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Political Science

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The study of political science is designed to enable students to understand the nature of politics, public values, and the institutions and processes of politics in their various forms.

Students completing a major in political science will understand and be able to interrelate the leading theories, literature, and approaches in the subfields of American government, political theory and methods, international relations, and comparative politics. Graduates can analyze and formulate effective argumentation in written and oral forms, including the ability to appreciate and accommodate diverse political ideas, and the ability to collect and critique information and ideas of others in support of original arguments. Graduates appreciate the knowledge and civic responsibilities required for effective participation in political life.

The political science major is often chosen by students preparing for a career in law. Students with this goal should consult with the department in selecting courses. See also Preprofessional Study.

Several internship options are available to the political science major, offering students the opportunity to experience practical application of the knowledge learned in academic courses.

Requirements for the Major:

For the purpose of defining undergraduate requirements in the Department of Political Science, the Department employs four subfields within the discipline, with the following courses in each:

I. Theory and Methods

POL S 235Introduction to Ethics and Politics3
POL S 313Special Topics in Theory and Methods2
POL S 333Democracy and Diversity in America3
POL S 339Liberty and Law in America3
POL S 430Foundations of Western Political Thought3
POL S 431Modern Political Thought3
POL S 470Political Game Theory3
POL S 480Ethics and Public Policy3
POL S 490BIndependent Study: Theory and Methodarr †
Total Credits23 †
† Arranged with instructor.

II. American Government and Politics

POL S 215Introduction to American Government3
POL S 305Political Behavior3
POL S 306Public Opinion and Voting Behavior3
POL S 310State and Local Government3
POL S 312Special Topics in American Government and Politics2
POL S 318Campaign and Elections3
POL S 319Law and Politics3
POL S 320American Judicial Process3
POL S 334Politics and Society3
POL S 335Science, Technology, and Public Policy3
POL S 344Public Policy3
POL S 360American Institutions: Congress3
POL S 361American Institutions: The Presidency3
POL S 363American Institutions: Media3
POL S 364Political Parties and Interest Groups3
POL S 370Religion and Politics3
POL S 371Public Organizations and Leadership3
POL S 385Women in Politics3
POL S 383Environmental Politics and Policies3
POL S 413Intergovernmental Relations3
POL S 417Campaign Rhetoric3
POL S 420Constitutional Law3
POL S 421Constitutional Freedoms3
POL S 475Management in the Public Sector3
POL S 487Electronic Democracy3
POL S 490AIndependent Study: American Government and Politicsarr †
† Arranged with instructor.

III. Comparative Politics

POL S 241Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics3
POL S 314Special Topics in Comparative Politics2
POL S 340Politics of Developing Areas3
POL S 343Latin American Government and Politics3
POL S 345Immigration Policy3
POL S 346European Politics3
POL S 349Politics of Russia and the Soviet Successor States3
POL S 350Politics of the Middle East3
POL S 442The Policy and Politics of Coastal Areas3
POL S 485Comparative Public Administration3
POL S 490CIndependent Study: Comparative Politicsarr †
† Arranged with instructor.

IV. International Relations

POL S 251Introduction to International Politics3
POL S 315Special Topics in International Relations2
POL S 356Theories of International Politics3
POL S 357International Security Policy3
POL S 358United States Foreign Policy3
POL S 359Current Issues in American Foreign Policy3
POL S 381International Political Economy3
POL S 422International Law3
POL S 452Comparative Foreign Policy3
POL S 453International Organizations3
POL S 490DIndependent Study: International Relationsarr †
† Arranged with instructor.

To complete the major in Political Science a student must earn 33 semester credits of courses in Political Science subject to the following conditions:

  1. Students must satisfactorily complete POL S 101 and POL S 301.
  2. Students must complete at least 3 credits in each of the four subfields listed above. Students may apply only one half-semester mini-course (POL S 312, POL S 313, POL S 314, POL S 315) in each group.
  3. Political Science courses in which a student has a grade of D+ or lower will not count for the major but can be counted as electives.
  4. At least 18 credits of Political Science courses must be numbered 300 or above.
  5. Students must pass one statistics course from among STAT 101, STAT 104, STAT 226, or STAT 231.
  6. No more than nine credits of POL S 496, POL S 497, or POL S 499 (alone or in combination) can be used to fulfill any of these requirements. A maximum of three credits of POL S 490 can be applied to meet any of the four subfield requirements.
  7. A maximum of six credits from half-semester mini-courses (POL S 312, POL S 313, POL S 314, POL S 315) can be applied to satisfy the above requirements.
  8. At least 15 credits of Political Science coursework must be earned at Iowa State University.
  9. Advanced Communication Skills: Majors must earn at least a C in one course from among ENGL 302ENGL 309, or ENGL 314.

