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Environmental Science

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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Interdepartmental Undergraduate Programs

Environmental Science provides an integrated, quantitative, and interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental systems. The magnitude and complexity of environmental problems are creating a growing need for scientists with rigorous, interdisciplinary training in environmental science. The Environmental Science program is designed to prepare students for positions of leadership in this rapidly changing discipline. Environmental Science graduates have a solid foundation in biological and physical natural sciences and the specialized training necessary for integrated analysis of environmental systems.

Undergraduate Study

The Environmental Science undergraduate major is offered through both the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Environmental Science majors complete foundation courses in biology, chemistry, earth science, geology, physics and mathematics, plus a major consisting of an integrated core of Environmental Science courses and additional advanced course work in Environmental Science. Scientific rigor is stressed throughout the program, beginning with the foundation courses in the first two years of the curriculum. The upper level core courses emphasize a dynamic systems approach that provides a framework for integrating physical, chemical, and biological aspects of environmental systems.

Students seeking an Environmental Science major complete the following:

1. A foundation of approved supporting courses in science and mathematics including biology, chemistry, earth science, physics, calculus, and statistics.

2. 32 credits of course work in the major, including a required core of 20 credits.

A combined average grade of C or higher is required in courses applied in the major.

1. Environmental Science: 32 credits

ENSCI 110Orientation to Environmental Science1
ENSCI 201Introduction to Environmental Issues2
ENSCI 202Exploration of Environmental and Sustainability Issues1
ENSCI 203Exploration of Environmental Science1
ENSCI 250Environmental Geography3
ENSCI 251Biological Processes in the Environment3
ENSCI 381Environmental Systems I: Introduction to Environmental Systems3
ENSCI 382Environmental Systems II: Analysis of Environmental Systems3
ENSCI 384Introduction to Ecosystems3
Additional ENSCI choice courses12
Total Credits32

2. Mathematics & Statistics: 7-8 credits

Choose one of the following:4
Survey of Calculus
Calculus I
Calculus and Mathematical Modeling for the Life Sciences I
Choose one of the following:3-4
Principles of Statistics
Introduction to Statistics
Total Credits7-8

3. Physical & Life Sciences: 21-24 credits

BIOL 101Introductory Biology3
or BIOL 211 Principles of Biology I
Choose from one of the following:5-6
College Chemistry
and Laboratory in College Chemistry
General Chemistry for Engineering Students
and Laboratory in General Chemistry for Engineering
General Chemistry I
and Laboratory in General Chemistry I
Advanced General Chemistry
and Laboratory in Advanced General Chemistry
Choose from one of the following:3-4
Elementary Organic Chemistry
and Laboratory in Elementary Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry I
and Laboratory in Organic Chemistry I
Structure and Reactions in Biochemical Processes
Organic Compounds in Plants and Soils
Choose from one of the following:4-5
General Physics
Physics for the Life Sciences
Introduction to Classical Physics I
Choose 2 of the following:6
Introduction to Soil Science
The Earth
Geology for Engineers and Environmental Scientists
Introduction to Weather and Climate
Principles of Biology II
General Chemistry II
and Laboratory in College Chemistry II
Total Credits21-24

4. Communications: 7-10 credits

ENGL 150Critical Thinking and Communication3
ENGL 250Written, Oral, Visual, and Electronic Composition3
LIB 160Information Literacy1
Embedded communication coursework in ENSCI 203, 381 and 382
Total Credits7
Additional communication Courses required of majors in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
SP CM 212Fundamentals of Public Speaking3
or AGEDS 311 Presentation and Sales Strategies for Agricultural Audiences
Total Credits3

5. General Education:  15-21 credits

General Education requirements in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Humanities 3
Social Science3
Ethics3
International Perspectives course from university approved list3
US Diversity course from university approved list3
Total Credits15
General Education requirements in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Arts and Humanities courses from college approved list12
Social Science courses from college approved list9
(Select courses to include 3 cr. of International Perspectives and 3 cr. of US Diversity)
Students must have completed 3 years of a single world language in high school or take 4-8 credits of World Languages at the university level
Total Credits21

Electives (28-35 credits)

120.0 Total Credits

Environmental Science, B.S.

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
ENGL 1503BIOL 211 & 211L or Elective3-4
ENSCI 11011CHEM 1783
ENSCI 20112CHEM 178L1
CHEM 1774MATH 160, 165 or 1814
CHEM 177L1Social Science or Humanities Choice23
LIB 1601 
STAT 101 or 1043 
 15 14-15
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
ENSCI 25013ENSCI 2513
Social Science or Humanities Choice23Organic Chemistry Choice33
PHYS 1154Earth Science Choice33
ENGL 2503Social Science or Humanities Choice23
Elective3Communications (Speech)3
 16 15
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
ENSCI 38113-4ENSCI 38213
Environmental Science Choice13ENSCI 3843
Social Science or Humanities Choice23Social Science or Humanities Choice23
Elective6Electives6
 15-16 15
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Environmental Science Choice13Environmental Science Choice16
Elective12Elective9
 15 15
1

Students complete at least 27 credits in Environmental Science including ENSCI 110,201, 250, 381, 382, and 15 additional credits of approved ENSCI coursework.

2

Students complete at least 15 credits in humanities and social science including at least 3 credits each in ethics, humanities, social science, U.S. Diversity, and International Perspectives from approved lists.

