Sociology (SOC)

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Any experimental courses offered by SOC can be found at: registrar.iastate.edu/faculty-staff/courses/explistings/

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Courses

(1-0) Cr. 1. F.


Orientation to Agriculture and Society major. Familiarization with University and CALS College requirements. Exploration of career tracks and career planning. Recommended during first semester of freshman year or as soon as possible after transfer into the department.

(1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.


Orientation to sociology. A familiarization with University and LAS College requirements and procedures. Occupational tracks and career options open to sociology; introduction to career planning. Recommended during first semester of freshman year, or as soon as possible after transfer into the department. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.


Social interaction and group behavior with emphasis on the scientific study of contemporary U.S. society, including issues relating to socialization, inequality, and changing rural and urban communities. Analysis of relationships among the institutions of family, religion, political participation, work, and leisure.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.


Social interaction and group behavior with emphasis on the scientific study of contemporary U.S. society, including issues relating to socialization, inequality, and changing rural and urban communities. Analysis of relationships among the institutions of family, religion, political participation, work, and leisure.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: SOC 134
Analysis of intimate relationships among couples using a sociological perspective. Attention is given to singlehood; dating and courtship; sexuality; mate selection, cohabitation, and marriage. Relationship quality, communication, conflict and dissolution of these types of relationship will also be explored.

(Cross-listed with ANTHR, ENV S, GLOBE, M E, MAT E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


An introduction to understanding the key global issues in sustainability. Focuses on interconnected roles of energy, materials, human resources, economics, and technology in building and maintaining sustainable systems. Applications discussed will include challenges in both the developed and developing world and will examine the role of technology in a resource-constrained world. Cannot be used for technical elective credit in any engineering department.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Introduction to the causes and consequences of social and economic change affecting rural people and places. Uses a sociological perspective to examine social structures, social change, and social relationships within rural society. Topics include community, population change, inequality, rural economy, structure of agriculture, social and environmental impacts of resource extraction.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: SOC 134
Sociological concepts, theories and methods to analyze the causes and consequences of social problems. Social problems discussed may include crime, substance abuse, income inequalities, discrimination, poverty, race relations, health care, family issues, and the environment. How American culture and values shape societal conditions, public discourse and policy.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with C J). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.


An examination of delinquency that focuses on the relationship between youth as victims and as offenders, social and etiological features of delinquency, the role of the criminal justice system, delinquents' rights, and traditional and alternative ways of dealing with juvenile crime.

(Cross-listed with RELIG). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: SOC 134
Religion as a human construction, institution, activity, and identity. Connections between religion and other social institutions and processes.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: SOC 134; STAT 101; or concurrent enrollment in STAT 101
Introduction to the principal research methods used in sociology, including survey research, interviewing, content analysis, experiments, ethnographies, focus groups, historical analysis, and analysis of secondary data. Instruction on sampling and the principles of validity and reliability underlying quantitative and qualitative methods. Training in data analysis using statistical software packages.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: SOC 134
Examination of human behavior in a social environment with emphasis on development of the self, interpersonal relations, attitudes, and small groups.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: SOC 134
Analysis of evolving theory and research of community as an ideal type, an ecological system, a political economy, and an interactional field; examination of the impact of economic, cultural, social and political infrastructures on community power structures and change processes in a global era.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


The impacts of agricultural changes on farm families, rural communities, and consumers. Past, present, and future trends in family farms and their social implications.

(Cross-listed with WGS). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: SOC 134
Develop a foundational understanding of the role of gender and sexuality in society. Students will explore the biological, social, and cultural meanings of gender and sexuality and their intersections with class, race/ethnicity, ability, socioeconomic status and other identities. Contemporary social science research, theories, and feminist perspectives as they relate to gender and sexuality, and explores gender and sexuality within families, education, the media, politics, and the economy.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with WGS). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: SOC 134 or WGS 201
Examination of socially constructed and idealized images of manhood, the nature of social hierarchies and relations constructed on the basis of imagery, ideologies, and norms of masculinity. Theories on gender (sociological, psychological, and biological). Particular attention given to theory and research on gender variations among men by race, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, physical ability and age.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with AF AM). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: SOC 134
Analysis of ethnic and race relations, particularly in America; emphasis on the sociology and psychology of race and ethnic relations.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: SOC 134
Social stratification and processes resulting in social and economic inequalities; implications of status, class, and poverty for people of different races, ethnicities, and gender.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: SOC 134
Examination of the social, historical, economic and political experience of varied Latino ethnic groups in the U.S. - primarily focusing on Mexican, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with POL S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: A course in political science or sociology
The relationship between politics and society with emphasis on American society. Discussion of theories of inequality, power, social movements, elites, ruling classes, democracy, and capitalism.

(Cross-listed with C J). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.SS.

Prereq: SOC 134 or C J 240
Theory and research on the etiology of types of social deviance; issues relating to crime, antisocial behavior and social policies designed to control deviant behavior.

