Management (MGMT)

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Courses

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 3200).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Introduces entrepreneurial approaches aimed at the identification, development and exploitation of technical and organizational innovations, the management of new product or process developments, and the effective management of new ventures. Focuses on mid-size to large corporations, especially in the manufacturing and service industries. Develops an awareness and understanding of the range, scope, and complexity of issues related to the creation of a corporate environment that is supportive of entrepreneurial endeavors as well as the effective implementation of technological and organizational innovations in corporate settings. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Introduction to management as a field and function within organizations. Provides an overview of what managers do in organizations, including how they deal with multiple stakeholders; make decisions about organizational goals, strategies, and structures that align with the external and internal environment; as well as how they lead and manage human resources effectively. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Introduction to the attitudes and behaviors of individuals and groups in organizations, as well as their antecedents: e.g., individual characteristics, interpersonal processes, manager and leader influences, and organizational characteristics and practices. Builds awareness of one's own and others' characteristics, attitudes, behaviors, and interpersonal and decision-making skills to improve as an employee and a manager. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Introduces the many aspects of ethical and responsible management in today's organization, including the ethical implications of business decision-making (and the implications of having multiple stakeholders); corporate social responsibility; ethical leadership and other leadership styles as they pertain to responsible management; and the role of corporate governance and ethical codes in developing and institutionalizing an ethical organization. Builds ethical decision-making strategies and awareness of one's own ethical leadership philosophy. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Developing competitive strategy and achieving competitive advantage in firms, including: industry analysis, generic strategies, hypercompetition, competing against time, and building distinctive capabilities. (Typically Offered: Fall)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 3810).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Introduction to the important role family businesses play in the domestic and global economies as well as the complex and unique challenges and opportunities encountered by such businesses and their family members and other employees. Explores best practices for successfully managing family businesses.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Explains complexities managers face when doing business in countries where political, legal, economic, and cultural systems are different and require making decisions about the change, innovation, or adaptation needed to successfully formulate strategies for entering and operating in international markets. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Examination of business problems and main issues concerning new ventures. Students work in teams to identify problems in growing and new firms. The emphasis is on analyzing and solving an existing business problem. Includes a field project, a report, and a presentation to a business owner. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