3

Students choose one course from the following Earth Science related courses: AGRON 182, BIOL 212, GEOL 100,  GEOL 201, MTEOR 206. Students choose from one of the following Organic Chemistry options: CHEM 231 & 231L, CHEM 331 & 331L, BBMB 221, or AGRON 259.

Graduate Study

Contact information for the graduate program:
Melissa Stolt
mstolt@iastate.edu
515-294-1170
https://enscigrad.iastate.edu/

The Environmental Science graduate program offers an interdepartmental curriculum leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees with a major in Environmental Science. Faculty from the colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Engineering, and Liberal Arts and Sciences cooperate to offer courses and research opportunities covering a broad array of environmental topics.  Cooperating departments include Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering; Agronomy; Animal Science; Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering; Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology; and Geological and Atmospheric Sciences.

Applicants should have completed an undergraduate or master’s degree in one of the biological, chemical, physical, or engineering sciences or should have equivalent preparation.

The Environmental Science Graduate Program emphasizes fundamental concepts and research, which at the same time address major environmental issues. The curriculum is designed to provide the interdisciplinary approach needed in environmental science education and research. In addition to work in their chosen area of specialization, students are afforded a broad exposure to the biological, chemical and physical aspects of environmental systems and the specialized training necessary for integrated analysis of these systems.

Information on application procedures, curriculum requirements, and faculty research areas is available on the Environmental Science Graduate Program website (https://enscigrad.iastate.edu/).

Expand all courses

Courses

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

(1-0) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Freshman classification in EnSci
Overview of Environmental Science curriculum and discussion of professional opportunities. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(Cross-listed with BIOL, ENV S). (2-0) Cr. 2. F.


Discussion of current and emerging environmental issues such as human population growth, energy use, loss of biodiversity, water resources, and climate change.

(1-0) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Credit or enrollment in ENSCI 201
Exploration of specific environmental and sustainability issues; designed to complement ENSCI 201. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(1-0) Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: ENSCI 202.
Continued exploration of specific environmental science issues developed in ENSCI 202. Topics may vary in different years. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(Cross-listed with ENV S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.


The distribution, origins and functions of the earth's physical systems and the spatial relationship between human activity and the natural world.

(Cross-listed with BIOL). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Plant and microbial processes in environmental systems including their interactions with human activities.

(Cross-listed with NREM). (3-3) Cr. 4. F.

Prereq: BIOL 211, BIOL 211L; FOR 201 or a second course in biology
Effects of environmental factors on ecosystem structure and function using forest, prairie and agricultural ecosystems as models. Special emphasis is given to soil-forming factors and the role of soil in nutrient and water cycling and ecosystem dynamics. Additional emphasis is given to human influences on natural ecosystems and the role of perennial plant communities in agricultural landscapes.

(Cross-listed with A ECL, BIOL). (3-3) Cr. 4. F.SS.

Prereq: BIOL 211, BIOL 211L, BIOL 212, and BIOL 212L
Fundamental concepts and principles of ecology dealing with organisms, populations, communities, and ecosystems. Laboratory and field exercises examine ecological principles and methods as well as illustrate habitats.

(Cross-listed with A ECL, IA LL). Cr. 4. SS.


An introduction to the principles of ecology at the population, community and ecosystem level. Field studies of local lakes, wetlands and prairies are used to examine factors controlling distributions, interactions, and roles of plants and animals in native ecosystems.

(Cross-listed with ENV S, GEOL, MTEOR). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Renewable and non-renewable energy resources. Origin, occurrence, and extraction of fossil fuels. Nuclear, wind, geothermal, biomass, hydroelectric, and solar energy. Biofuels. Energy efficiency. Environmental effects of energy production and use, including air pollution, acid precipitation, coal ash, mountaintop removal mining, oil drilling, hydraulic fracturing, groundwater contamination, nuclear waste disposal, and global climate change. Carbon sequestration and geoengineering solutions for reducing atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

(Cross-listed with NREM). (2-3) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Junior classification
Measurement and interpretation of aerial photos in resource management. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) using ArcGIS including digitizing, development and query of attribute tables, georeferencing, and use of multiple GIS layers in simple spatial analyses.

(Cross-listed with AGRON). (2-2) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: AGRON 182 (or equivalent) or ENSCI 250 or GEOL 201
Application of soil science to contemporary environmental problems; comparison of the impacts that different management strategies have on short- and long-term environmental quality and land development. Emphasis on participatory learning activities.

(Cross-listed with BIOL). Cr. 1-6. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: Six credits in biological and /or physical sciences, and permission of instructor.
Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with emphasis on ecological and environmental applications. No prior GIS experience required. Guided, individualized study of topics based on student background and interest. For students with prior experience, topics and activities are selected to build upon any previous experience and minimize duplication to previous GIS coursework. Potential topics include: basic concepts of GIS, data structures, database management, spatial analysis, modeling and visualization of ecological and environmental data. Case studies in ecological and environmental applications using ArcGIS. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 581). (Cross-listed with BIOL, ENV S, MICRO). Cr. 3-4. F.

Prereq: 12 credits of natural science including biology and chemistry
Introduction to the structure and function of natural environmental systems. Emphasis on the analysis of material and energy flows in natural environmental systems and the primary environmental factors controlling these systems.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 582). (Cross-listed with BIOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENSCI 381
Continuation of ENSCI 381. Systems approach to the analysis of material and energy flows in natural environmental systems and the primary environmental factors controlling these systems.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 12 credits of natural science including biology and chemistry
Biological and physical processes affecting material and energy flows in natural and managed ecosystems. Understanding and predicting climate and management impacts on ecosystem services and sustainability.

Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Approval of the Environmental Science coordinator
Supervised off-campus work experience in the field of environmental science. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Approval of the Environmental Science Coordinator
Practical experience in an approved setting such as a research laboratory, government office, or private office. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 502). (Cross-listed with GEOL, MTEOR, NREM). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering; junior standing
Examination of watersheds as systems, emphasizing the surface components of the hydrologic cycle. Combines qualitative understanding of hydrological processes and uncertainty with quantitative representation. Laboratory emphasizes field investigation and measurement of watershed processes.

(Cross-listed with AGRON, IA LL). Cr. 4. SS.

Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering
Effects of geomorphology, soils, and land use on transport of water and materials (nutrients, contaminates) in watersheds. Fieldwork will emphasize investigations of the Iowa Great Lakes watershed.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 504). (Cross-listed with AGRON, ENV S, MTEOR). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering; junior standing
Recent changes in global biogeochemical cycles and climate; models of future changes in the climate system; impacts of global change on agriculture, water resources and human health; ethical issues of global environmental change. Also offered online Alt. F, even-numbered years.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 505). (Cross-listed with AGRON, MTEOR). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: MATH 165 or MATH 182 or equivalent and some computer programming experience (any language)
Description of the physical microenvironment in which organisms live. Emphasis on the movement of energy (heat and radiation) and mass (water and carbon) among organisms, the soil, and atmosphere. Applications to humans, other animals, plants, and plant communities.

(Cross-listed with AGRON, MTEOR). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: AGRON 206/MTEOR 206
Distribution and causes of different climates around the world. Effects of climate and climate variations on human activities including society, economy and agriculture. Current issues such as climate change and international efforts to assess and mitigate the consequences of a changing climate. Semester project and in-class presentation required.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 507). (Cross-listed with ENV S, NREM). (3-3) Cr. 4. S.

Prereq: A course in general biology
Managing human impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Field and watershed level best management practices for modifying the impacts on water quality, quantity and timing are discussed. Field project includes developing a management plan using landscape buffers.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 508). (Cross-listed with A B E). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Working knowledge of computers and Windows environment
Introduction to fundamental concepts and applications of GIS in natural resources management with specific focus on watersheds. Topics include: basic GIS technology, data structures, database management, spatial analysis, and modeling; visualization and display of natural resource data. Case studies in watershed and natural resource management using ArcView GIS.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 508I ENSCI 408I). (Cross-listed with IA LL). Cr. 4. SS.

Prereq: Courses in ecology, chemistry, and physics
Analysis of aquatic ecosystems; emphasis on basic ecological principles; ecological theories tested in the field; identification of common plants and animals.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 509). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (0-4) Cr. 3. Alt. SS., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: GEOL/ENSCI 402 or GEOL/ENSCI 411 or C E 473
Introduction to field methods used in groundwater investigations. In-field implementation of pumping tests, slug tests, monitoring well installation and drilling techniques, geochemical and water quality sampling, seepage meters, minipiezometers, stream gaging, and electronic instrumentation for data collection. Field trips to investigate water resource, water quality, and remediation projects.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 511). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (3-2) Cr. 4. F.

Prereq: Four courses in biological or physical sciences
Physical principles of groundwater flow, nature and origin of aquifers and confining units, well hydraulics, groundwater modeling, and contaminant transport. Lab emphasizes applied field and laboratory methods for hydrogeological investigations.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 514). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: GEOL 411 or C E 473; MATH 165 or MATH 181
Introduction to the principles of modeling groundwater flow systems. Finite-difference and analytic-element methods, spreadsheet models, boundary conditions, calibration, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, particle tracking, and post-audit analysis. Application of MODFLOW to regional flow-system analysis. Computer laboratory emphasizes assigned problems that illustrate topics discussed in the course.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 515). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Four courses in biological or physical science
Introduction to mechanisms that drive climate, including the interplay between oceanic and atmospheric circulation and fluctuation in Earth's orbital parameters. Examination and analysis of past climate records ranging from historical documentation to ecological and geochemical proxies (e.g. tree ring analysis; O and C isotopes of skeletal carbonates and soils). Dating methods used to constrain and correlate climatic periods, utility of computer models to reconstruct past climates and predict future climate change. Emphasis placed on paleoclimatology and paleoecology of the late Quaternary (last ~1 million years).

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 516). (Cross-listed with GEOL, MTEOR). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Four courses in Earth science, meteorology, or engineering; junior standing.
Study of the basic principles of hydrologic modeling, including rainfall-runoff analysis, lumped and distributed modeling, conceptual and physical models, parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis, input and validation data, uncertainty analysis, and the use of models in surface water hydrology. A range of common models are applied to study hydrologic topics such as flood forecasting and land use change impacts. Previous experience with Matlab or other programming language is needed.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 518). (Cross-listed with A ECL). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: A ECL 486
Biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes that determine the structure and function of flowing water ecosystems. Current ecological theories as well as applications to stream management for water quality and fisheries.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 519). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: CHEM 178, CHEM 178L; junior classification
Geochemistry of natural waters and water-rock interactions. Acid-base equilibria, carbonate chemistry and buffer systems, mineral dissolution and precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, and redox reactions. Introduction to thermodynamics and kinetics. Laboratory emphasizes chemical analysis of waters and computer modeling.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 520). (Cross-listed with C E). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: C E 326, CHEM 178
Principles of chemical and physical phenomena applicable to the treatment of water and wastewater and natural waters; including chemical equilbria, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria, chemical precipitation, redox reactions, and mass transfer principles. Individual laboratory practicals and group projects required.

