U.S. Latino/a Studies Program (USLS)

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Courses

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

History and current lives of the Latino/a peoples in the United States, including Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and South and Central Americans, as well as information specific to Iowa Latino/as, will be covered. Through readings, class discussions, writing assignments, and guest speakers, students will acquire accurate information and a solid understanding of the US Latino/a population and cultural perspectives. Elements of Latino/a culture to be covered include historical, sociological, educational, psychological, economic, and political facets. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

(Cross-listed with SPAN 3050).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Instructor Permission for Course
Intensive study and application of grammar concepts in the development of writing and reading skills in a dynamic cultural context centered on Hispanics in the U.S. Designed for native or heritage Spanish speakers with oral proficiency in Spanish but with little or no formal academic training in the language. Taught exclusively in Spanish. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Dual-listed with ANTHR 5230A). (Cross-listed with ANTHR 3230A).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.
Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits.

Exploration of key contemporary and historical issues in Latin American Anthropology; discussion of current anthropological approaches to studying Latin American social issues in a global context. Topics vary each time offered. ANTHR 2010 or ANTHR 3060 recommended. Meets International Perspectives Requirement. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Dual-listed with ANTHR 5230B). (Cross-listed with ANTHR 3230B).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.
Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits.

Exploration of key contemporary and historical issues in Latin American Anthropology; discussion of current anthropological approaches to studying Latin American social issues in a global context. Topics vary each time offered. ANTHR 2010 or ANTHR 3060 recommended. Meets International Perspectives Requirement. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Dual-listed with ANTHR 5230C). (Cross-listed with ANTHR 3230C).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.
Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits.

Exploration of key contemporary and historical issues in Latin American Anthropology; discussion of current anthropological approaches to studying Latin American social issues in a global context. Topics vary each time offered. ANTHR 2010 or ANTHR 3060 recommended. Meets International Perspectives Requirement. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Dual-listed with ANTHR 5230D). (Cross-listed with ANTHR 3230D).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.
Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits.

Exploration of key contemporary and historical issues in Latin American Anthropology; discussion of current anthropological approaches to studying Latin American social issues in a global context. Topics vary each time offered. ANTHR 2010 or ANTHR 3060 recommended. Meets International Perspectives Requirement. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Dual-listed with ANTHR 5230E). (Cross-listed with ANTHR 3230E).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.
Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits.

Exploration of key contemporary and historical issues in Latin American Anthropology; discussion of current anthropological approaches to studying Latin American social issues in a global context. Topics vary each time offered. ANTHR 2010 or ANTHR 3060 recommended. Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(Cross-listed with SPAN 3250).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: USLS 2110
Analysis and discussion of interdisciplinary texts examining the local and regional Latino/a immigration experience. Exploring Latino/a culture through participation in a community project. Assessed service learning component. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Cross-listed with CJ 3330X).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Intersections of ethnicity, culture, assimilation, immigration/migration, crime, and the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics include: criminality among Latinos/as and the challenges they face within the CJ complex (cops, courts, corrections, as well as immigration and border control) situated within mass incarceration; the use of criminalization as a form of social control; and Latino/as' human and civil rights and the role that race, ethnicity, gender, class, and immigration status play in the criminal justice system and border control enforcement. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement. (Typically Offered: Fall)

(Cross-listed with POLS 3430).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Political institutions, processes, and contemporary issues. Selected countries examined intensively to illustrate generalizations. Role of parties, military, church, human rights, women, environmental issues, interest groups, ideology, and globalization. Meets International Perspectives Requirement. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer)

(Cross-listed with PSYCH 3470).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: PSYCH 1010; 1 additional PSYCH course
Historical, political, and social contexts of psychological and mental health constructs in terms of their validity and utility for use with Latino/a people in the U.S. Unique aspects of psychological functioning particular to Latino/a people in the U.S. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement. (Typically Offered: Spring)

(Cross-listed with LING 3510/ SPAN 3510).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: SPAN 3030A or SPAN 3030B or SPAN 3040
Introduction to the theory, methods, techniques, and problems of translation. Consideration of material from business, literature, and the social sciences. Taught in Spanish. Meets International Perspectives Requirement. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring)

(Cross-listed with CJ 3600).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Intersections of race/ethnicity, class, gender, culture, acculturation, and immigration/migration in the victimization experiences of Latina women interacting with criminal justice systems and services. Topics include: domestic/intimate partner violence, sexual assault, human trafficking among Hispanic, Latina, and Chicana women, and the impact of language barriers, abuser threats of deportation, social and institutional discrimination and racism, cultural norms, and cultural insensitivity among first responders and service providers on help-seeking, well-being, and interactions with the criminal justice system. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

(Cross-listed with HIST 3710).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
History of the Mexican American community in the U.S. from the 1820s to the present. Topics include community development, employment, social marginalization, racism/discrimination, depression and world wars, civil rights, ethnic power and politics. Offered even-numbered years. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement. (Typically Offered: Fall)

(Cross-listed with HIST 3720).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Historical and cultural heritage of Latinas/os in the United States. The histories of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Latin American peoples in the U.S. emphasizing political and cultural convergence and congruencies. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

(Dual-listed with EDUC 5200). (Cross-listed with EDUC 4200).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Introduction to research on bilingualism and examination of the social, historical, and political contexts of Spanish/English education in the U.S. Attention to policy environment, school program structure, mode of classroom instruction, family and community context, and attainment of bilingualism and biculturalism for Latinx youth. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement. (Typically Offered: Fall)

(Cross-listed with AFAM 4730/ HIST 4730).
Credits: 3. Contact Hours: Lecture 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Comparative history of the civil rights and ethnic power movements (African American, Chicano, American Indian, Puerto Rican, among others) in the U.S. from World War II to the present. Topics include institutional foundations, leadership, gender and racial dynamics, and the convergences and divergences of these differing ethnic struggles for rights. Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement.

Credits: 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits.

Prereq: Instructor Permission for Course
Independent study under supervision of instructor. Graduation Restriction: No more than 3 credits may count towards the U.S. Latino/a Studies certificate.

Credits: 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: Instructor Permission for Course
Supervised practice working with US Latino/a communities in the public or private sector, combined with academic work under faculty supervision. Graduation Restriction: Up to 3 credits may apply toward USLS minor. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. (Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer)