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Athletic Training

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This major prepares students for a career as an athletic trainer in a variety of settings such as high school, college and professional settings.  There are additional settings in sports medicine clinics, hospitals, military, industry, and in performing arts.  The accredited program is seeking CAATE approval for the degree change and students will be prepared for the Board of Certification exam upon graduation.  Admission to the athletic training program is competitive and based on available departmental resources. Admission procedures and technical standards can be found at http://www.kin.hs.iastate.edu/programs/athletic-training/#program-information-and-requirements.

Iowa State University's Athletic Training Program has transitioned to a Professional Master's degree program.  Undergraduate students will be enrolled in the 3+2 athletic training program with a 3-year Pre-Athletic Training undergraduate curriculum and a 2-year Masters of Athletic Training program in the Department of Kinesiology.  Students with a B.S. or B.A. degree may apply directly to the Master's program with completion of prerequisite coursework, program requirements, and observation hours.  For more information, please contact the program director, Dr. Mary Meier, at mary@iastate.edu. 

Mission

Athletic training is the art and science of the prevention, recognition, care, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.  It includes the organization and administration of athletic training education programs, as well as the education and counseling physically active individuals and athletes. The Iowa State University athletic training program provides high quality education striving to instill intellectual curiosity, evidence-based knowledge, and clinical skills essential for individual development.  The athletic training program enrolls academically qualified students who represent diverse socio-economic levels, ethnic heritage and who provide a gender balance.  The program faculty and clinical preceptors strive to prepare athletic training students to be productive and responsible citizens of the world and to foster affective, caring individuals to promote the profession of athletic training.

The Athletic Training faculty and clinical preceptors continually update educational curriculum to keep athletic training students current with field knowledge and to ensure the best possible undergraduate and graduate education in both the didactic and clinical settings.

Goals

  1.  We prepare athletic training students for the BOC Certification Exam.
  2.  We produce high quality athletic trainers prepared for employment in educational, clinical, and professional settings.
  3.  We promote professional and ethical conduct at all times.
  4.  We provide athletic training students equal opportunity to develop their skills both in the classroom and in the clinical settings.
  5.  We continually update the curricular offerings to provide the athletic training student current evidence based knowledge in the profession.
  6.  We provide high quality instruction in the classroom and clinical experiences.
  7.  We assist the athletic training student in gaining employment.
  8.  We promote the concept of establishing professional contacts by attending professional and educational meetings.
  9.  We foster an appreciation of athletic training as a component of sports medicine.
  10.  We foster the affective, caring side of athletic training.

Undergraduate Study

The Department of Kinesiology offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology & Health.  The B.S. in Athletic Training degree is only offered upon completion of the 3+2 B.S./M.A.TR. Athletic Training program.  The undergraduate curriculum major/option is comprised of three components:  general education, required departmental courses and the component courses.  The intent of the general education component is to promote intellectual and personal growth and to prepare students for success in the basic, advanced and major/option components.  Required courses provide an introduction to the field and fundamental principles of physical activity, fitness, health and disease.

B.S./M.A.TR. degree in Athletic Training

Certified Athletic Trainers are allied medical health care professionals who specialize in the prevention, assessment, diagnosis, emergency care, and treatment and rehabilitation of injuries.  To gain certification as an athletic trainer, candidates must graduate from a CAATE accredited athletic training education program and successfully pass the Board of Certification (BOC) examination.  In addition, most states have licensure requirements to practice athletic training.  The ISU Athletic Training undergraduate education program has been CAATE accredited since 2001 and as we transition to the new Professional Master's program, we are seeking CAATE approval for the degree change.  The Athletic Training program at Iowa State University includes various athletic training clinical rotations including high school settings, physical therapy and hospital clinics, college and university settings, surgical and emergency room observations, and immersive clinical opportunities in orthopedic and non-orthopedic settings. 

