Political Science (POL S)

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Any experimental courses offered by POL S can be found at: registrar.iastate.edu/faculty-staff/courses/explistings/

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Courses

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

(1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.


Introduction to a variety of approaches to political questions. Relevance to career paths. For political science majors and others interested in exploring political questions. Recommended first semester of freshman year, or as soon as possible after declaring the major. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Fundamentals of American democracy; constitutionalism; federalism; rights and duties of citizens; executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government; elections, public opinion, interest groups, and political parties.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Dynamics of interstate relations pertaining to nationalism, the nation state; peace and war; foreign policy making; the national interest; military capability and strategy; case studies of transnational issues, such as population, food, energy, and terrorism.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Interactions between governments and citizens in countries outside the US. Causes of democracy, dictatorship, and economic and social development.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Moral controversies surrounding political issues such as violence, deception, corruption, civil disobedience, democracy, justice, equality, and freedom. Political applications of classic and contemporary texts.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Theory and method in empirical political science, with an emphasis on qualitative social-science methodologies. Research design, causal logic, and use of evidence. Content analysis, case studies, focus groups, and interviews.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Theory and method in empirical political science, with an emphasis on quantitative social-science methodologies. Research design, causal logic, and use of evidence. Regressions, experiments, and polls and surveys.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Introductory survey of public governance at the administrative and managerial levels of international, national, state, and local government. Essential issues and competencies involved in efficient, effective, and ethical provision of public goods and services. Relationships inside and across governments, social equity, public-private partnerships, and privatization.

(Cross-listed with ENV S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Introduction to how major ideologies address conservation and ecology. Processes, participants, and institutions involved in state, national, and global environmental policymaking. Case studies of environmental controversies and proposals for policy reform.

Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Sophomore classification; Department Cooperative Education Coordinator Permission
Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.


Political attitudes and behaviors of citizens in democracies, both in the US and cross-nationally. Citizens' traits and their relationship to democracy.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


The formation of political opinions and attitudes, political participation, and voting behavior of the general public, and their influences on American politics; polling as a means of assessing public opinions and behaviors.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Role of state and local governments in the American federal system. Structures of participation: political parties, elections, interest groups. Major governmental institutions: legislative, executive, and judicial. Structure and functions of local governments.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Methods and strategies of political campaigns in American elections. History of the electoral process and the transformation of American campaigns.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


American judicial system and controversies spanning law and politics. Potential topics include statutory construction, judicial review, proper role of the judiciary, vagueness and ambiguity in law, competing constitutional philosophies, executive branch concerns, and relative power of different branches. POL S 111 recommended. Only one of POL S 230, 319 may count toward graduation

(Cross-listed with C J). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.


An overview of the American judicial process. Emphasis on specific topics such as application of constitutional rights to the states (particularly the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments), mechanics of judicial opinions, constitutional philosophies of Supreme Court Justices, decisions of first impression, and the value and scope of precedent.

(Cross-listed with C J, RELIG). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.


A study of the role of religion in law and justice with a focus on the United States. Examines the history of religious freedom, key contemporary legal cases, and how religious-oriented justice movements engage ethics and the law.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Competing American conceptions of democracy as strategies for responding to the racial, religious, ethnic, gender, and economic diversity of America. Contemporary debates about topics such as immigration, affirmative action, multicultural education, religion, and minority representation.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with SOC). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: A course in political science or sociology
The relationship between politics and society with emphasis on American society. Discussion of theories of inequality, power, social movements, elites, ruling classes, democracy, and capitalism.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Examines the history and political dynamics of public science and technology policies. Examines differences in political and technological orientations. Assessment of the roles of politics, media, engineering, science, and private business in the formation of public policies that put heavy reliance on or seek to advance science and technology.

(Cross-listed with C J, PHIL). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Competing conceptions of liberty in American political thought. Debates about how liberty should be protected by the law, in fields such as health care, drugs, property, speech, religion, and sex.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Economic and political development as they relate to the political process of developing states. Impact of social and technological change on political systems of developing areas.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Legacies of Imperial China, the origins of the Chinese Civil War, and the causes and consequences of the reform era. Issues of contemporary China, including economic transformation, the structure of the Party/state, the environment, the media and other topics.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(Cross-listed with US LS). (3-0) Cr. 3.