(Cross-listed with IA LL). Cr. 4. SS.

Prereq: Familiarity with basic principles in biological sciences and ecology
Basic patterns and underlying physical and biotic causes of both regional and local distributions of plants and animals of North American prairies; field and laboratory analyses and projects.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 524). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: Either PHYS 221 or CHEM 178 and either MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above
1 cr. per module. Module A prereq for all modules; module B prereq for D and E.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 524A). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: Either PHYS 221 or CHEM 178 and either MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above
1 cr. per module. Module A prereq for all modules; module B prereq for D and E.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 524B). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: Either PHYS 221 or CHEM 178 and either MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above
1 cr. per module. Module A prereq for all modules; module B prereq for D and E.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 524C). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: C E 524A; PHYS 221 or CHEM 178; MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 524D). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: C E 524A, C E 524B; Either PHYS 221 or CHEM 178 and either MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 524E). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: Either PHYS 221 or CHEM 178 and either MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above
1 cr. per module. Module A prereq for all modules; module B prereq for D and E.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 526). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: Four courses in biological or physical science
Introduction to the theory, methods and applications of stable isotopes. Primary focus on the origin, natural abundance, and fractionation of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen isotopes. Applications of isotopic occurrence for elucidation of physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. Effects of plant physiology, photosynthesis, trophic structure, diffusion, evaporation, chemical precipitation, soil and atmospheric processes, and environmental factors on isotope abundance.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 537). (Cross-listed with A B E). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: CE 372 or equivalent
A project-based course on watershed-scale models for improving water quality. Legislative and judicial basis of the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program; approaches to TMDL development; principles and techniques for implementation; stakeholder engagement strategies. Hands-on experiences with GIS-interfaced models, data sources, calibration/validation, statistical assessment of model results, and simulation using multiple tools. In addition to other assignments, graduate students will present case studies of TMDLs using different modeling tools.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 546). (Cross-listed with NREM). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: 12 credits in student's major at 300 level or above, NREM 345 or equivalent experience with ArcGIS
Emphasis on the use of GPS as a data collection tool for GIS. Basic theory of GPS. Use of Global Positioning System technology for spatial data collection and navigation. Post-processing and real-time correction of GPS data. GPS data transfer to GIS for mapping applications. Use of GIS to construct waypoints for use in GPS navigation.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 551). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: GEOL 100 or GEOL 201, college algebra and trigonometry
Seismic, gravity, magnetic, resistivity, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating radar techniques for shallow subsurface investigations and imaging. Data interpretation methods. Lab emphasizes computer interpretation packages. Field work with seismic - and resistivity-imaging systems and radar.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 552). (Cross-listed with AGRON, GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: GEOL 100, GEOL 201 or equivalent
Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscientific data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 559). (Cross-listed with AGRON). (3-3) Cr. 4. F.

Prereq: Two semesters of college-level chemistry, MATH 140, AGRON 182 (or equivalent) or AGRON 360; GEOL 100 and AGRON 354 recommended
An introduction to the chemical properties of soils, chemical reactions and transformations in soils and surface waters, and their impact on the environment. Topics include solution chemistry in soils and surface waters, solid-phase composition of soils, reactions at the solid-solution interface, and applications to contemporary environmental issues.

(Cross-listed with ENV S, IA LL, L A). Cr. 4. SS.


Descriptive and predictive GIS modeling techniques, spatial statistics, and map algebra. Application of GIS modeling techniques to environmental planning and resource management.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 563). (Cross-listed with AGRON). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: AGRON 182 (or equivalent) or AGRON 260
Relationships between soil formation, geomorphology, and environment. Soil description, classification, geography, mapping, and interpretation for land use. Two weekend field trips. Credit for one of AGRON 463 or AGRON 463I may be applied for graduation.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 563I). (Cross-listed with AGRON, IA LL). Cr. 4. Alt. SS., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: AGRON 182 (or equivalent) or AGRON 260
Relationships between soil formation, geomorphology, and environment. Soil description, classification, geography, mapping, and interpretation for land use. Credit for only Agron 563 or 563I may be applied for graduation.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 564). (Cross-listed with BIOL). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 15 credits in biological sciences.
Ecology, classification, creation and restoration, and management of wetlands. Emphasis on North American temperate wetlands.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 566). (Cross-listed with ENT, NREM). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: permission of instructor
Land use and conservation techniques for improving ecosystem services including: pollination of crops, biological control of pests, prevention of erosion and water quality improvement.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 577). (Cross-listed with AGRON). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: AGRON 182 or equivalent and MATH 166 recommended
The physical soil system: the soil components and their physical interactions; transport processes involving water, air, and heat.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 579). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: GEOL 100 or GEOL 201 or equivalent experience
The study of physical processes that shape Earth's surface. Topics include weathering, sediment transport, and landform genesis with emphasis on fluvial, glacial, hillslope, eolian, and coastal processes. Applications to engineering and environmental problems. Laboratory includes topographic map interpretation and local field trips.