(Cross-listed with ENV S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: SOC 134
Human population growth and structure; impact on food, environment, and resources; gender issues; trends of births, deaths, and migration; projecting future population; population policies and laws; comparison of the United States with other societies throughout the world.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. 3.

Prereq: SOC 134
Trends in hunger, poverty, resource use and development. Assessment of theories, policies, and programs to promote sustainable livelihoods, resource management, and development at local and national levels. Examine solutions through institutional efforts and grassroots social movements.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: 3 credits in social sciences or permission of instructor
Status of women farmers, workers, and consumers in US agriculture and the food system from a sociological perspective. Analysis of women’s identities, roles, and gender relations; and relationships among gender, class, race, and ethnicity.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with ECON). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: ECON 101 or SOC 134, junior or senior status in the College of Agriculture
Identify major ethical issues and dilemmas in the conduct of agricultural and agribusiness management and decision making. Discuss and debate proper ethical behavior in these issues and situations and the relationship between business and personal ethical behavior.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: SOC 134
Inequalities (gender, race, class) related to jobs, occupations, firms, and industries. Satisfactions, rewards, alienation, discrimination, and other topics of importance to workers are examined.

(Cross-listed with PSYCH). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: SOC 305 or PSYCH 280
A survey of small group theory and research from an interdisciplinary, social psychological perspective.

(Cross-listed with ENV S). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: SOC 134 or 3 credits of ENV S
Environment-society relations; social construction of nature and the environment; social and environmental impacts of resource extraction, production, and consumption; environmental inequality; environmental mobilization and movements; U.S. and international examples.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 9 credits in sociology
Both historical and modern social theories as applied to understanding and researching the social world.

(Dual-listed with SOC 510). (Cross-listed with WGS). Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: WGS 201 or 3 credits in WGS or W S at the 300 level or above.
Issues related to human trafficking and modern-day slavery in the US and world. History of and concepts defining forms of violence experienced by trafficking victims and methods used to recruit and control victims. Students will learn how to educate others about this crime against humanity. Examines international, federal, and state legislation to prevent human trafficking. Only one of WGS 410 may count toward graduation
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: SOC 134 plus 3 credits in social sciences
Social change and development in developing countries; international interdependence; causes and consequences of persistent problems in agriculture, city growth, employment, gender equality, basic needs; local and worldwide efforts to foster social change and international development.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: SOC 134 plus 3 credits in social sciences
Examination of public responses to complex and controversial innovations, such as environmentalism, feminism, stem-cell research, same-sex marriage, large-scale hog lots, and others. Strategies for gaining adoption/rejection of controversial innovations. Applications to topics in agriculture, development, business, and marketing. Credit for only Soc 415 or 515 may be applied toward graduation.

(Cross-listed with C J). Cr. 3-9. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Junior or senior classification; major or minor in criminal justice or sociology.
Study of the criminal and juvenile justice systems and social control processes. Supervised placement in a police department, prosecutor's office, court, probation and parole department, penitentiary, juvenile correctional institution, community-based rehabilitation program, or related agency. Assessed service learning component. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. No more than a total of 9 credits of 460 can be counted toward graduation.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.SS.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
Project-focused engagement in community issues and initiatives. A broad range of strategies will be addressed, including popular education, applied research, network analysis and mapping, policy focused work, action research, curriculum development, community organizing, and organizational development.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
The contemporary family in developing, industrial, and post-industrial societies. Effects of modernization, cultural change, and family policies on family dynamics, structures, and functions.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology and permission of instructor
Students in the College of Agriculture must be of junior or senior classification and may use no more than 6 credits of Soc 490 toward the total of 128 credits required for graduation. Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may count no more than 9 credits of 490 toward graduation.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology and permission of instructor
Students in the College of Agriculture must be of junior or senior classification and may use no more than 6 credits of Soc 490 toward the total of 128 credits required for graduation. Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may count no more than 9 credits of 490 toward graduation.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology and permission of instructor
Students in the College of Agriculture must be of junior or senior classification and may use no more than 6 credits of Soc 490 toward the total of 128 credits required for graduation. Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may count no more than 9 credits of 490 toward graduation.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology and permission of instructor
Students in the College of Agriculture must be of junior or senior classification and may use no more than 6 credits of Soc 490 toward the total of 128 credits required for graduation. Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may count no more than 9 credits of 490 toward graduation.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology and permission of instructor
Students in the College of Agriculture must be of junior or senior classification and may use no more than 6 credits of Soc 490 toward the total of 128 credits required for graduation. Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may count no more than 9 credits of 490 toward graduation.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduates:

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: SOC 401
The origins of the canonical works of sociology in the mid-Industrial Revolution period including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim and others.

(Cross-listed with AGRON, SUSAG). (3-4) Cr. 4. F.

Prereq: Senior or above classification; permission of instructor
Experiential, interdisciplinary examination of Midwestern agricultural and food systems, emphasizing both field visits and classroom activities. Focus on understanding multiple elements, perspectives (agronomic, economic, ecological, social, etc.), and scales of operation.