The department offers a minor in political science that may be earned by completing 15 credits beyond the 100-level of coursework in political science, nine of which must be at the 300 level or above. A student minoring in Political Science normally will be expected to take at least 9 credits in Political Science coursework at Iowa State University. Only 3 credits of POL S 490 or POL S 499, alone or in combination, and only 2 credits of POL S 312, POL S 313, POL S 314, or POL S 315 may be included in the total of 15 credits required for the minor. All minors in the College of Liberal Arts and Science require a minimum of 6 credits in courses numbered 300 and above taken at ISU with a minimum grade of C. Credits earned in POL S 496, POL S 497, or POL S 499, offered on a satisfactory/fail basis only, will not fulfill this requirement.

Political Science, B.A.

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
ENGL 1503POL S 25113
LIB 1601Social Science Choice3
POL S 1011Natural Science Choice3
POL S 2153Humanities Choice3
Humanities choice3Elective3
Natural Science Choice3 
Social Science Choice3 
 17 15
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
POL S 2353POL S 2413
ENGL 2503Political Science Choice 300/400 Level3
Foreign Language/Elective3-4Foreign Language/Elective3-4
Humanities Choice3STAT 101, 104, 226 or 23123-4
Natural Science Choice2-3Elective2-3
 14-16 14-17
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
POL S 3013One of the following: 3
Political Science Choice - 300/400 Level2-3 
U.S. Diversity Choice33 
Humanities Choice3 
Elective3Political Science Choice 300/400 Level2-3
 Electives9
 14-15 14-15
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Political Science Choice - 300/400 Level3Political Science Choice - 300/400 Level3
Electives12Electives11
 15 14

 Students in all ISU majors must complete a three-credit course in U.S. diversity and a three-credit course in international perspectives. Check (http://www.registrar.iastate.edu/courses/div-ip-guide.html) for a list of approved courses. Discuss with your adviser how the two courses that you select can be applied to your graduation plan.

 LAS majors require a minimum of 120 credits, including a minimum of 45 credits at the 300/400 level.

1

Meets international perspectives requirement.

2

Meets LAS College math requirement.

3

May be cross-listed to fulfill other requirements.

Graduate Study

The department offers work for a Master of Arts degree (MA) with a major in political science and minor for students in other departments. The department also offers work for a Graduate Certificate of Public Management and Policy (GCPMP) for those interested in an educational certificate program that requires less work than a full masters program.  In addition, the Department of Political Science offers work for a Master of Science in Information Assurance (MSIA) and a joint Master of Arts/Juris Doctor (MA/JD) program with the Law School of Drake University.  Information with detailed requirements for all graduate degrees may be obtained at the department’s web page at https://www.pols.iastate.edu/academics/graduate/

Master of Arts (MA)

This is a 30-credit masters degree that gives students the opportunity to explore the field of political science in order to pursue a PhD, go to law school, improve research skills, or understand politics better.  The three concentration areas are American Politics, Global Politics, and Public Policy.  Although it is not a formal concentration, some students have worked heavily in the area of political theory. Top students are eligible for graduate assistantships that make graduate study much more affordable and provide opportunities for assisting faculty with teaching and research.  These are awarded on a merit basis.  A thesis is required for this degree. The department also has a joint Master of Arts/Juris Doctor (MA/JD) program with the Law School of Drake University.  Students wishing to pursue this joint degree must submit separate applications to Drake University and Iowa State University and be accepted by both institutions.

MA graduates have a broad substantive understanding of the political process and the academic study of politics. They also have in-depth knowledge of one or more subfields in political science. Graduates are skilled at conducting research and preparing thorough research summaries. They are able to identify and address complex political questions, taking into account related ethical, legal, economic, and social issues.