Political institutions, processes, and contemporary issues. Selected countries examined intensively to illustrate generalizations. Role of parties, military, church, human rights, women, environmental issues, interest groups, ideology, and globalization.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


How agendas come to be set in public policy, theories describing the policy-making process, forces molding policy choices and the impact of such choices.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Comparative study of political institutions of Europe and the European Union; emphasis on parties, elections, and governmental structures. Substance and process of public policies in selected problem areas.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Political institutions and processes in Great Britain and Northern Ireland; emphasis on Parliament, executive and monarchy, and public policies, including devolution.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Nation-states of Central and Eastern Europe. Comparison of European communist systems and the revolutionary conflict leading to the dissolution of communist Europe. Political analysis of post-communist Russian and Eastern European nation-states and their economic, cultural and social variations.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Introduction to the Middle East as a region and to issues of political importance to the Middle East and its place in the world. Topics covered include political Islam, regional conflicts and alliances, local leaders, political economy, democracy, and human rights.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Political, economic, and social factors that affect immigration policy. Systematic analysis and implications of different types of immigration policies in countries sending and receiving immigrants. Policies regarding incorporation of migrants into, and effects of migrants on, American society.

(Cross-listed with ANTHR). (3-0) Cr. 3.


Humanitarianism as a system of thought and a system of intervention in conflict and post-conflict situations. Role of humanitarian organizations and actors in addressing human suffering caused by conflict or war. Military action as a form of humanitarian intervention.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Theoretical relationship among politics, strategy, and war. Evolution of war, the relationship between technology and conflict, and the changing causes and nature of global violence.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Introduction to essential theoretical concepts and approaches, both classical and contemporary on world politics including realism, empiricism, liberalism, and postpositivism; for example, war and conflict, peace and cooperation, political economy, crisis decision-making, systemic theory, dependence and interdependence.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Contemporary approaches in the security area including strategic deterrence, cybersecurity, environmental security, peacekeeping and terrorism. Current cases to illustrate policies as well as historical and theoretical choices.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


U.S. foreign policy since World War II with emphasis on changing American values in foreign policy, the role of the President, Congress, and the bureaucracy in policy making, and a survey of current foreign policy issues and problems.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Examination of contemporary U.S. foreign policy issues (e.g., U.S. policy in the Middle East; defense budgeting in the post-Cold War era; conventional and nuclear arms control policy). The course will explore alternate methods to analyze policy, survey the evolution of each issue, and discuss different policy alternatives.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Theory and practice of representation and deliberation in the legislative branch of the republic; operations of Congress in terms of its committees, leadership, legislative and oversight processes, partisan politics, electoral campaigns, service to local and special electoral campaigns, service to local and special interests, and interactions with the President.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Creation and historical development of the office of chief executive; character and behavior of past chief executives; selection and control; powers, roles, functions; executive staff; relations with Congress, press, public opinion.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Influence of mass media organizations, forms, techniques, and technologies on the practices and expectations of American politics. Role of media in the political process, including promoting or discouraging political participation. Politics of traditional journalism, devices of propaganda, effects of campaign advertising, and media spectacles.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Nature of political parties and interest groups, their relation to each other, and their effects on American politics. Topics include party identification, party organization and mobilization, factionalism, lobbying, campaign contributions and financing, and the effects of special interests on public law.

(Cross-listed with RELIG). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.


The interaction of religion and politics in the U.S. from both an historical and contemporary perspective, as well as the role of religion in politics internationally.

(3-0) Cr. 3.


Politics of international economic interaction. Trade wars and agreements, cross-border finance and multinational corporations, exchange rates and monetary policy, outsourcing, and development under conditions of globalization.

(Cross-listed with WGS). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Entry and participation of women in politics in the United States and other countries. Contemporary issues and strategies for change through the political process.
Meets U.S. Diversity Requirement

(Cross-listed with HIST, WGS). Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Evolution of the role and office of the First Lady in U.S. history, including her political activism, social impact, and international influence. Analysis of the authority, intersectionality, and agency of First Ladies in the aggregate and exploration of how individual First Ladies have interpreted and adapted this unique public position.

Cr. 1-4. Repeatable.


Selected topics in political science. A topic may not be taken more than once.

Cr. arr. Repeatable.

Prereq: Permission of Instructor
Supervised study in an aspect of discipline while traveling or located in a foreign country.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Junior classification; Department Cooperative Education Coordinator Permission
Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing work period.

(Dual-listed with POL S 501). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Scope and methods of political science. Introduction to theoretical approaches and analytical reasoning in political science. Relationship of theory and data. Research design.

(Dual-listed with POL S 507). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
An overview of the major theoretical approaches and empirical methods relevant to the study of public policy. Emphasis is placed on agenda setting, policy formation, policy sustainability, and policy analysis. Seminal writings by leading scholars will be reviewed. Leading quantitative and qualitative methodological tools for analyzing policy are presented.

(Dual-listed with POL S 508). Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
The implementation phase of the policy process, primarily within the government sector, with respect to specific programs, rules, or pieces of legislation within a larger policy area, e.g., health, environment, transportation, education, foreign policy.

(Dual-listed with POL S 509). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Application of economics to political science in the study of nonmarket decision-making. Behavior of bureaucrats, elected officials, and voters. Market failure, collective action, representative democracies, direct democracies, logrolling, voter paradoxes, and game theory.

(Cross-listed with SP CM). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: SP CM 212
Backgrounds of candidates for state and national elections; selected speeches and issues; persuasive strategies and techniques of individual speakers.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Judicial review, federal common law, judicial confirmation, strict construction of the Constitution, and qualifications to serving on Courts; judicial activism and the infusion of politics into courts.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Junior classification
Development of the United States Constitution through judicial action; influence of public law and judicial interpretations upon American government and society.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Junior classification
Leading Supreme Court cases interpreting the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Emphasis on religion, speech, privacy, due process, and equal protection.

(Dual-listed with POL S 522). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Legal aspects of international activities: state jurisdiction over territories and subjects, law of the sea, use of force, and judicial settlement of international disputes.

(Dual-listed with POL S 530). (Cross-listed with CL ST). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in POL S, HIST, or PHIL
Study of original texts in political thought ranging from the classical period to the renaissance. Topics such as justice, freedom, virtue, the allocation of political power, the meaning of democracy, human nature, and natural law.

(Dual-listed with POL S 531). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in POL S, HIST, or PHIL
Study of original texts in political thought ranging from the Reformation to the French Revolution and its aftermath. Topics such as justice, freedom, rights, democracy, toleration, property, power, skepticism, and normative views of international politics.

(Dual-listed with POL S 535). (Cross-listed with PHIL). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 6 credits in PHIL or POL S, or Permission of Instructor
Examination of theories of justice proposed by contemporary political philosophers. Analysis of the philosophical foundations of perspectives such as egalitarianism, libertarianism, and socialism. Normative assessment of social and political institutions.

(Dual-listed with POL S 543). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Energy policies and related social, environmental, and political issues. Energy problems and the impact of energy policies.

(Dual-listed with POL S 552). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Theoretical approaches to understanding foreign policy making and behavior through case studies of selected nations.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(Dual-listed with POL S 553). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Sources of international order in a variety of substantive areas such as international security, international trade and finance, the environment, and human rights: distribution of power, institutions, international law, and norms.

(Dual-listed with POL S 560). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Examination of policy-making and governance in a separation of powers system. Interaction between the chief executive, the legislature, administrative agencies, and the public. How political and legal forces affect policy makers and are reflected in public policies and programs.

(Dual-listed with POL S 574). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Integration, application, and utilization of public administration and public policy concepts in the interpretation of results and effectiveness of public programs and the prediction of consequences for policymakers and administrators.