A consideration of the role of business in society. Critical analysis of ethical, managerial, and public issues as they affect the corporation. (Typically Offered: Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 3710
Surveys the literature relating to personality, individual differences, and management. Explores the significant implications of personality for important topics in human resource management, organizational behavior, and strategic management, as well as the other functional areas of business, including leadership, motivation, perception, decision making, organizational citizenship behavior, job satisfaction, and much, much more. Allows students to explore their own personalities using rigorous academic measurement scales and discover what academic research says about how personality is related to a variety of management topics. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 3700 or MGMT 3710
Introduces the theory and practice of negotiation (i.e., the art and science of securing an agreement between two or more interdependent parties) in a variety of settings, especially those faced by managers and professionals in organizations. Focuses on understanding the behavior of individuals, groups and organizations in the context of competitive situations, and the underlying interdependent relationships and processes. Builds analytical skills needed to discover optimal solutions to problems and a broad array of negotiation skills needed in order for those solutions to be accepted and implemented.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 4710
Designed to complement the required curriculum in the Human Resource Management (HRM) major. Explores a rotating selection of cutting edge and timely topics in the area of HRM, with an emphasis on the application of HRM knowledge and skills to the challenges facing today’s organizations. Develops an awareness and understanding of the range, scope, and complexity of issues related to managing human resources in the modern (and post-pandemic) organization. Opportunities to apply introduced HRM knowledge, skills, and tools through class projects and exercises.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 3700
Designed to complement the required curriculum in the Management (MGMT) major. Explores a rotating selection of cutting edge and timely topics in the area of management, with an emphasis on the application of managerial knowledge and skills to the challenges facing today's organizations. Develops an awareness and understanding of the range, scope, and complexity of issues related to managing in the modern (and post-pandemic) organization. Opportunities to apply introduced managerial knowledge, skills, and tools through class projects and exercises.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 3700 or MGMT 3710
Focuses on the practical application of leadership skills required in today's evolving business environment, including the need to effectively manage change. Develops through multiple hands-on activities an understanding of how leaders are able to inspire and lead their peers, direct reports, as well as themselves, and how leaders can create a culture that supports and inspires change within an organization. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 3710 and STAT 2260 and ENGL 2500
Introduces the field of human resource management (HRM) and its relevance to managers, employees, and organizational strategic goal achievement. Explains how HRM practices can be a source of competitive advantage for organizations and develops knowledge and skills in the functional areas of HRM, including job analysis, selection, recruitment, compensation, and training and development. Builds skills critical to HRM (and other) professionals, such as communication, feedback, and teamwork skills. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Junior classification or above and BUSAD 2030
Introduces the important topics of diversity, equity, and inclusion in organizations. Focuses on understanding dimensions of diversity and the importance of inclusion; effectively managing legal, ethical, media, and marketing issues in this area; and managing organizational change initiatives in this area. Builds students' abilities to work within and lead diverse teams and organizations and develops critical thinking about one's identity and equality of opportunity in organizations. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: COMS 1130 and ENGL 2500 and STAT 2260 and MGMT 3710
Focuses on evidence-based analysis of short- and long-term consequences of specific talent management practices on the organization and on society as a whole. Introduces, and provides hands-on experience with, measurement and analytic techniques applicable to business professionals. Builds knowledge and skills to describe, diagnose and improve processes pertaining to planning, recruiting, selecting, training, and developing talent in an organization as well as compensating, retaining, and managing the performance and careers of a diverse and talented workforce. (Typically Offered: Fall)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 4710
Introduces the fundamental elements of employee compensation and benefits (including strategies, structures, and practices), within the larger context of total rewards. Discusses impact of compensation and benefits on employee recruitment, retention, and engagement, the employer/employee relationship, as well as individual, organizational and societal returns. Provides tools and a holistic understanding to competently assess, manage and negotiate compensation and benefits, not only as a management/human resource professional but also as an employee (in any phase of their own compensation lifecycle). (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: ACCT 2150 and MGMT 4710
Introduces fundamentals of U.S. employment law necessary for human resource management. Topics include sources of employment law, classification of workers, lawful hiring practices, liability arising from harassment and discrimination, worker’s rights and duties, employment contract issues, and lawful termination of an employee. Builds knowledge and skills for effectively managing each of these areas. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 4710 and MGMT 4740 and MGMT 4750
Takes an experiential and holistic view to address human resource management (HRM) issues, especially in small and mid-sized companies. Project-based format includes partnering with local companies to understand, research, and propose evidence-based HRM solutions that support the organization's overall strategy and business needs. Requires consideration and application of multiple HRM perspectives including hiring, employee development and retention, performance management, compensation and benefits, legal considerations, etc. Emphasis on developing situation-specific solutions that integrate multiple HRM best practices. (Typically Offered: Summer)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Credit or enrollment in (ACCT 2850; ENTSP 3100; FIN 3010; MKT 3400; (MGMT 3700 or MGMT 3710); SCM 3010; MIS 3010); Senior classification
Examines why some organizations perform better than others, with an emphasis on how taking a holistic view of the organization and environment can lead to sustained competitive advantage. Evaluates how capabilities in various organizational functions can help enable and determine organizational strategy, and considers how strategic choices affect expectations of various functional areas and their interdependence. Emphasis on case analysis and discussion to build student competencies in the areas of internal and external analysis, complex decision-making, and the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of strategies. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Junior classification
Executives in nonprofits are recognizing the need to incorporate contemporary management skills into their organization and connect their organizations to related business. Executives in for-profit businesses interact with the nonprofit sector in business operations or in service as a board member for a nonprofit organization. Management practices that can be applied across lines in both nonprofit organization and for-profit businesses. Focus on the strategy, governance, management and leadership of nonprofit organizations and explore how this sector fits into the business landscape. (Typically Offered: Spring)

Credits: 1-3. Repeatable.