The prerequisites for major graduate work in the MA program normally are completion of at least 15 credits in political science, the GRE (Graduate Record Examination), one year of a foreign language (equivalent to 8 semester hours), and a course in basic statistics (equivalent to STAT 101). If the basic statistics requirement has not been met, the student may remedy the deficiency by passing equivalent courses, for which no graduate credit will be received. During their program of study, all students are expected to complete STAT 401, POL S 502, and a thesis. Additional information including detailed graduation requirements can be found at https://www.pols.iastate.edu/academics/graduate/#ma

Master of Science in Information Assurance (MSIA)

The Master of Science in Information Assurance (MSIA) is a multi-disciplinary program designed to provide students with diverse backgrounds and interests the opportunity to obtain professional training in the emerging field of information assurance. The core of the MSIA program is built around a series of courses taught in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mathematics, and Computer Science that introduce students to software and hardware aspects of cryptography and computer security. The program also recognizes, however, that information assurance defined in terms of security, privacy, access, and reliability is not simply a technical problem but also involves important societal dimensions, including policy, education, ethics, and management. Recognizing that political science offers many potential intersections with information assurance (e.g., public sector management of information technology; forensics and computer crime; information technology policy and law; information technology and international relations; information warfare; etc.), students with interests in these areas are encouraged to select the Department of Political Science as their home department.

Students opting to pursue a MSIA degree through the Department of Political Science can expect to acquire skills and background knowledge relevant to a career in public policy or public sector management of information assurance technologies. The MSIA degree can also help prepare students who wish to go on to pursue a PhD in information politics and policy.

Students interested in the MSIA degree program should consider Political Science as a home department if their future career and/or educational interests lie in such areas as: institutional issues related to the Internet and information technologies; electronic government and electronic democracy; information technology, international security, and information warfare; information technology policy and law; and public administration and public sector management of information technology.

Admission requirements generally follow the same guidelines as the MA in Political Science.  Degree requirements are specified by the MSIA program in cooperation with Political Science.  More in-depth information on the program including detailed graduation requirements can be found at: https://www.pols.iastate.edu/academics/graduate/#msia

Master of Arts/Juris Doctorate Program (MA/JD)

The Drake Law School and the Department of Political Science at Iowa State University are co-sponsors of the Master of Arts/Juris Doctorate degree.  This degree combines courses at both Iowa State University and the Drake Law School and follows most of the same requirements as a double degree. However, the student must have full admission to both schools.  Detailed information for the MA/JD can be found at the ISU Political Science webpage as well as the Drake Law School website (under Joint Degree): http://www.law.drake.edu/.

The increasing attention being focused on the solution of social problems by state and federal governments has created a need for persons with advanced training in both law and political science.  The Drake Law School and the ISU Department of Political Science jointly administer a MA/JD program to provide an opportunity for students at the Drake Law School to achieve, concurrently, a JD degree in law and a MA degree in political science, and for graduate students in political science at Iowa State University to achieve a degree in law.

Successful completion of this program will enable students at Drake Law School to receive both a JD and an MA degree within a three-year period, while graduate students in political science at Iowa State University will be able to transfer a substantial number of hours to the Drake Law School toward the fulfillment of the JD requirements in a similar amount of time.  Additional information including detailed graduation requirements can be found at: https://www.pols.iastate.edu/academics/graduate/#majd

Minor

Students in other graduate programs may obtain a minor in political science by completing at least 9 credits of political science courses. Interested students should consult the Graduate College Handbook for additional information on graduate minors.

The Graduate Certificate of Public MANAGEMENT AND POLICY  (GCPMP)

The Political Science Department offers a Graduate Certificate of Public Management and Policy (GCPMP). The GCPMP is a 15-credit certificate.  Students who are interested in public management and policy, but unsure about committing to a full master's degree, can aim for the certificate knowing that those courses will also count toward a master's degree if they choose to continue on.  Iowa State graduate students in other fields may want to pursue the certificate to improve their credentials on the job market if their interest overlaps with public management and policy.  For example, doctoral students in higher education and education administration can earn all 9 of their "outside" credits in the GCPMP coursework, add the 6 more elective credits, and earn a GCPMP along with their PhD.

Requirements for admission are a graduate school application, an essay stating purposes for study, college transcripts, the GRE (waived for those with five or more years of public or nonprofit sector experience), three letters of recommendation, and the TOEFL for international students. More information on the program including curricular requirements can be found at: https://www.pols.iastate.edu/academics/graduate/#gcpm/.

Expand all courses

Courses

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

(2-0) Cr. 1. F.S.

Prereq: Political Science and Open Option majors only or permission of the instructor
Introduction to the discipline and sub-fields of Political Science, including an introduction to analytical thinking, and research skills relevant to political science. Orientation to university, college, and departmental structure, policies, and procedures; student roles and responsibilities; degree planning and career awareness. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.


