification
Selected readings from British literature from the late eighteenth century to about 1900; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250; sophomore classification
Selected readings from British literature from the late eighteenth century to about 1900; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250; sophomore classification
Selected readings from British literature from the late eighteenth century to about 1900; may reflect themes, genres, or social and cultural contexts.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 250; sophomore classification
Historical, thematic and theoretical study of postcolonial literatures from one or more of the following areas: Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean, and the Middle East. Irish and immigrant British writers may also be included.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Origin and development of English and American children's literature through the early twentieth century. Special emphasis on nature, structure, and enduring themes of fantasy literature.

Cr. arr. SS.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. arr. SS.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. arr. SS.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. arr. SS.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. arr. SS.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. arr. SS.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 250
Critical study and evaluation of themes, genres, and cultures found in young adult literature. Strategies of effective reading; instructional strategies including discussion techniques and use of technology; matching texts to reader needs and proficiencies. Evaluation of fiction, nonfiction, and media-based materials for use in school programs. Lesson planning.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 219 or ENGL 220; application process initiated for admission to university teacher education program; concurrent enrollment in C I 280 (cr. 2); and background check initiated with state of Iowa Department of Criminal Investigation
Introduction to teaching secondary language arts. Current theories and practices in the teaching of writing to secondary school students. Theories of rhetoric, approaches to teaching, lesson design and planning. Evaluating writing. Professional portfolio preparation.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 304
Individual projects in short fiction on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in short fiction. Discussion of elements of narrative such as plot, point of view, characterization, theme, setting.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 305
Individual projects in memoir, immersion journalism, character studies, and/or the personal essay on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in creative nonfiction.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 306
Individual projects in poetry on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in poetry. Discussion of poetic elements such as image, sound, internal structure, rhythm, tone, figurative language.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 310; ENGL 302, ENGL 309, ENGL 313, or ENGL 314; junior classification
Seminar course on the implication of technologies, especially computer technology, for the writing and reading of business, technical, and academic texts. Extensive reading, discussion, and writing on selected technology-related topics.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 302, ENGL 309, or ENGL 314; junior classification
Editing concepts and processes for choosing the appropriate level of editing for the particular rhetorical situation. Covers using editorial tools such as copy-marking symbols, developing style sheets and guides, and managing document production. Emphasizes developing an editorial eye for verbal and visual details in order to achieve accuracy, consistency, correctness, and completeness.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: ENGL 302, ENGL 309, or ENGL 314; junior classification
Rhetorical strategies and perceptual principles for designing print and digital visual elements such as diagrams and graphs and integrating those visual elements into business and technical communications. Covers strategies for employing visual elements such as typeface, page and screen layout, and illustrations in order to make communications more usable.

Cr. arr. F.S.

Prereq: admission to teacher education, approval of coordinator the semester prior to student teaching
Full-time teaching in content licensure area: long term and unit planning, lesson planning, classroom teaching practice.

(Cross-listed with C I). Cr. arr. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 494, admission to teacher education, approval of coordinator the semester prior to student teaching
Full-time teaching in secondary English: long term and unit planning, lesson planning, classroom teaching practice in English language arts.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 310, junior classification
Advanced seminar in theory and analysis with extensive practice in various modes of argument.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 219 or LING 219, ENGL 220 or LING 220
Comparison of English to other languages by family background and by type. Analysis of representative Old, Middle, Early Modern and present-day English texts, including both literary works and non-literary documents.

(Cross-listed with LING, W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 219 or LING 219
The ways men and women differ in using language in varied settings and the ways in which language both creates and reflects gender divisions.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 219 or LING 219; junior classification
The process of second language learning and principles and techniques of teaching second languages. Learning and teaching in specific situations and for particular purposes. Current applications of technology in teaching and assessment.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: ENGL 220 or LING 220; ENGL 219 or LING 219 or introductory course in linguistics; junior classification
Theories and methods for analysis of syntax and morphology.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of surveys; completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 339; junior classification
Selected authors, movements, eras, or genres in British literature. Readings in criticism; required research paper.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of surveys; completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 339; junior classification
Selected authors, movements, eras, or genres in American literature. Readings in criticism; required research paper.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of surveys; completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 339; junior classification
Intensive study of selected literature that bridges traditional genre, period, national, or disciplinary boundaries. Readings in criticism; required research paper.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of surveys; completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 339; junior classification
Intensive study of drama, film, fiction, poetry, or prose. Selected movements, eras, or national traditions. Readings in criticism; required research paper.

(Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Completion of 9 credits of surveys; completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 339; junior classification
Selected readings of various authors, movements, eras, or genres. Readings in criticism; required research paper.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 302, ENGL 309, or ENGL 314
Intensive study of a selected topic that bridges theory and practice in technical communication. Required project that contributes to the understanding of an emerging issue in the profession.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 9 credits in ENGL 302, ENGL 309, ENGL 313, ENGL 314, ENGL 415 (preferred), ENGL 416, or ENGL 477; junior classification; and permission of coordinator
An opportunity to write, edit, and design business and technical documents in a professional setting. Projects might include reports, proposals, manuals, brochures, newsletters.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond ENGL 250 appropriate to the section taken, junior classification, permission of Undergraduate Studies Committee
Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study in areas other than those in which courses are offered. No more than 9 credits of ENGL 490 may be used toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond ENGL 250 appropriate to the section taken, junior classification, permission of Undergraduate Studies Committee
Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study in areas other than those in which courses are offered. No more than 9 credits of ENGL 490 may be used toward graduation.

(Cross-listed with LING). Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond ENGL 250 appropriate to the section taken, junior classification, permission of Undergraduate Studies Committee or Linguistics Adviser
Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study in areas other than those in which courses are offered. No more than 9 credits of ENGL 490 may be used toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond ENGL 250 appropriate to the section taken, junior classification, permission of Undergraduate Studies Committee
Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study in areas other than those in which courses are offered. No more than 9 credits of ENGL 490 may be used toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond ENGL 250 appropriate to the section taken, junior classification, permission of Undergraduate Studies Committee
Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study in areas other than those in which courses are offered. No more than 9 credits of ENGL 490 may be used toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond ENGL 250 appropriate to the section taken, junior classification, permission of Undergraduate Studies Committee
Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study in areas other than those in which courses are offered. No more than 9 credits of ENGL 490 may be used toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond ENGL 250 appropriate to the section taken, junior classification, permission of Undergraduate Studies Committee
Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study in areas other than those in which courses are offered. No more than 9 credits of ENGL 490 may be used toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond ENGL 250 appropriate to the section taken, junior classification, permission of Undergraduate Studies Committee
Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study in areas other than those in which courses are offered. No more than 9 credits of ENGL 490 may be used toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond ENGL 250 appropriate to the section taken, junior classification, permission of Undergraduate Studies Committee
Designed to meet the needs of students who wish to study in areas other than those in which courses are offered or who desire to integrate a study of literature or language with special problems in major fields. No more than 9 credits of ENGL 490 may be used toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 9 credits in English beyond ENGL 250 appropriate to the section taken, junior classification, permission of Undergraduate Studies Committee
Teaching assistant experience.

Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 304, ENGL 305, or ENGL 306 and junior standing
Advanced workshop of individual creative writing projects in short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Readings and discussion of published examples of short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry by authors of national and international note. Extensive discussion and written analysis of elements of craft across genres.

(Cross-listed with C I). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: ENGL 310, ENGL 397, 9 other credits in English beyond ENGL 250, PSYCH 333, admission to teacher education program
Portfolio review. Current theories and practices in the teaching of literature to secondary school students. Integrating literary study and writing. Preparation and selection of materials. Classroom presentation. Unit planning. (Taken concurrently with C I 280, Cr. 2, and Sp Ed 450).

Cr. 1. F.S.