Prereq: Instructor Permission for Course

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduates:

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in MBA program or departmental permission.
Understanding human behavior in organizations and the nature of sustainable organizations from a managerial perspective. Special emphasis is placed on how individual differences, such as perceptions, personality, and motivation, influence individual and group behavior in organizations and on how behavior can be influenced by job design, leadership, groups, and the structure of organizations. (Typically Offered: Fall)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: ACCT 5010, FIN 5010, MGMT 5020, MKT 5010; (enrollment in MBA program or Permission of Department)
Ethical and social responsibilities of top managers in corporations. Topics include stakeholder management, corporate social responsibilities, strategies for sustainable development, pursuit of societal and corporate goals, board and chief executive leadership roles, governance reform and ethics, and executive leadership style and values. The presentation of course concepts is facilitated by the use of cases, discussion scenarios, and ethical dilemmas.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: ACCT 5010, FIN 5010, MGMT 5020, MKT 5010; (enrollment in MBA program or Permission of Department)
Critical analysis of case studies in strategic management with an emphasis on integrative decision making. Strategy implementation in light of the global, legal, economic, cultural, and political contexts of business.

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 5200X).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Management of venture creation and innovation at large and established organizations. New ideas, concepts, and techniques on how to stimulate and exploit innovative activities to make established firms not only more responsive and flexible, but also more proactive and opportunity-creating. Related approaches combine activities targeted at the individual, team, organization, industry, regional, national and global level. Introduction to how today's large and established corporations (1) identify, develop and exploit innovative opportunities, (2) manage product development processes, and (3) create, spin-in, spin-off and manage new innovative ventures. This case-based course introduces emerging, non-traditional, evidence-based approaches, such as agile product development, design-thinking, entrepreneurial leadership, entrepreneurial ecosystems, open innovation and blue-ocean strategies. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in MBA program or instructor permission
Theory and practice of negotiation in a variety of settings, while focusing on understanding the behavior of individuals, groups and organizations in the context of competitive situations. Team work and team building is integrated to better understand interdependent relationships and processes.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Applied overview of organizational leadership and teamwork, with special emphasis on the ability to successfully influence in a variety of contexts. Areas of emphasis include: research to better understand the influence process; leadership, followership, and management as a process; change and how to better lead and manage change in organizations.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Enrolled in MBA program
Introduces talent management as integral to the ongoing success of any organization, with a focus on contemporary, evidence-based approaches to effectively managing talent. Highlights best practices related to the capture, integration, and utilization of employee data for making decisions about talent and talent management practices, and builds practical skills related to the identification and development of talent. Intended for current managers from any functional background.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Master of Real Estate Development or Permission of Instructor
Introduction to the theory and practice of leadership and negotiation. Emphasis on the science of influencing and resolving conflict, and securing an agreement between two or more interdependent parties. Behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations in the context of demanding situations.

Credits: 2. Contact Hours: Lecture 2.

Applied overview of organizational leadership leveraging a 360 leadership evaluation, with special emphasis on the ability to be successful in a variety of contexts. The 360 leadership evaluation will form the foundation to create a leadership action plan. This will great assist in increasing one’s leadership effectiveness as the students' strengths and weaknesses discovered. (Typically Offered: Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Commercialization of new technology. Topics covered include market analysis, intellectual property, product development, feasibility analysis, and new business evaluation.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 3710 or MGMT 5020 or SOC 4200
Topics and issues in personnel management with a focus on the management of human resources in organizations. Current personnel practices, philosophies, and behavioral science research. (Typically Offered: Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Graduate Standing or Permission of Instructor
Critical analysis of case studies in strategic management with an emphasis on integrative decision making. Strategy implementation in light of the global, legal, economic, cultural, and political contexts of business.