Fundamentals of American democracy; constitutionalism; federalism; rights and duties of citizens; executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government; elections, public opinion, interest groups, and political parties.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.SS.


Introduction to moral controversies surrounding political issues such as violence, deception, corruption, civil disobedience, democracy, justice, equality, and freedom. Students will read classic and contemporary texts and consider political applications.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Basic concepts and major theories; application to selected political systems, including non-western political systems.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Dynamics of interstate relations pertaining to nationalism, the nation state; peace and war; foreign policy making; the national interest; military capability and strategy; case studies of transnational issues, such as population, food, energy, and terrorism.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Permission of department cooperative education coordinator; sophomore classification
Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 3 credits in political science; one statistics course required; sophomore classification
Techniques of quantitative and qualitative political research and analysis. Development and analysis of concepts and theories. Methods of data collection, research design, and critical thinking. Applications of statistics to political research.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Empirical theories and descriptions of political behavior, including decision-making, opinion, and attitudes, with an emphasis on groups and political elites.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science or sophomore classification
The formation of political opinions and attitudes, political participation, and voting behavior of the general public, and their influences on American politics; polling as a means of assessing public opinions and behaviors.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 3 credits in political science
Role of state and local governments in the American federal system. Structures of participation: political parties, elections, interest groups. Major governmental institutions: legislative, executive, and judicial. Structure and functions of local governments.

(3-0) Cr. 2. F.S.


Half-semester courses on selected topical issues in American government and politics. A topic may not be taken more than once.

(1.5-0) Cr. 2. F.S.


Half-semester course on selected topical issues in theory and methods in political science. A topic may not be taken more than once.

(1.5-0) Cr. 2. F.S.


Half-semester course on selected topical issues in comparative politics. A topic may not be taken more than once.

(1.5-0) Cr. 2. F.S.


Half-semester course on selected topical issues in international relations. A topic may not be taken more than once.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.


Methods and techniques of political campaigns in general elections. Supervised participation in candidate and political party campaign activities required.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: Sophomore standing; POL S 215 recommended
An evaluation of the American judicial system as it relates to controversial topics emphasizing the relationship between law and politics. Primary emphasis on topics such as statutory construction, judicial review, the proper role of the judiciary, vagueness and ambiguity in law, competing constitutional philosophies, executive branch concerns, and relative power of different branches. Credit for both Pol S 319 and 230 may not be applied toward graduation.

(Cross-listed with CJ ST). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: POL S 215
An overview of the American judicial process. Emphasis on specific topics such as application of constitutional rights to the states (particularly the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments), mechanics of judicial opinions, constitutional philosophies of Supreme Court Justices, decisions of first impression, and the value and scope of precedent.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Sophomore classification.
Examination of competing Americans' conceptions of democracy as strategies for responding to the racial, religious, ethnic, gender, and economic diversity of the inhabitants of America. Connections to contemporary debates about topics such immigration, affirmative action, multicultural education, religion, and minority representation.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with SOC). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: A course in political science or sociology
The relationship between politics and society with emphasis on American society. Discussion of theories of inequality, power, social movements, elites, ruling classes, democracy, and capitalism.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Examines the history and political dynamics of public science and technology policies. Examines differences in political and technological orientations. Assessment of the roles of politics, media, engineering, science, and private business in the formation public policies that put heavy reliance on or seek to advance science and technology.

(Cross-listed with CJ ST, PHIL). Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore status
An exploration of competing conceptions of liberty in American political thought and debates about how liberty should be protected by the law. Contemporary debates about topics such as health care, drugs, property, speech, religion, and sex.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.


Examination of economic and political development as they relate to the political process of developing states. Impact of social and technological change on political systems of developing areas. Some case studies.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Legacies of Imperial China, the origins of the Chinese Civil War, and the causes and consequences of the reform era. Issues of contemporary China, including economic transformation, the structure of the Party/state, the environment, the media and other topics.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(Cross-listed with US LS). (3-0) Cr. 3.


Political institutions, processes, and contemporary issues. Selected countries examined intensively to illustrate generalizations. Role of parties, military, church, human rights, women, environmental issues, interest groups, ideology, and globalization.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


How agendas come to be set in public policy, theories describing the policy-making process, forces molding policy choices and the impact of such choices.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Junior or Senior classification
Political, economic, and social factors that affect immigration policy in the United States and abroad. Systematic analysis and implications of different types of immigration policies in countries sending and receiving immigrants.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Comparative study of political institutions of Europe and the European Union; emphasis on parties, elections, and governmental structures. Substance and process of public policies in selected problem areas.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.


Nation-states of the former Soviet Union. Analysis of Soviet Communist system 1917-85 and the politics and revolutionary conflict leading to the dissolution of the Soviet Union from 1985 through 1991. Problems of post-Soviet nation-states of Russia and Central Eurasia since 1991.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Introduction to the Middle East as a region and to issues of political importance to the Middle East and its place in the world. Topics covered include Islam, regional conflicts and alliances, local leaders, economic issues, and gender and social relations.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(Cross-listed with ANTHR). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: POL S 235, POL S 251, or ANTHR 230
Humanitarianism as a system of thought and a system of intervention in conflict and post-conflict situations: role of humanitarian organizations and actors in addressing human suffering caused by conflict or war military action as a form of humanitarian intervention.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Introduction to essential theoretical concepts and approaches, both classical and contemporary on world politics including realism, empiricism, liberalism, and postpositivism; for example, war and conflict, peace and cooperation, political economy, crisis decision-making, systemic theory, dependence and interdependence.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


The major theoretical approaches in security policy -- strategy and deterrence, game theory, bargaining theory, compellance, and coercive diplomacy, and crisis diplomacy. Illustration of these various approaches through historical and contemporary cases.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: POL S 215 or POL S 251, or HIST 467 or HIST 470 or HIST 471
U.S. foreign policy since World War II with emphasis on changing American values in foreign policy, the role of the President, Congress, and the bureaucracy in policy making, and a survey of current foreign policy issues and problems.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: POL S 215, POL S 251, or POL S 358
Examination of contemporary U.S. foreign policy issues (e.g., U.S. policy in the Middle East; defense budgeting in the post-Cold War era; conventional and nuclear arms control policy). The course will explore alternate methods to analyze policy, survey the evolution of each issue, and discuss different policy alternatives.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: POL S 215
Theory and practice of representation and deliberation in the legislative branch of the republic; operations of Congress in terms of its committees, leadership, legislative and oversight processes, partisan politics, electoral campaigns, service to local and special electoral campaigns, service to local and special interests, and interactions with the President.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: POL S 215
Creation and historical development of the office of chief executive; character and behavior of past chief executives; selection and control; powers, roles, functions; executive staff; relations with Congress, press, public opinion.

Cr. 3.


Exploration of the genesis, purpose, and power of judicial review, federal common law, judicial confirmation, merit of strict construction of the Constitution, and qualifications to serving on Courts; judicial activism and the infusion of politics into courts.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore standing
Course surveys the influence of mass media organizations, forms, techniques, and technologies on the practices and expectations of American politics. Evaluates the role of media in the political process, exploring the extents to which media promotes or discourages political participation. Topics will examine the influence and political uses of news coverage, political advertising, political debates, talk radio, film, the Internet, and media spectacles.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: POL S 215; sophomore classification
Nature of political parties and interest groups, their relation to each other, and their effects on American politics. Topics include party identification, party organization and mobilization, factionalism, lobbying, campaign contributions and financing, and the effects of special interests on public law.

(Cross-listed with RELIG). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification.
The interaction of religion and politics in the U.S. from both an historical and contemporary perspective, as well as the role of religion in politics internationally.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
A survey of the historic and contemporary administrative realities that contribute to the unique challenges of public governance at the administrative and managerial levels of international, national, state, and local government. This introductory course explores the essential issues and competencies involved in the efficient, effective, and ethical provision of public goods and services. Critical topics addressed in the course include crisis management, intergovernmental relations, social equity, public-private partnerships, and privatization.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Introduction to the theoretical perspectives on international political economy. Exploration of specific issues such as the changing international trade regime, international finance, and Third World development under conditions of globalization.

(Cross-listed with ENV S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: sophomore classification
Major ideologies relation to conservation and ecology. Processes, participants, and institutions involved in state, national, and global environmental policymaking. Case studies of environmental controversies and proposals for policy reform.

(Cross-listed with W S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Examination of the entry and participation of women in politics in the United States and other countries including a focus on contemporary issues and strategies for change through the political process.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

Cr. R. F.S.SS.


Taken in conjunction with 300- or 400-level Political Science courses. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. arr. Repeatable. SS.