Prereq: Junior status
Must be taken in conjunction with a 400-level English course.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduates:

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Graduate classification; must be teaching ENGL 150 or ENGL 250 concurrently
Required of all new English Department teaching assistants teaching ISUComm Foundation Courses. Introduction to the teaching of ISUComm Foundation Courses. Foundational and relevant newer composition theory and pedagogical methods related to ISUComm Foundation Courses objectives and their classroom enactment, including development of assignments and supporting activities, and evaluation of student projects.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 graduate credits in English
Survey of the major rhetorical, qualitative, and quantitative methods used in research on communication and language in academic and nonacademic settings.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 graduate credits in English
In-depth consideration of the theory and practice of composition pedagogy. Opportunities for actual classroom application.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Teaching business and technical communication in university, community college, and industry settings. Emphasizes curriculum planning, materials development, assignment design, responding to student work, assessment of student work, and distance (online) teaching.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Seminar course examining user experience (UX) interface design and development in technical communication. Focus is on the UX project cycle: creating userfaces, conducting user research, system testing, and implementing data-driven results.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Admission to English Department graduate degree program
Introduction to professional communication as a discipline, with emphasis on theories of communication and discourse that inform professional communication research and on trends and developments in that research and the field.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: 6 graduate credits
Hands-on practice in writing academic discourse for publication; rhetorical analyses of student-selected academic journals; discussion of current trends in academic writing; professional perspectives on the referee process and on journal editorial decision making. Focus on the writing of selected short pieces (opinion essays, standard reviews, conference-length papers) and of article-length manuscripts.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Use of software and web applications for language teaching, linguistic analysis, and statistical analysis. Issues and problems in applied linguistics related to computer methods.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Principles and methods of linguistic analysis with emphasis on phonology, morphology, and syntax. Description of linguistic variation and current theoretical approaches to linguistics.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or an introductory course in linguistics
Theory, methods, and results of second language acquisition research with emphasis on approaches relevant to second language teaching.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: ENGL 519 or LING 519
Advanced practicum in language assessment.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or an introductory course in linguistics
Theories and methods of examining language in its social setting. Analysis of individual characteristics (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, social class, region), interactional factors (e.g., situation, topic, purpose) and national policies affecting language use.

(Cross-listed with HCI, LING). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: STAT 330 or equivalent, recommended ENGL 219 or LING 219, or ENGL 511 or LING 511
Introduction to computational techniques involving human language and speech in applications such as information retrieval and extraction, automatic text categorization, word prediction, intelligent Web searching, spelling and grammar checking, speech recognition and synthesis, statistical machine translation, n-grams, POS-tagging, word-sense disambiguation, on-line lexicons and thesauri, markup languages, corpus analysis, and Python programming language.

Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: ENGL/LING 219 or equivalent.
Data and knowledge structures for formal representation of natural language and speech data. Designing and implementing algorithms for automating linguistic analysis tasks. Conceptual issues for natural language and speech processing programming.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or an introductory course in linguistics
Introduction to approaches, methods, techniques, materials, curricular design, and assessment for various levels of ESL instruction. Attention to issues related to the teaching of listening, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, pronunciation, and culture.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511
Principles of second language assessment including reliability, validity, authenticity and practicality. Constructing, scoring, interpreting, and evaluating second language tests for a variety of situations.