(Cross-listed with A B E). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: A B E 380 or permission of the instructor
Systems-level quantitative analysis of biological systems, including applications in foods, feeds, biofuels, bioenergy, and other biological systems. Introduction to economic analysis and life-cycle assessment of these systems at multiple production scales. Applying these tools to evaluate and improve cost and sustainability performance of these biological systems.

(Cross-listed with BIOL). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Combined 12 credits in biology, chemistry, and physics.
Introduction of the study of ecosystems and the biological and physical factors that influence their properties and dynamics. Conceptual foundations for ecosystem studies. Interactions among organisms, biological diversity, and ecosystem attributes. Quantitative analyses of accumulations, transformations, and fluxes of nutrients, water, and energy within and among ecosystems. Global change issues.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 585). (Cross-listed with AGRON, MICRO). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: AGRON 182 or equivalent; MICRO 201 and MICRO 201L recommended
The living organisms in the soil and what they do. Emphasis on soil biota composition, the carbon cycle and bioremediation, soil-plant-microbial relationships, and environmental issues.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 586). (Cross-listed with A ECL, BIOL). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: BIOL 312 or ENSCI 381 or ENSCI 402 or NREM 301
Structure and function of aquatic ecosystems with application to fishery and pollution problems. Emphasis on lacustrine, riverine, and wetland ecology.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 586L). (Cross-listed with A ECL, BIOL). (0-3) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 486
Field trips and laboratory exercises to accompany 486. Hands-on experience with aquatic research and monitoring techniques and concepts.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 587). (Cross-listed with BIOL, MICRO). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Six credits in biology and 6 credits in chemistry
Introduction to major functional groups of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms and their roles in natural systems.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 588). (Cross-listed with AGRON, GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: GIS course, such as GEOL 452, CRP 451, CRP 452, NREM 345, NREM 446, AE 408 or equivalent
GIS course with focus on the spatial analysis and modeling of raster data and triangulated irregular network (TIN) data. Uses ArcGIS and various extensions, such as Spatial Analyst, 3D Analyst, and ArcScene. Includes practical exercises during lectures, lab exercises, homework assignments, and (for GEOL 588) a class project.

Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Permission of the instructor and approval of the Environmental Science coordinator

Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.


Permission of instructor and approval of Environmental Science coordinator.

Cr. 1-3.

Prereq: Junior classification in Environmental Science, permission of instructor
Current topics and case studies related to the analysis and management of environmental systems. Individual and/or group projects.

Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Extended field trips to study environmental topics in varied locations. Location and duration of trips will vary. Trip expenses paid by students. Check with department for current offerings. A. International Tour B. Domestic Tour.

Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Extended field trips to study environmental topics in varied locations. Location and duration of trips will vary. Trip expenses paid by students. Check with department for current offerings.

Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Extended field trips to study environmental topics in varied locations. Location and duration of trips will vary. Trip expenses paid by students. Check with department for current offerings.

Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Permission of Environmental Science Coordinator
Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register prior to commencing each work period.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduates:

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 402). (Cross-listed with GEOL, MTEOR, NREM). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering; junior standing
Examination of watersheds as systems, emphasizing the surface components of the hydrologic cycle. Combines qualitative understanding of hydrological processes and uncertainty with quantitative representation. Laboratory emphasizes field investigation and measurement of watershed processes.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 404). (Cross-listed with AGRON, MTEOR). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering; junior standing
Recent changes in global biogeochemical cycles and climate; models of future changes in the climate system; impacts of global change on agriculture, water resources and human health; ethical issues of global environmental change. Also offered online Alt. F, even-numbered years.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 405). (Cross-listed with AGRON, MTEOR). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: MATH 165 or MATH 182 or equivalent and some computer programming experience (any language)
Description of the physical microenvironment in which organisms live. Emphasis on the movement of energy (heat and radiation) and mass (water and carbon) among organisms, the soil, and atmosphere. Applications to humans, other animals, plants, and plant communities.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 407). (Cross-listed with NREM). (3-3) Cr. 4. S.

Prereq: A course in general biology
Managing human impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Field and watershed level best management practices for modifying the impacts on water quality, quantity and timing are discussed. Field project includes developing a management plan using landscape buffers.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 408). (Cross-listed with A B E). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Working knowledge of computers and Windows environment
Introduction to fundamental concepts and applications of GIS in natural resources management with specific focus on watersheds. Topics include: basic GIS technology, data structures, database management, spatial analysis, and modeling; visualization and display of natural resource data. Case studies in watershed and natural resource management using ArcView GIS.

(Cross-listed with IA LL, NREM). Cr. 4. SS.

Prereq: Courses in ecology, chemistry, and physics
Analysis of aquatic ecosystems; emphasis on basic ecological principles; ecological theories tested in the field; identification of common plants and animals.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 409). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (0-4) Cr. 3. Alt. SS., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: GEOL/ENSCI 402 or GEOL/ENSCI 411 or C E 473
Introduction to field methods used in groundwater investigations. In-field implementation of pumping tests, slug tests, monitoring well installation and drilling techniques, geochemical and water quality sampling, seepage meters, minipiezometers, stream gaging, and electronic instrumentation for data collection. Field trips to investigate water resource, water quality, and remediation projects.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 411). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (3-2) Cr. 4. F.

Prereq: Four courses in biological or physical sciences
Physical principles of groundwater flow, nature and origin of aquifers and confining units, well hydraulics, groundwater modeling, and contaminant transport. Lab emphasizes applied field and laboratory methods for hydrogeological investigations.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 414). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: GEOL 411 or C E 473; MATH 165 or MATH 181
Introduction to the principles of modeling groundwater flow systems. Finite-difference and analytic-element methods, spreadsheet models, boundary conditions, calibration, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, particle tracking, and post-audit analysis. Application of MODFLOW to regional flow-system analysis. Computer laboratory emphasizes assigned problems that illustrate topics discussed in the course.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 415). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Four courses in biological or physical science
Introduction to mechanisms that drive climate, including the interplay between oceanic and atmospheric circulation and fluctuation in Earth's orbital parameters. Examination and analysis of past climate records ranging from historical documentation to ecological and geochemical proxies (e.g. tree ring analysis; O and C isotopes of skeletal carbonates and soils). Dating methods used to constrain and correlate climatic periods; utility of computer models to reconstruct past climates and predict future climate change. Emphasis placed on paleoclimatology and paleoecology of the late Quaternary (last ~ 1 million years).

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 416). (Cross-listed with GEOL, MTEOR). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Four courses in earth science, meteorology, or engineering; junior standing
Study of the basic principles of hydrologic modeling, including rainfall-runoff analysis, lumped and distributed modeling, conceptual and physical models, parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis, input and validation data, uncertainty analysis, and the use of models in surface water hydrology. A range of common models are applied to study hydrologic topics such as flood forecasting and land use change impacts. Previous experience with Matlab or other programming language is needed.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 418). (Cross-listed with A ECL). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: A ECL 486
Biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes that determine the structure and function of flowing water ecosystems. Current ecological theories as well as applications to stream management for water quality and fisheries.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 419). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: CHEM 178, CHEM 178L; junior classification
Geochemistry of natural waters and water-rock interactions. Acid-base equilibria, carbonate chemistry and buffer systems, mineral dissolution and precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, and redox reactions. Introduction to thermodynamics and kinetics. Laboratory emphasizes chemical analysis of waters and computer modeling.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 420). (Cross-listed with C E). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: C E 326, CHEM 178
Principles of chemical and physical phenomena applicable to the treatment of water and wastewater and natural waters; including chemical equilbria, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria, chemical precipitation, redox reactions, and mass transfer principles. Individual laboratory practicals and group projects required.

(Cross-listed with C E). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: C E 326
Fundamentals of biochemical and microbial processes applied to environmental engineering processes, role of microorganisms in wastewater treatment and bioremediation, bioenergetics and kinetics, metabolism of xenobiotic compounds, waterborne pathogens and parasites, and disinfection. Term paper and oral presentation.

(Cross-listed with C E). (2-2) Cr. 3.

Prereq: C E 521
Fundamentals of biochemical processes, aerobic growth in a single CSTR, multiple events in complex systems, and techniques for evaluating kinetic parameters; unit processes of activated sludge system, attached growth systems, stabilization and aerated lagoon systems, biosolids digestion and disposal, nutrient removal, and anaerobic treatment systems.

(Cross-listed with C E). (2-2) Cr. 3.

Prereq: C E 520
Material and energy balances. Principles and design of physical-chemical unit processes; including screening, coagulation, flocculation, chemical precipitation, sedimentation, filtration, lime softening and stabilization, oxidation, adsorption, membrane processes, ion exchange and disinfection; recovery of resources from residuals and sludges; laboratory exercises and demonstrations; case studies in mineral processing and secondary industries.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 424). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: Either PHYS 221 or CHEM 178 and either MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above
1 cr. per module. Module A prereq for all modules; module B prereq for D and E.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 424A). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: Either PHYS 221 or CHEM 178 and either MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above
1 cr. per module. Module A prereq for all modules; module B prereq for D and E.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 424B). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: Either PHYS 221 or CHEM 178 and either MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above
1 cr. per module. Module A prereq for all modules; module B prereq for D and E.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 424C). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: C E 524A; PHYS 221 or CHEM 178; MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 424D). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: C E 524A, C E 524B; Either PHYS 221 or CHEM 178 and either MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 424E). (Cross-listed with A B E, C E). (1-0) Cr. 1.

Prereq: Either PHYS 221 or CHEM 178 and either MATH 166 or 3 credits in statistics. Senior classification or above
1 cr. per module. Module A prereq for all modules; module B prereq for D and E.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 426). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: Four courses in biological or physical science
Introduction to the theory, methods and applications of stable isotopes. Primary focus on the origin, natural abundance, and fractionation of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen isotopes. Applications of isotopic occurrence for elucidation of physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. Effects of plant physiology, photosynthesis, trophic structure, diffusion, evaporation, chemical precipitation, soil and atmospheric processes, and environmental factors on isotope abundance.

(Cross-listed with C E). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: C E 326 or background courses in both environmental chemistry and microbiology; junior or higher standing
Evaluation, characterization, assessment, planning and design of solid and hazardous waste management systems, regulatory requirements, material characterization and collection, minimization and recycling, energy and materials recovery, composting, off-gas treatment, incineration, stabilization, and landfill design. Design of treatment and disposal systems, including physical, chemical, and biological treatment, solidification, incineration, secure landfill design, and final disposal site closure plus restoration.