Prereq: Permission of instructor.
Supervised study in an aspect of discipline while traveling or located in a foreign country.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Permission of department cooperative education coordinator; junior classification
Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work period.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered irregularly.

Prereq: Junior classification or permission of instructor.
Introduction to the style of legal analysis traditionally used in American law schools to teach law and prepare for legal practice. Topics include case briefing, legal citation, application of legal doctrines, and adversarial argument.

(Dual-listed with POL S 513). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 6 credits in American government
Theories and practices of the American federal system. Politics and policy making among federal, state, and local governments.

(Cross-listed with SP CM). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: SP CM 212
Backgrounds of candidates for state and national elections; selected speeches and issues; persuasive strategies and techniques of individual speakers.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: POL S 215; junior classification
Development of the United States Constitution through judicial action; influence of public law and judicial interpretations upon American government and society.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: POL S 320 or POL S 420
Leading Supreme Court cases interpreting the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Emphasis on religion, speech, privacy, due process, and equal protection.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: POL S 215 or POL S 251; junior classification
Development of the principles of international law of peace and war; analysis of theories concerning its nature and fundamental conceptions; its relation to national law; problems of international legislation and codification.

(Cross-listed with CL ST). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science, philosophy, or European history
Study of original texts in political thought ranging from the classical period to the renaissance. Topics such as justice, freedom, virtue, the allocation of political power, the meaning of democracy, human nature, and natural law.

(Dual-listed with POL S 531). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science, philosophy, or European history
Study of original texts in political thought ranging from the Reformation to the French Revolution and its aftermath. Topics such as justice, freedom, rights, democracy, toleration, property, power, skepticism, and normative views of international politics.

(Dual-listed with POL S 542). (Cross-listed with ENV S). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS.


Exploration of political implications of coastal policy. Issues include: "Carrying capacity," zoning, regulation of human development activities, trade-offs between conservation and jobs, the quality of coastal lifestyle, ways in which citizens participate in policy for coastal areas.

(Dual-listed with POL S 552). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: POL S 251
Various theoretical approaches to explain foreign policy making and behavior through the use of case studies of selected nations.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: POL S 251
Private and public organizations such as the United Nations, other specialized agencies, and multinational organizations, and their influence on our daily lives.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ECON 101
Application of economics to political science in the study of nonmarket decision-making. Behavior of bureaucrats, elected officials, and voters. Market failure, collective action, representative democracies, direct democracies, logrolling, voter paradoxes, and game theory.

(Dual-listed with POL S 575). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: POL S 371
Literature and research on organizational behavior and management theory with emphasis on applied aspects of managing contemporary public sector organizations. Topics include distinctions between public and private organizations, leadership, productivity, employee motivation, organizational structure, and organizational change.

(Dual-listed with POL S 577). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Diverse perspectives on the changing roles and relationships of business, government, and society so as to open the way for more effective policy decisions on corporate-government affairs. Topics may include the changing economy; transformation of workplace and community conditions; consumerism; social responsibilities of businesses; economic policies and regulations; and politics in the business-government relationship.

(Dual-listed with POL S 580). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Study of decision making approaches and application to case studies. Topics such as the different roles of public officials, proper scope and use of administrative discretion, and the admissibility of religious, political, and philosophical commitments in governmental decision making.

(Dual-listed with POL S 585). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Comparisons of government bureaucratic structures and processes in major world regions, trends and issues of administrative and management reforms, globalization and other contemporary challenges to state administrative structures and policies, skills needed to evaluate and implement public management reforms.

(Dual-listed with POL S 587). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore standing or instructor approval
The impact of computers, the Internet, and the World Wide Web on politics and policy. The positive and negative effects on information technology (IT) on selected topics such as freedom, power and control, privacy, civic participation, the sense of "community," "virtual cities," interest group behavior, the new media, campaigns, elections, and voting will be examined.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Special studies in the political institutions, processes and policies of American, foreign, and international governments. Also, studies in traditional and behavioral political theory. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. No more than 9 credits of Pol S 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Special studies in the political institutions, processes and policies of American, foreign, and international governments. Also, studies in traditional and behavioral political theory. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. No more than 9 credits of Pol S 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Special studies in the political institutions, processes and policies of American, foreign, and international governments. Also, studies in traditional and behavioral political theory. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. No more than 9 credits of Pol S 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Special studies in the political institutions, processes and policies of American, foreign, and international governments. Also, studies in traditional and behavioral political theory. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. No more than 9 credits of Pol S 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Special studies in the political institutions, processes and policies of American, foreign, and international governments. Also, studies in traditional and behavioral political theory. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. No more than 9 credits of Pol S 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Cr. 1-2. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Extra study for any 300-Special studies in the political institutions, processes and policies of American, foreign, and international governments. Also, studies in traditional and behavioral political theory. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. No more than 9 credits of Pol S 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Special studies in the political institutions, processes and policies of American, foreign, and international governments. Also, studies in traditional and behavioral political theory. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. No more than 9 credits of Pol S 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Special studies in the political institutions, processes and policies of American, foreign, and international governments. Also, studies in traditional and behavioral political theory. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. No more than 9 credits of Pol S 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Cr. 3.