(Cross-listed with ACCT 5820).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 5030 or permission
Duties, structure, and functioning of top management teams and corporate boards of directors. CEO/board tenure and succession planning, top management compensation, board committee composition, assessment of CEO and board performance, theories of corporate governance, management of the corporate strategic agenda, governance codes, international governance, and chairman/CEO duality. Case studies and contemporary issues discussed.

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 5830).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 5040 or permission of instructor
Key strategies, models, and tools to foster and drive organizational innovation. Analysis of industry dynamics, sources and types of innovations, timing of entry; formulation of innovation strategies; developing innovation portfolios and collaboration strategies, protecting innovation; implementing technological innovation strategy, including new product development and deployment strategy. Essential traits of innovative strategic leaders. Critical analysis and discussion of cases focused on entrepreneurship and innovation and project requiring hands-on practical application of course concepts.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Provides the opportunity for students to understand the role of the professional consultant, the issues facing the management consulting industry, the competencies of various management consulting firms, the nature and form of strategic consulting engagement, and the nature and scope of strategic change in business firms. Students will learn about management consulting functions and will practice the consultant role though cases and field studies.

Credits: 1-3. Repeatable.

Prereq: Instructor Permission for Course
For students wishing to do individual research in a particular area of management. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer)

Courses for graduate students:

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in MGMT PhD program
This course provides a philosophical introduction to the theoretical and empirical development of scientific knowledge. It focuses on a variety of basic problems common to the social sciences: the nature of explanation, the structure of theories, forms of knowledge, scientific laws, nature of theory and ethics. The purpose of the course is to help doctoral students define a research context by addressing the purposes, assumptions and primary components of scientific inquiry.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in MGMT PhD program
This seminar involves the examination of the core theories and perspectives in organizational theory, as well as their applications and extensions. This material addresses the fundamental rationale for organizations in modern society, basic processes of organizing and organizational structure, a consideration of inter-organizational relationships and the external environment, and a variety of factors that help determine organizational effectiveness.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: MGMT 6010
This course will offer a critical review of organizational decision making with respect to technology and innovation. Students will learn how technological change can alter the basis of competition; how competitive strategy drives technology investment decisions; how market-orientation should be the other backbone of technological innovation; and best practices of organizing and managing the new product development process to achieve strategic goals.

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in MGMT PhD program
The purpose of this seminar is to introduce behavioral science literature relevant to the study of behavior in organizational settings. The course will focus on the individual's role within organizations and cover topics such as individual differences, motivation, leadership, decision-making. Learning, risk taking, interpersonal relations, etc. Both theoretical and empirical contributions will be examined, with emphasis on integration of diverse theoretical perspectives.

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6050).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Critical review of theory and research in the field of strategic management. Introduction to representative conceptual and empirical research. Review theories that provide the foundation for management research, and review current research in associate research streams. The review will cover fundamental questions in strategy. Offered odd-numbered years. (Typically Offered: Fall)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6060).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in MGMT PhD program
Seminal readings, theoretical perspectives, and historical roots of Entrepreneurship research. A broad variety of core foundational theories, perspectives, and approaches are discussed.

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6070).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 2, Discussion 1.

Prereq: Enrollment in MGMT PhD program
Current theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches in entrepreneurship research. Current entrepreneurship research is inherently interdisciplinary such that we will draw on insight from scholars across a range of disciplines. Offered even-numbered years. (Typically Offered: Spring)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Advanced research seminar in human resources management. The scope and coverage of the seminar is designed to representatively reflect the important content areas in the field, and the major theoretical and empirical contributions in each area. The seminar will be decidedly research focused with discussions concentrating on critical reviews and evaluations of existing work, and the identification of potential directions for theory development and future research. Through reading assignments, weekly papers, and the development of a theoretical paper, students should gain an appreciation for the current status of theory and research, and begin to articulate major issues and challenges facing the field of human resources management. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6090).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in ENTSP or MGMT PhD program or permission of instructor.
Solid methodological foundation that will prepare you to be a productive producer and educated consumer of scientific research in the field of Management, Entrepreneurship, and other related disciplines. Introduction to numerous concepts and techniques with relevance to your future scholarship in this domain. Conceptual underpinnings necessary to appreciate the strengths and limitations of various approaches used in these fields and the interplay between theoretical advancement and rigorous empirical investigation. (Typically Offered: Fall)