(Dual-listed with POL S 575). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Literature and research on organizational behavior and management theory with emphasis on applied aspects of managing contemporary public-sector organizations. Distinctions between public and private organizations, leadership, productivity, employee motivation, organizational structure, and organizational change.

(Dual-listed with POL S 577). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Diverse perspectives on the changing roles and relationships of business, government, and society for more effective policy decisions on corporate affairs. The changing economy; transformation of workplace and community conditions; consumerism; social responsibilities of businesses; economic policies and regulations; politics in the business-government relationship.

(Dual-listed with POL S 580). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Study of decision making approaches and application to case studies. Topics such as the different roles of public officials, proper scope and use of administrative discretion, and the admissibility of religious, political, and philosophical commitments in governmental decision making.

(Dual-listed with POL S 587). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Impact of computers and the Internet on politics and policy. Positive and negative effects of information technology (IT) on selected topics such as hacking, cybercrime, cyberterrorism, cyberwarfare, privacy, civic participation, the sense of community, virtual cities, interest group behavior, viral media, campaigns, elections, and voting.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in POL S; Permission of Instructor
Special studies in the political institutions, processes and policies of American, foreign, and international governments. Also, studies in traditional and behavioral political theory. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. No more than 9 credits of Pol S 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in POL S; Permission of Instructor
Special studies in the political institutions, processes and policies of American, foreign, and international governments. Also, studies in traditional and behavioral political theory. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. No more than 9 credits of Pol S 490 may be counted toward graduation.

Cr. 3.

Prereq: 21 credits of POL S; Permission of Instructor
Written under the supervision of a Political Science faculty advisor.

Cr. R. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Graduating senior
Outcomes-assessment activities including job-placement surveys and evaluations of instructors, advisors, and courses. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 12 credits in POL S; Permission of Instructor
Undergraduate teaching experience through assisting an instructor with an introductory course in political science. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 12 credits in POL S; Permission of Instructor
Undergraduate research experience through assisting on a scholarly project with an instructor in political science. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Senior classification; Department Cooperative Education Coordinator Permission
Required of all cooperative education students. Students must register for this course prior to commencing each work period.

Cr. arr. Repeatable, maximum of 12 credits. F.S.SS.

Prereq: 6 credits in POL S; Junior or Senior classification; Internship Coordinator Permission
Work experience with a specific nongovernmental or governmental agency at the local, state, national, or international level, combined with academic work under faculty supervision. Use of credit in Pol S major and minor is limited. See Undergraduate Study for information. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduates:

(Dual-listed with POL S 401). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Scope and methods of political science. Introduction to theoretical approaches and analytical reasoning in political science. Relationship of theory and data. Research design.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science or graduate standing
Overview of major theoretical and empirical works in the study of international politics and foreign policy. Realism, liberalism, and constructivism; conflict, alliances, and international economic relations.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science or graduate standing
Foundations of comparative politics, the study of different political regimes. Political behavior, development, causes and consequences of democracy and authoritarianism. Contrasting research methods and designs.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in political science or graduate standing
Major theories and research on American government and politics. Modern democratic theory, institutional performance, and mass political behavior. Research methodologies including normative theory, behavioralism, and rational choice analysis.

(Dual-listed with POL S 407). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
An overview of the major theoretical approaches and empirical methods relevant to the study of public policy. Emphasis is placed on agenda setting, policy formation, policy sustainability, and policy analysis. Seminal writings by leading scholars will be reviewed. Leading quantitative and qualitative methodological tools for analyzing policy are presented.

(Dual-listed with POL S 408). Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
The implementation phase of the policy process, primarily within the government sector, with respect to specific programs, rules, or pieces of legislation within a larger policy area, e.g., health, environment, transportation, education, foreign policy.

(Dual-listed with POL S 409). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Application of economics to political science in the study of nonmarket decision-making. Behavior of bureaucrats, elected officials, and voters. Market failure, collective action, representative democracies, direct democracies, logrolling, voter paradoxes, and game theory.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: POL S 310
Comparative analysis of state political systems. Role of interest groups, political parties, legislatures, courts, and governors in state politics. Possible determinants of public policy outputs at the state level.