Prereq: 21 credits of POL S and permission of instructor
Written under the supervision of a Political Science faculty advisor.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 12 credits in political science and permission of instructor
Undergraduate teaching experience through assisting an instructor with an introductory course in political science. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 12 credits in political science and permission of instructor
Undergraduate research experience through assisting on a scholarly project with an instructor in political science. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Permission of department cooperative education coordinator; senior classification
Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 12 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science; junior or senior classification; and permission of internship coordinator
Work experience with a specific nongovernmental or governmental agency at the local, state, national, or international level, combined with academic work under faculty supervision. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduates:

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Scope and methods of political science. Introduction to theoretical approaches and analytical reasoning in political science. Relationship of theory and data. Research design.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science or graduate standing
An overview of the major theoretical and empirical works in the study of international politics and foreign policy. Among the major theoretical approaches surveyed and applied to international politics are realism, neo-realism, liberalism, functionalism, rational choice theory, game theory, and decision-making theory. Seminal writings by leading scholars will be reviewed.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science or graduate standing
Major theoretic approaches to the study of comparative politics -- varying concepts and definitions of society and policy, administrative traditions, institutional arrangements, political behavior, etc. Contrasting research method designs.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science or graduate standing
A presentation of the major theories and research on American government and politics. Substantive topics include modern democratic theory, institutional performance, and mass political behavior. A variety of research methodologies are examined, including normative theory, behavioralism, and rational choice analysis.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Six credits in political science or graduate standing
An overview of the major theoretical approaches and empirical methods relevant to the study of public policy. Emphasis is placed on agenda setting, policy formation, policy sustainability, and policy analysis. Seminal writings by leading scholars will be reviewed. Leading quantitative and qualitative methodological tools for analyzing policy are presented.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: POL S 310
Comparative analysis of state political systems. Role of interest groups, political parties, legislatures, courts, and governors in state politics. Possible determinants of public policy outputs at the state level.

(Dual-listed with POL S 413). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 6 credits of American government
Theories and practices of the American federal system. Politics and policy making among federal, state, and local governments.

(Cross-listed with BRT). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Evaluation of the biorenewables field as it relates to the areas of law and policy. Primary emphasis on the following topics: concerns that motivated the development and expansion of the biorenewables field, a history of the interactions between biorenewable pathways. U.S. law and policy and controversies that have arisen from these interactions and their effects.

(Cross-listed with BRT). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Evaluation of the international biorenewables field as it relates to the areas of law and policy. Primary emphasis on the following topics: concerns that motivated the development and expansion of the field by adopting countries, a history of the interactions between biorenewable pathways. Law and policy in adopting countries and international controversies that have arisen from these interactions and their effects.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in Political Science or graduate standing
An in-depth survey of the theoretical, empirical, and methodological works concerning mass political behavior in the United States. Substantive topics include political attitudes and ideologies, public opinion and voting behavior, and political psychology. Methods for studying mass behavior include survey research and experimental approaches.

(Dual-listed with POL S 431). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science, philosophy, or European history
Study of original texts in political thought ranging from the Reformation to the French Revolution and its aftermath. Topics such as justice, freedom, rights, democracy, toleration, property, power, skepticism, and normative views of international politics.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Overview of the legal and policy context of E-government development. Topics include the legal and regulatory policies on information management in governments, and public policies that use information technologies to address economic and social concerns and their impacts on citizens and governmental organizations.

(Cross-listed with CPR E, INFAS). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Graduate classification; CPR E 531 or INFAS 531
Legal and ethical issues in computer security. State and local codes and regulations. Privacy issues.