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Foundation in micro research including domains of organizational behavior (OB) and human resource management (HR). Discuss classic micro topics (e.g., job performance), as well as topics that exemplify recent advances within the OB/HR literatures (e.g., big data). Multiple levels of analysis and consider how micro topics complement other areas of management research (i.e., entrepreneurship and macro topics). Theory and empirical research within the applied context of the OB/HR environment. Emphasize a systematic and scientific approach to deepening collective knowledge and understanding of topics. (Typically Offered: Fall)

Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Provide students with a deeper content knowledge of foundational and contemporary research on organizational resources and capabilities. Concepts (e.g., resources, capabilities, sustainable competitive advantage, knowledge, etc.) theoretical frameworks (e.g., Resource-based Theory; Dynamic Capabilities; Resource-dependency Theory; Knowledge-based view), and relevant findings in this area of research. Multiple levels of analysis and consideration of how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Theory and empirical research embedded within the applied contect of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening our knowledge and understanding of topics. (Typically Offered: Spring)

Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Provide a deeper content knowledge of leadership. Review major behavioral styles of leadership, as well as leader-follower relationships and a variety of other current leadership issues. Multiple levels of analysis and consideration of how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Theory and empirical research embedded within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening the knowledge and understanding of topics. (Typically Offered: Spring)

Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Provide content knowledge of research in teams within the field of management, broadly defined. Covers research on teams from the perspective of the input-mediator-output-input model, which considers teams as complex, dynamic, and adaptive systems. Discussion of questions concerning composition and structure, processes and emergent states, and multilevel as well as temporal dynamics. Consideration of teams in students' specific area of study (e.g., entrepreneurial teams, top management teams). Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6200DX).
Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Role as a scholar is more than publishing research. The purpose of scholarship is to add to usable knowledge - which means knowledge that can be used to solve real - world problems. To publish an article, students need to convince other scholars of the quality of their research. To create usable knowledge, you need to solve a problem that managers face and communicate that solution to managers. Most managers do not read academic journals, so the publication of an article does not guarantee that anyone who needs the knowledge will find it. Introduction an ideal form of scholarship that Andy Van de Ven calls 'engaged scholarship.' This form of scholarship requires the rigorous theory and methods by adds the additional component of connecting research to practitioners throughout the research process. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6200EX).
Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Provide skills and training necessary to navigate the professional landscape of the management and entrepreneurship fields. Discussion of effective academic writing, focusing on the discipline of management (but certainly applicable beyond this field). Blend of theory, research and practice focused on understanding one's role as a scholar, the implications of scholarly work, and successful advancement through career stages. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6200FX).
Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.
Repeatable, maximum of 2 times.