(Dual-listed with POL S 422). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Legal aspects of international activities: state jurisdiction over territories and subjects, law of the sea, use of force, and judicial settlement of international disputes.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: 6 credits in Political Science or graduate standing
An in-depth survey of the theoretical, empirical, and methodological works concerning mass political behavior in the United States. Substantive topics include political attitudes and ideologies, public opinion and voting behavior, and political psychology. Methods for studying mass behavior include survey research and experimental approaches.

(Dual-listed with POL S 430). (Cross-listed with CL ST). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in POL S, HIST, or PHIL
Study of original texts in political thought ranging from the classical period to the renaissance. Topics such as justice, freedom, virtue, the allocation of political power, the meaning of democracy, human nature, and natural law.

(Dual-listed with POL S 431). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: 6 credits in POL S, HIST, or PHIL
Study of original texts in political thought ranging from the Reformation to the French Revolution and its aftermath. Topics such as justice, freedom, rights, democracy, toleration, property, power, skepticism, and normative views of international politics.

(Cross-listed with CPR E, CYBSC). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Graduate classification; CPR E 531 or CYBSC 531
Legal and ethical issues in computer security. State and local codes and regulations. Privacy issues.

(Dual-listed with POL S 435). (Cross-listed with PHIL). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: 6 credits in PHIL or POL S, or Permission of Instructor
Examination of theories of justice proposed by contemporary political philosophers. Analysis of the philosophical foundations of perspectives such as egalitarianism, libertarianism, and socialism. Normative assessment of social and political institutions.

(Dual-listed with POL S 443). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Energy policies and related social, environmental, and political issues. Energy problems and the impact of energy policies.

(Dual-listed with POL S 452). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Theoretical approaches to understanding foreign policy making and behavior through case studies of selected nations.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(Dual-listed with POL S 453). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Sources of international order in a variety of substantive areas such as international security, international trade and finance, the environment, and human rights: distribution of power, institutions, international law, and norms.

(Dual-listed with POL S 460). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Examination of policy-making and governance in a separation of powers system. Interaction between the chief executive, the legislature, administrative agencies, and the public. How political and legal forces affect policy makers and are reflected in public policies and programs.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Graduate classification
Major theories of administrative organization, including motivations of administrators and organizations, comparisons of organizational arrangements, factors affecting organizational arrangements, and formal and informal decision-making structures.

(Dual-listed with POL S 474). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Integration, application, and utilization of public administration and public policy concepts in the interpretation of results and effectiveness of public programs and the prediction of consequences for policymakers and administrators.

(Dual-listed with POL S 475). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Literature and research on organizational behavior and management theory with emphasis on applied aspects of managing contemporary public-sector organizations. Distinctions between public and private organizations, leadership, productivity, employee motivation, organizational structure, and organizational change.

(Dual-listed with POL S 477). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Diverse perspectives on the changing roles and relationships of business, government, and society for more effective policy decisions on corporate affairs. The changing economy; transformation of workplace and community conditions; consumerism; social responsibilities of businesses; economic policies and regulations; politics in the business-government relationship.

(Dual-listed with POL S 480). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Study of decision making approaches and application to case studies. Topics such as the different roles of public officials, proper scope and use of administrative discretion, and the admissibility of religious, political, and philosophical commitments in governmental decision making.

(Dual-listed with POL S 487). (3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: Sophomore classification
Impact of computers and the Internet on politics and policy. Positive and negative effects of information technology (IT) on selected topics such as hacking, cybercrime, cyberterrorism, cyberwarfare, privacy, civic participation, the sense of community, virtual cities, interest group behavior, viral media, campaigns, elections, and voting.

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 2-5. Repeatable. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, written permission of instructor

Cr. 3-6. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science, permission of the instructor
Supervised internship with administrative agencies, legislative organizations, judicial branch offices, and nonprofit groups.

Courses for graduate students:

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable.

Prereq: 15 credits in political science

Cr. arr. Repeatable.