(Cross-listed with PHIL). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: 6 credits of philosophy or political science
Examination of theories of justice proposed by contemporary political philosophers. Analysis of the philosophical foundations of perspectives such as liberalism, libertarianism, communitarianism, socialism, feminism. Normative assessments of socio-political institutions.

(Dual-listed with POL S 442). (Cross-listed with C DEV). (3-0) Cr. 3. SS.


Exploration of political implications of coastal policy. Issues include: "Carrying capacity," zoning, regulation of human development activities, tradeoffs between conservation and jobs, the quality of coastal lifestyle, and ways in which citizens participate in policy for coastal areas.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Examines how, why and to what effect governments deal with substantive policy problems differently. Environmental factors, ideologies, cultures, domestic policy making processes, and interest groups.

(Dual-listed with POL S 452). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: POL S 251
Various theoretical approaches to explain foreign policy making and behavior through the use of case studies of selected nations.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in American government
Examination of policy-making and governance in a separation of powers system. Interaction between the chief executive, the legislature, administrative agencies, and the public. How political and legal forces affect policy makers and are reflected in public policies and programs.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Graduate classification
An examination of the social, political, intellectual, and environmental factors contributing to the historical development and central issues of American Public Administration. Exploration of classic and contemporary texts of public administration emphasizing constitutional and civic roles of public servants, administrative responsibility in democratic governance and justice, and essential frameworks to identify managerial skills, perspectives, and resources for effective, equitable public service.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Discussion of contemporary issues and perspectives shaping the policy development and management of national and international nonprofit organizations. Topics include an historic overview of nonprofit and philanthropic perspectives; exploration of nonprofit organization roles in public service provision; review of the legal framework influencing nonprofit governance; and consideration of capacity building issues such as strategic planning, board development, fundraising, human resources, and volunteer management.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Major theories of administrative organization, including motivations of administrators and organizations, comparisons of organizational arrangements, factors affecting organizational arrangements, and formal and informal decision-making structures.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Topics such as the fiscal role of government in a mixed economy; evaluation of sources of public revenue and credit; administrative, political, and institutional aspects of the budget and the budgetary process; alternative budget formats; skills required to analyze public revenue and spending. Spreadsheet use required.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Course discusses the history and development of high performance personnel administration in the public and nonprofit sectors regarding strategic planning, employee rights and responsibilities, performance assessment, collective bargaining, and civil service systems. Emphasized basic competencies in the essential human resource management tools in the areas of recruitment, retention, employee development, compensation, discipline, and conflict resolution.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Integration, application, and utilization of public administration and public policy concepts in the interpretation of results and effectiveness of public programs and the prediction of consequences for policymakers and administrators.

(Dual-listed with POL S 475). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: POL S 371
Literature and research on organizational behavior and management theory with emphasis on applied aspects of managing contemporary public sector organizations. Topics include distinctions between public and private organizations, leadership, productivity, employee motivation, organizational structure, and organizational change.

(Dual-listed with POL S 477). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Diverse perspectives on the changing roles and relationships of business, government, and society so as to open the way for more effective policy decisions on corporate-government affairs. Topics may include the changing economy; transformation of workplace and community conditions; consumerism; social responsibilities of businesses; economic policies and regulations; and politics in the business-government relationship.

(Dual-listed with POL S 480). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
Study of decision making approaches and application to case studies. Topics such as the different roles of public officials, proper scope and use of administrative discretion, and the admissibility of religious, political, and philosophical commitments in governmental decision making.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science
An overview of the international political economy since the end of World War II. Special emphasis on national (primarily U.S.) development assistance and agricultural/food politics and policies, and those of the international food organizations, the World Bank, and the regional development banks.

(Dual-listed with POL S 485). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Comparisons of government bureaucratic structures and processes in major world regions, trends and issues of administrative and management reforms, globalization and other contemporary challenges to state administrative structures and policies, skills needed to evaluate and implement public management reforms.

(Dual-listed with POL S 487). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore standing or instructor approval
The impact of computers, the Internet, and the World Wide Web on politics and policy. The positive and negative effects on information technology (IT) on selected topics such as freedom, power and control, privacy, civic participation, the sense of "community," "virtual cities," interest group behavior, the new media, campaigns, elections, and voting will be examined.

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 3-6. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, permission of the instructor
Supervised internship with administrative agencies, legislative organizations, judicial branch offices, and nonprofit groups.

Courses for graduate students:

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

Cr. arr. Repeatable.