(Cross-listed with HCI, LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: ENGL 510 or LING 510, and ENGL 511 or LING 511
Concepts and practices for analysis of English by computer with emphasis on the applications of computational analysis to problems in applied linguistics such as corpus analysis and recognition of learner language in computer-assisted learning and language assessment.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Examination of the roles of the literary work, reader, and teacher in literary study. Responses to literature. Place of literature in language arts. Study and development of curriculum materials for middle school, high school, and college levels of instruction.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Examination of the history, logic, and rhetoric of contemporary literary criticism and analysis.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Course in medieval literature or history or history of the English language recommended
Introductory study of Old English language and literature in prose and poetry, including extracts from Beowulf. Some attention to Anglo-Saxon culture.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or an introductory course in linguistics
Theoretical and practical issues and techniques in the teaching of literacy in a variety of contexts, involving children and adults at basic skill levels and teens and adults in academic and vocational programs.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or an introductory course in linguistics
Theoretical and practical issues and techniques in the teaching of second language pronunciation as it relates to other areas of language, especially listening and speaking skills. Topics will include segmental and suprasegmental features; intelligibility; pronunciation in language assessment; classroom, technology and individual instruction; and research issues. Topics will be relevant to those intending to teach or research in various contexts.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or equivalent
Theory, research, and practice in computer use for teaching nonnative speakers of English. Methods for planning and evaluating computer-based learning activities.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or an introductory course in linguistics
Methods and theoretical foundations for linguistic approaches to discourse analysis. Applications of discourse analysis to the study of texts in a variety of settings, including academic and research contexts.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or an introductory course in linguistics
Issues and techniques in analyzing, teaching, and assessing English for specific purposes. Topics include theories of specific purpose language use, analysis of learner needs in target language contexts, and corpus-informed syllabus and materials development for teaching and assessment.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 313
Strategies for developing and delivering multimodal content via digital media. Focus on the principles of database design, interface development, usability testing, and collaborative content management within professional communication settings.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Intensive study of literary genres, periods, movements, or themes; e.g., Literature and Historicism, Narrating the Feminine, Allegory.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Selected texts in American literature from Beginnings to the Civil War. Study may include Native American literature, the literature of European conquest, Colonial and Revolutionary periods, Early Republic, and Jacksonian Era, in critical and cultural contexts.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Selected texts from the Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration, Eighteenth-Century, and/or Romantic periods, in critical and cultural contexts.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Selected texts in American literature from the Civil War to the present. Study may include Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism, with significant attention to race/ethnicity, gender, and identity, and to contemporary critical views. Range of authors and genres.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Selected texts from the Victorian, Edwardian, Modernist, and/or Contemporary periods, in critical and cultural contexts.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 220 or LING 220; ENGL 219, LING 219, ENGL 511, LING 511, or introductory course in linguistics; graduate classification
Corpus-informed analysis of syntax in authentic writing and speech, with emphasis on approaches used in applied linguistics.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Selected fiction writers in English; range of authors and genres. Emphasis on both male and female writers; attention to the relationships between fiction and cultural change.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Selected poets writing in English, considered in representative groups.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Primary texts in dramatic genres from various literary periods, in critical and cultural contexts. Frequently concentrates on the English Renaissance and the Shakespearean stage.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Study of lifewriting, e.g., autobiography, biography, memoir, cross-genre writing, autobiographical criticism. Readings may be arranged by period, nationality, or subgenre (e.g., autobiography of childhood experience, celebrity auto/biography).

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Senior classification
Overview of the principles of desktop publishing as practiced in the field of technical communication. Focus on theories of print document design and project management, as well as digital prepress techniques employed to produce documents using external print services. Requires extensive use of current desktop publishing software.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Intensive study of environmental literary genres, periods, figures, movements, or themes: e.g., Ecofeminism, Imagining Natural Disaster, Material Ecocriticism, Environmental Justice, Posthumanism.

(Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Primary texts by women writers; historical, thematic, formal, or theoretical approaches; secondary readings; e.g., Nineteenth-Century Women Writers; American Women's Personal Narratives; Southern Women Writers of the U.S.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification or 6 credits in literature at 300 level or above
Intensive study of current and emerging topics and problems concerning literature and its relationship to theory and to language study; e.g., Theory of Metaphor; Renegotiating the Canon; Feminist Theory.

(Cross-listed with SP CM). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in English
Rhetorical theory from the classical period of ancient Greece and Rome through the Middle Ages to the early Renaissance; attention to its relation to the nature of knowledge, communication, practice, and pedagogy.

(Cross-listed with SP CM). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in English
Rhetorical theory from the early modern period (Bacon, Descartes, and Locke) to the present; attention to its relation to the nature of knowledge, communication practice, and pedagogy.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Senior classification
Rhetorical principles of interactive multimedia design, such as those in DVDs, Blu-Ray videos, and streaming web multimedia. Practical understanding of computer applications used in interactive multimedia development. Focus on theoretical and practical elements of producing multimedia training in both education and industry. Work with interactive hypertext, digital audio, and nonlinear video editing.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Admission into MFA Program in Creative Writing and Environment
A multigenre craft course required of all incoming students in the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Environment. Students develop an understanding of craft and environmental writing across genres (poetry, fiction, nonfiction) as well as learn about editing and publication practice through the lens of a working literary journal, "Flyway: A Journal of Writing and Environment." Other course activities include presentations on the production practices of leading literary journals, individual editing projects, pragmatic tips for finding publication outlets for polished creative work, and a field trip to publishing houses.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Fifth-semester or equivalent standing in the Creative Writing and Environment MFA program
An advanced multigenre creative writing workshop. Students work intensively on book-length manuscripts of fiction, creative nonfiction, scriptwriting, or poetry.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 12 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 550 and graduate classification. Open to graduate students outside MFA in Creative Writing and Environment with permission of instructor
Individual projects in fiction on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in short fiction. Discussion of elements of narrative such as plot, point of view, characterization, theme, setting.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 12 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 550 and graduate classification. Open to graduate students outside MFA in Creative Writing and Environment with permission of instructor
Individual projects in memoir, immersion journalism, character studies, and/or the personal essay on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in creative nonfiction.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 12 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 550 and graduate classification. Open to graduate students outside MFA in Creative Writing and Environment with permission of instructor
Individual projects in poetry on a workshop and conference basis. Readings in poetry. Discussion of poetic elements such as image, sound, internal structure, rhythm, tone, figurative language.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 12 credits.

Prereq: Graduate classification. Open to graduate students outside MFA in Creative Writing and Environment with permission of instructor.
Special topics course on ideas, issues, and techniques in creative writing. Subject matter may include specific genres, aspects of the creative writing process, or themes of particular interest. Significant readings and written work required; previous workshop experience helpful.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Pedagogical approaches that are effective for grade-school through adult-education creative writing teaching. Writing exercises, workshops, text evaluation, and visits from creative writers.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of participating instructors
Students assist in an introductory creative writing class. Some supervised teaching but mainly evaluation of submissions and individual conferences. Requirements and grades determined by participating instructors.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: ENGL 550 and graduate classification. Open to graduate students outside MFA in Creative Writing and Environment with permission of instructor
Students spend a term on a project that requires fieldwork. Projects might include working for a federal, state, or private non-profit environmental organization or farm, or living and working in a specified natural area.

Cr. 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification or permission from the instructor
Intensive study of research methods and perspectives concerning the study of literature and the humanities at the master’s level. Introduction to resources and techniques of research, the structure of academic articles, and strategies for argument in academic communication.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: A course in professional communication
Rhetorical theory and research in graphics, document design, and related principles of visual communication. Methods of designing texts, data displays, illustrations, and other visual elements in business and technical communication.

(3-0) Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: ENGL 507 plus 3 additional graduate credits in business and technical writing or composition and rhetoric, permission of instructor. Limited to master's and doctoral degree candidates in the field of rhetoric and professional communication
An opportunity to write, edit, and design business and technical documents in a professional setting.

(Cross-listed with LING). (1-5) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 9 credits toward the TESL/TEFL Certificate, 15 credits toward the TESL/AL master's degree, or 18 credits completed toward the ESL Endorsement option.
Intensive observation of ESL instruction and supervised practice in teaching learners of English in a context appropriate to the student teacher's goals. ENGL 588 cannot be used for teacher licensure and cannot be taken during student teaching.

(3-0) Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: ENGL 550 and permission of instructor
An opportunity to edit literary texts and gain experience in a literary publishing setting.

(Cross-listed with LING). Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of the Director of Graduate Education according to guidelines available online

Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of the Director of Graduate Education according to guidelines available online

(Cross-listed with LING). Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of the Director of Graduate Education according to guidelines available online

Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of the Director of Graduate Education according to guidelines available online

Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of the Director of Graduate Education according to guidelines available online

Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of the Director of Graduate Education according to guidelines available online

(Cross-listed with LING). Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of the Director of Graduate Education according to guidelines available online

Cr. arr. Repeatable.


(Cross-listed with LING). Cr. arr. Repeatable.


(Cross-listed with SP CM). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits.

Prereq: 12 credits in rhetoric, linguistics, or literature, excluding ENGL 150 and ENGL 250
Seminar on topics central to the fields of rhetoric and professional communication or composition.

(Cross-listed with SP CM). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits.

Prereq: 12 credits in rhetoric, linguistics, or literature, excluding ENGL 150 and ENGL 250
Seminar on topics central to the fields of rhetoric and professional communication or composition.

(Cross-listed with SP CM). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits.

Prereq: 12 credits in rhetoric, linguistics, or literature, excluding ENGL 150 and ENGL 250
Seminar on topics central to the fields of rhetoric and professional communication or composition.

(Cross-listed with SP CM). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits.

Prereq: 12 credits in rhetoric, linguistics, or literature, excluding ENGL 150 and ENGL 250
Seminar on topics central to the fields of rhetoric and professional communication or composition.

Cr. arr.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.

Cr. arr.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.

Cr. arr.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.

Cr. arr.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.

Cr. arr.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.

Cr. arr.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Supervised study of an appropriate area of the discipline while traveling in a foreign country or in the U.S. Special fees apply.

Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification, permission of major professor

Courses for graduate students:

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENGL 501
A workshop for advanced graduate students in rhetoric and professional communication. Focus on rhetorical analysis, qualitative methods, or quantitative methods.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: ENGL 501
A workshop for advanced graduate students in rhetoric and professional communication.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: ENGL 501
A workshop for advanced graduate students in rhetoric and professional communication.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 501
Extended practice in close textual analysis of various kinds of rhetorical artifacts. Attention to important theoretical concepts used in rhetorical analysis and to historical controversies over the scope and function of rhetorical analysis.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 503
Exploration of relationships between theory and practice in current pedagogy. Intensive examination of contemporary theories of poststructuralism, new media, feminism, postcolonialism, or cultural studies and their impact on current pedagogical practice. Participation in pedagogical research and theory building.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable.

Prereq: ENGL 547 or ENGL 548
Rhetorical theory, criticism, and/or practice in relation to an historical period or a particular theoretical issue.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511, ENGL 517 or LING 517, ENGL 519 or LING 519
Survey of research traditions in applied linguistics. Focus on theoretical and practical aspects of quantitative and qualitative approaches to applied linguistic study, including experimental and quasiexperimental methods, classroom observation and research, introspective methods, elicitation techniques, case studies, interactional analysis, ethnography, and program evaluation. Computational tools and resources for linguistic research will be highlighted.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: ENGL 510 or LING 510, ENGL 511 or LING 511, ENGL 519 or LING 519
Principles and practice for the use and study of computers and the Internet in second language assessment.

(Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable.

Prereq: ENGL 510 or LING 510, ENGL 511 or LING 511
Topic changes each semester. Topics include advanced methods in natural language processing, technology and literacy in a global context, feedback in CALL programs, technology and pronunciation, and advances in language assessment.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ENGL 500, ENGL 503, ENGL 504, or ENGL 603
Survey of the major components of writing instruction in academic and nonacademic settings. History, theory, organization, and evaluation of writing programs. Guided observation of writing program functions at various institutions and businesses.

(Cross-listed with LING). (1-5) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: ENGL 510 or LING 510, ENGL 626 or LING 626, or equivalent; at least 2nd year PhD student in Applied Linguistics and Technology
Focus on integrating theoretical knowledge with practical expertise. Assess client needs; develop, integrate, and evaluate solutions. Practical understanding of computer applications used in multimedia development. Create web-based or CD-ROM-based multimedia materials. Work with advanced authoring applications.

Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduate classification, permission of major professor
Research.