Provide skills and training necessary to navigate the professional landscape of the management/entrepreneurship fields. Includes topics such as research collaborations and networking, the peer review process, ethics, scholarly writing, presenting scholarly work, developing a research identity, understanding the research process, receiving and utilizing feedback, and navigating career milestones. Blend of theory, research, and practice focused on understanding one's role as a scholar, the implications of scholarly work, and successful advancement through career stages. (Typically Offered: Fall)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6200GX).
Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Provides a deeper understanding of research methodology. Introduces the fundamental concepts of Bayesian statistics as an advanced methodology to empirically investigate entrepreneurship and management phenome. Analytical topics include Bayes theorem, prior specification, likelihood functions, Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations, analysis diagnostics, and posterior distributions. Application topics include Bayesian point estimates, intervals, predictions and hypothesis tests. Contrasts Bayesian approaches with frequentist paradigms such as statistical null-hypothesis significance tests. Designed to complement knowledge of MGMT 6090 Organizational Research Methods. Focus on exercises and discussions regarding how to collect, analyze and interpret empirical data to develop and advance micro- and macro-level theories in management and entrepreneurship. (Typically Offered: Fall)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6200HX).
Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Provide a deeper content knowledge of social networks in organizational contexts. Cover conceptual foundations of the social network perspective, including how it fundamentally differs from other research perspectives. Explore important implications of various social network attributes and processes in the context of contemporary organizational scholarship. Discuss research design and empirical considerations associated with this perspective. Consider course topics from multiple levels of analysis and consider how these topics emerge across different areas (i.e., micro and macro) of management and entrepreneurship research. Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics. . (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6200IX).
Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Provide a deeper content knowledge of mergers and acquisitions (M&As). Cover various M&A topics (premiums, deal completion, CEO characteristics, post-merger integration, acquisition performance, etc.), theoretical frameworks, as well as relevant findings of M&A research. Consider course topics from multiple levels of analysis and consider how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6200JX).
Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.
Repeatable, maximum of 2 times.

Provide a deeper understanding of research methodology implications of artificial intelligence, machine learning and big data for management and entrepreneurship scholars. Introduce students to the fundamental concepts and emerging capabilities of artificial intelligence and machine learning and investigate their applications in the context of data collection, data analysis and communication of research findings. Explore broader implications of these technologies for the objects of management research: organizations and their members. Designed to complement knowledge students can gain in MGMT 6090 Organizational Methods and ENTSP/MGMT 6200GX Bayesian Alysis in management and Entrepreneurship Research. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6200KX).
Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Enrollment in the PhD Program
Provide skills and training necessary to navigate the professional landscape of the management and entrepreneurship fields. Explore how to successfully manage the R&R (revise and resubmit process) at scholarly journals. Discussion of the purpose and stages of the peer review process. Blend of theory, research, and practice focused on understanding one's role as a scholar, the review process and implications of reviewing, and successful advancement through career stages. (Typically Offered: Spring)

Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Provide content knowledge of social influence processes. Explore how status and stigma impact individual and team influence and conflict outcomes. Discuss how social influence individual characteristics such as political skill will influence these processes. Evaluate course topics from multiple levels of analysis ad consider how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research, Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Cross-listed with ENTSP 6200MX).
Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Provides content knowledge of business ethics, especially the variety of behavioral ethics. Offers an exposure to business ethics literature, experiments with blending different methodology with substantive content and develops interesting research questions related to business ethics & values. Evaluate course topics from multiple levels of analysis and consider how these topics emerge across different areas of management (micro and macro) and entrepreneurship research. Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics. (Typically Offered: Spring)

Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Provide content knowledge of macro topics in management, specifically corporate governance and upper echelons. Covers research related to agency theory, the role of the board of directors, executive compensation and incentives, upper echelons theory, CEO succession, CEO characteristics, and external governance (e.g., the role of social movement, media, shareholder activists). Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 1. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Provide content knowledge of employee participation. Explore how organizations encourage and foster employee involvement through the implementation of engagement-oriented policies and practices. Examine how these policies and practices motivate and empower individuals to be involved in the workplace, ultimately leading to participatory behaviors (voice, issue, selling, upward influence, etc.). Blend of theory and empirical research within the applied context of the management field. Emphasis on a systematic and scientific approach to deepening knowledge and understanding of topics. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

Credits: 1.

Prereq: Enrollment in ENTSP or MGMT PhD program
Preparation of a research manuscript to be submitted to a peer-reviewed academic journal. Students will work with a faculty mentor on a research project.

Credits: 1.

Prereq: Enrollment in ENTSP or MGMT PhD program
Preparation of a second research manuscript to be submitted to a peer-reviewed academic journal. Although students work under the supervision of a faculty mentor, the students will take independent responsibility for the research project.

Credits: 1-12.

Prereq: Department Permission for Course
Research.