(Cross-listed with A B E). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: E M 378 or CH E 356
Hydrology and hydraulics in agricultural and urbanizing watersheds. Design and evaluation of systems for the conservation and quality preservation of soil and water resources. Use and analysis of hydrologic data in engineering design; relationship of topography, soils, crops, climate, and cultural practices in conservation and quality preservation of soil and water for agriculture. Small watershed hydrology, water movement and utilization in the soil-plant-atmosphere system, agricultural water management, best management practices, and agricultural water quality. Graduate students will prepare several research literature reviews on topics covered in the class in addition to the other assignments.

(Cross-listed with A B E). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: A B E 431 or C E 372 or instructor permission
Characteristics and courses of non-point source (NPS) pollution in agricultural and urban watersheds, computer modeling and NPS pollution for terrestrial and aquatic systems, strategies to control and manage NPS pollution of water bodies, total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) and integrated watershed management. Graduate students are required to review research papers and develop/deliver lecture models on assigned topics.

(Cross-listed with A B E, NREM). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: C E 372 or GEOL/ENSCI/MTEOR 402, MATH 166 or equivalent
Soil erosion processes, soil loss equations and their application to conservation planning, sediment properties, initiation of sediment motion and over land flow, flow in alluvial channels and theory of sediment transport, channel stability, reservoir sedimentation, wind erosion, BMPs for controlling erosion.

(Cross-listed with GEOL). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: GEOL 511 or equivalent
Theory and practical considerations of fate and transport of solutes through porous geologic materials. Organic and inorganic contaminants in industrial and agricultural settings. Subsurface microbiology and biodegradation of aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Investigation of coupled processes (diffusion, advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation) using computer models. Soil and groundwater monitoring and remediation strategies.

(Cross-listed with EEOB, NREM). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: BIOL 366 or BIOL 474 or graduate standing
Theory and practice of restoring animal and plant diversity, structure and function of disturbed ecosystems. Restored freshwater wetlands, forests, prairies and reintroduced species populations will be used as case studies.

(Cross-listed with A ECL, EEOB, IA LL). Cr. 4. Alt. SS., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: A course in ecology
Ecological principles for the restoration of native ecosystems; establishment (site preparation, selection of seed mixes, planting techniques) and management (fire, mowing, weed control) of native vegetation; evaluation of restorations. Emphasis on the restoration of prairie and wetland vegetation.

(Cross-listed with A B E). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: A B E 431/A B E 531
Development of monitoring systems that support effective planning, performance evaluation, modeling, or environmental impact assessment of soil-, water-, and waste-management systems. Typical soil and water pollutants and physical, chemical, and biological characteristics that affect sample location and timing. Sample collection, documentation, chain-of-custody, and quality assurance procedures. In addition to other assignments, graduate students will prepare several research literature reviews on topics covered in the class and develop monitoring plans.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 437). (Cross-listed with A B E). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: CE 372 or equivalent
A project-based course on watershed-scale models for improving water quality. Legislative and judicial basis of the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program; approaches to TMDL development; principles and techniques for implementation; stakeholder engagement strategies. Hands-on experiences with GIS-interfaced models, data sources, calibration/validation, statistical assessment of model results, and simulation using multiple tools. In addition to other assignments, graduate students will present case studies of TMDLs using different modeling tools.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 446). (Cross-listed with NREM). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: 12 credits in student's major at 300 level or above, NREM 345 or equivalent experience with ArcGIS
Emphasis on the use of GPS as a data collection tool for GIS. Basic theory of GPS. Use of Global Positioning System technology for spatial data collection and navigation. Post-processing and real-time correction of GPS data. GPS data transfer to GIS for mapping applications. Use of GIS to construct waypoints for use in GPS navigation.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 451). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: GEOL 100 or GEOL 201, college algebra and trigonometry
Seismic, gravity, magnetic, resistivity, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating radar techniques for shallow subsurface investigations and imaging. Data interpretation methods. Lab emphasizes computer interpretation packages. Field work with seismic - and resistivity-imaging systems and radar.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 452). (Cross-listed with AGRON, GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: GEOL 100, GEOL 201 or equivalent
Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscientific data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses.

(Cross-listed with AGRON). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: AGRON 354
Composition and properties of soils in relation to the nutrition and growth of plants.

(Cross-listed with AGRON). (2-3) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: AGRON 354 and CHEM 211
Experimental and descriptive inorganic and organic analyses. Operational theory and principles of applicable instruments, including spectrophotometry, atomic and molecular absorption and emission spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and fluorescence, gas and ion chromatography, and ion-selective electrodes.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 459). (Cross-listed with AGRON). (3-3) Cr. 4. F.

Prereq: Two semesters of college-level chemistry, MATH 140, AGRON 182 (or equivalent) or AGRON 360; GEOL 100 and AGRON 354 recommended
An introduction to the chemical properties of soils, chemical reactions and transformations in soils and surface waters, and their impact on the environment. Topics include solution chemistry in soils and surface waters, solid-phase composition of soils, reactions at the solid-solution interface, and applications to contemporary environmental issues.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 463). (Cross-listed with AGRON). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: AGRON 182 (or equivalent) or AGRON 260
Relationships between soil formation, geomorphology, and environment. Soil description, classification, geography, mapping, and interpretation for land use. Two weekend field trips. Credit for one of AGRON 463 or AGRON 463I may be applied for graduation.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 463I). (Cross-listed with AGRON, IA LL). Cr. 4. Alt. SS., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: AGRON 182 (or equivalent) or AGRON 260
Relationships between soil formation, geomorphology, and environment. Soil description, classification, geography, mapping, and interpretation for land use. Credit for only Agron 563 or 563I may be applied for graduation.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 464). (Cross-listed with EEOB). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 15 credits in biological sciences.
Ecology, classification, creation and restoration, and management of wetlands. Emphasis on North American temperate wetlands.

(Cross-listed with EEOB, IA LL). Cr. 4. SS.

Prereq: IA LL 312I
Ecology, classification, creation, restoration, and management of wetlands. Field studies will examine the composition, structure and functions of local natural wetlands and restored prairie pothole wetlands. Individual or group projects.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 466). (Cross-listed with ENT, NREM). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: permission of instructor
Land use and conservation techniques for improving ecosystem services including: pollination of crops, biological control of pests, prevention of erosion and water quality improvement.

(Cross-listed with C E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: C E 372
Analysis of hydrologic data including precipitation, infiltration, evapotranspiration, direct runoff and streamflow; theory and use of frequency analysis; theory of streamflow and reservoir routing; use of deterministic and statistical hydrologic models. Fundamentals of surface water quality modeling, point and non-point sources of contamination. Design project.

(Cross-listed with C E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: C E 372
Principles of surface water flows and mixing. Introduction to hydrologic transport and water quality simulation in natural water systems. Advection, diffusion and dispersion, chemical and biologic kinetics, and water quality dynamics. Applications to temperature, dissolved oxygen, primary productivity, and other water quality problems in rivers, lakes and reservoirs. Deterministic vs. stochastic models.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: C E 372
Principles of groundwater flow, hydraulics of wells, superposition, slug and pumping tests, streamlines and flownets, and regional groundwater flow. Contaminant transport. Computer modeling. Design project. Extra assignments required for graduate students.

(Cross-listed with AGRON). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: AGRON 463 or equivalent
Advanced study of soil formation, emphasizing relationships among soils, landscapes, environment, humans, and land use.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 477). (Cross-listed with AGRON). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: AGRON 182 or equivalent and MATH 166 recommended
The physical soil system: the soil components and their physical interactions; transport processes involving water, air, and heat.

(Cross-listed with AGRON). (0-3) Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: concurrent enrollment in AGRON 477 or AGRON 577
Methods of measuring soil physical properties such as texture, density, and water content, and transport of heat, water, and gases.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 479). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: GEOL 100 or GEOL 201 or equivalent experience
The study of physical processes that shape Earth's surface. Topics include weathering, sediment transport, and landform genesis with emphasis on fluvial, glacial, hillslope, eolian, and coastal processes. Applications to engineering and environmental problems. Laboratory includes topographic map interpretation and local field trips.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 381). (Cross-listed with EEOB). Cr. 3-4. F.

Prereq: 12 credits of natural science including biology and chemistry
Introduction to the structure and function of natural environmental systems. Emphasis on the analysis of material and energy flows in natural environmental systems and the primary environmental factors controlling these systems.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 382). (Cross-listed with EEOB). (2-2) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: ENSCI 381
Continuation of ENSCI 381. Systems approach to the analysis of material and energy flows in natural environmental systems and the primary environmental factors controlling these systems.

(Cross-listed with EEOB). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: Combined 12 credits in biology, chemistry, and physics.
Advanced studies of ecosystems and the biological and physical factors that influence their properties and dynamics. Conceptual foundations and modern approaches to ecosystem studies. Interactions among organisms, biological diversity, and ecosystem attributes. Quantitative analyses of accumulations, transformations, and fluxes of nutrients, water, and energy within and among ecosystems. Global change issues.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 485). (Cross-listed with AGRON, MICRO). (2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: AGRON 182 or equivalent; MICRO 201 and MICRO 201L recommended
The living organisms in the soil and what they do. Emphasis on soil biota composition, the carbon cycle and bioremediation, soil-plant-microbial relationships, and environmental issues.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 486). (Cross-listed with A ECL, EEOB). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: BIOL 312 or ENSCI 381 or ENSCI 402 or NREM 301
Structure and function of aquatic ecosystems with application to fishery and pollution problems. Emphasis on lacustrine, riverine, and wetland ecology.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 486L). (Cross-listed with A ECL, EEOB). (0-3) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 486
Field trips and laboratory exercises to accompany 486. Hands-on experience with aquatic research and monitoring techniques and concepts.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 487). (Cross-listed with EEOB, MICRO). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Six credits in biology and 6 credits in chemistry
Introduction to major functional groups of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms and their roles in natural systems.

(Dual-listed with ENSCI 488). (Cross-listed with AGRON, GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: GIS course, such as GEOL 452, CRP 451, CRP 452, NREM 345, NREM 446, AE 408 or equivalent
GIS course with focus on the spatial analysis and modeling of raster data and triangulated irregular network (TIN) data. Uses ArcGIS and various extensions, such as Spatial Analyst, 3D Analyst, and ArcScene. Includes practical exercises during lectures, lab exercises, homework assignments, and (for GEOL 588) a class project.

Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Permission of major professor in Environmental Science faculty
Literature reviews and conference in accordance with needs and interest of the student.

Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Permission of major professor in Environmental Science faculty
Creative component for nonthesis master of science degree.

Courses for graduate students:

(Cross-listed with AGRON, MICRO). (2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: AGRON 585
Chemistry of soil organic matter and biochemical transformations brought about by microorganisms and enzymes in soils.

Cr. 1. Repeatable. S.


Reports and discussion of recent research and literature.

Cr. arr. Repeatable. F.S.SS.