(Dual-listed with SOC 410). (Cross-listed with WGS). Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: WGS 201 or 3 credits in WGS or W S at the 300 level or above.
Issues related to human trafficking and modern-day slavery in the US and world. History of and concepts defining forms of violence experienced by trafficking victims and methods used to recruit and control victims. Students will learn how to educate others about this crime against humanity. Examines international, federal, and state legislation to prevent human trafficking. Only one of WGS 410 may count toward graduation
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: SOC 302 and STAT 401
Covers the philosophy and the techniques of research methods in sociology and other social sciences, including the ethics and politics of social science, validity issues, conceptualization and operationalization, sampling strategies, appropriate research designs for different questions, survey construction, and various data collection and analysis techniques.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: STAT 404 or with instructor's permission
Applied techniques of multivariate analysis includng cluster analysis, principal components and factor analysis, multivariate analysis of variance and covariance binomial and multinomial regression, multi-level random coefficient models, and spatial regression. Conceptual and mathematical grounding for nonstatisticians. Instruction in Mplus and SAS.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: SOC 511
Applied qualitative research methods in sociology. Design and implementation of a course-based research project including data collection, analysis, and presentation of results. Qualitative data gathering techniques using observational, historical, in-depth interviewing or content analysis approaches. Laboratory emphasis on completion of data gathering, analysis, and report writing.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: SOC 305 or PSYCH 280
Examination of cognitive, symbolic interaction, exchange, role-reference group, and dramaturgical approaches. Assessment of contemporary issues in social psychology.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
Analysis of racial and ethnic inequality in the United States and the world; focus on the implications of the changing world social and economic order for differences in racial and ethnic groups relative to wealth, status, and power; a critical examination of majority-group domination of minority groups in various societies.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
Analysis of racial and ethnic inequality in the United States and the world; focus on the implications of the changing world social and economic order for differences in racial and ethnic groups relative to wealth, status, and power; a critical examination of majority-group domination of minority groups in various societies.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
Analysis of racial and ethnic inequality in the United States and the world; focus on the implications of the changing world social and economic order for differences in racial and ethnic groups relative to wealth, status, and power; a critical examination of majority-group domination of minority groups in various societies.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: SOC 511 or equivalent
Linkages between socioeconomic development, space, and community in local and global contexts. Focus on economic, social, cultural, environmental, and spatial dimensions of communities. Presentation of conceptual models. Applications using data and methods.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
Critical examination of the causes and consequences of social stratification and inequality; classical theories, contemporary frameworks, and recent empirical studies; international stratification patterns.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
Project-focused community practice using diverse approaches and perspectives.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 graduate credits in sociology
Contemporary theories of social change, modernization, dependency, and development are critically examined; methodological issues identified; supporting research explored; applicability of theoretical models, concepts, and strategies to current national and international needs are evaluated.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
Seminar in social change and development.

(Cross-listed with SUSAG). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
Social organization of food and fiber production, processing, and distribution systems. Sociological comparison of conventional and alternative production systems; gender roles in agriculture and food systems; local, national and global food systems; perspectives on food and agricultural research and policy.

(Cross-listed with SUSAG). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
Social causes and social consequences of environmental problems. Interrelationship between social inequality and environmental inequality. Social construction and social experience of the environment. Contemporary developments in the social theory of the environment. International and domestic implications.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
Social construction of economic activity in non-industrial and industrial societies with special attention on variations of industrial societies (capitalism and socialism), economic globalization, and economic development. Interaction of economic systems with human values, ideology, organizations, work and individual welfare.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology
Discussion of current research and theory in crime and delinquency; topics include the purpose and role of law in social life; emerging theoretical directions in criminology; recent work on specific forms of criminality; controversies in the criminal justice system.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology; senior or graduate classification

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology; senior or graduate classification

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable.

Prereq: 6 credits in sociology; senior or graduate classification

(1-0) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Formal admission into the sociology graduate program
Introduction to the department, current graduate student policies at department and university levels, departmental administrative procedures. Required of graduate students. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Courses for graduate students:

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 graduate credits in sociology
Provides a review of modern sociological thought, issues, and controversies as they affect current research and discourse in the discipline.

(Cross-listed with A B E, AGRON, ANTHR, SUSAG). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Graduate classification, permission of instructor
Historical, biophysical, socioeconomic, and ethical dimensions of agricultural sustainability. Strategies for evaluating existing and emerging agricultural systems in terms of the core concepts of sustainability and their theoretical contexts.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: SOC 512 and STAT 404, or with instructors permission.
Specification, identification, and interpretation of structural equation models. Techniques include structural or path models, measurement or confirmatory factor models, structural models with latent variables, and multi-level structural models. Conceptual and mathematical grounding for non-statisticians. Instruction in AMOS, MPLUS, and SAS.

Cr. 1-8. Repeatable.