Curriculum in Athletic Training

This major prepares students for a career as an athletic trainer in high school, college or professional sport settings.  Additional settings include sports medicine clincis, hospitals, military, industry, and with the performing arts.  The 3+2 program prepares students for the Board of Certification exam upon graduation.  Admission to the Athletic Training Master's degree program is competitive.  Admission requirements for the Professional Master's in Athletic Training program can be found at http://www.kin.hs.iastate.edu/graduate-programs/athletic-training/.

Curriculum in Athletic Training

This major prepares students for a career as an athletic trainer in high school, college or professional sport settings.  Additional settings include sports medicine clinics, hospitals, military, industry, and with the performing arts.  The 3+2 program prepares students for the Board of Certification exam upon graduation.  Admission to the Athletic Training Master's degree program is competitive.  Admission requirements for the Professional Master's in Athletic Training program can be found at http://www.istatesportsmed.com/

Communication Proficiency

In order to meet graduation requirements, all students must earn an average of C (2.0) or better in ENGL 150 and ENGL 250, with neither grade being lower than a C-. Students not meeting this condition must earn a C or better in an advanced writing course:

ENGL 302Business Communication3
or ENGL 314 Technical Communication
LIB 160Information Literacy1
SP CM 212Fundamentals of Public Speaking3

U.S. Diversity and International Perspectives

In order to meet graduation requirements, all students must complete 3 cr. of course work in U.S. Diversity and 3 cr. in International Perspectives. See university approved list.

General Education

Physical and Life Sciences:

BIOL 255Fundamentals of Human Anatomy3
BIOL 255LFundamentals of Human Anatomy Laboratory1
BIOL 256Fundamentals of Human Physiology3
BIOL 256LFundamentals of Human Physiology Laboratory1

Additional major-specific requirements are:

CHEM 163College Chemistry4
or CHEM 177 General Chemistry I
CHEM 163LLaboratory in College Chemistry1
or CHEM 177L Laboratory in General Chemistry I
FS HN 167Introduction to Human Nutrition3
PHYS 111General Physics4-5
or PHYS 115 Physics for the Life Sciences

Mathematics and Statistics:

From the following:3-4
College Algebra
Preparation for Calculus
Applied Trigonometry
Calculus I
From the following:3-4
Principles of Statistics
Introduction to Statistics

Social Sciences: 9 cr. min required

PSYCH 101Introduction to Psychology3
or PSYCH 230 Developmental Psychology
SOC 134Introduction to Sociology3

Humanities: 6 cr. min required

Choose from department approved list.

Communications:

ENGL 150Critical Thinking and Communication3
ENGL 250Written, Oral, Visual, and Electronic Composition3
LIB 160Information Literacy1
SP CM 212Fundamentals of Public Speaking3
One of the following3
Business Communication
Technical Communication
Business and Professional Speaking

Program requirements:

The following courses are required in all majors and options:

H S 110Personal and Consumer Health3
H S 350Human Diseases (*)3
KIN 252Disciplines and Professions in Kinesiology and Health1
KIN 253Orientation and Learning Community in Kinesiology and Health1
KIN 258Principles of Physical Fitness and Conditioning2
KIN 358Exercise Physiology (*)3
KIN 359Exercise Physiology Lab1

Courses for Athletic Training Major

Option Requirements:
A TR 219Anatomy Clinical Practicum1
A TR 220Basic Athletic Training2
A TR 221Pre-Athletic Training Clinical Practicum1
A TR 223Preseason Clinical Experience Practicum1
A TR 425Organization and Administration of Athletic Training3
A TR 450Medical Concerns for the Athletic Trainer3
A TR 488Evidence Based Practice in Athletic Training2
A TR 489Review of Athletic Training Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies1
H S 215Drug Education3
KIN 355Biomechanics (*)3
KIN 365Sport Psychology (*)3
or KIN 366 Exercise Psychology
KIN 480Functional Anatomy3
Electives3
Total Credits29

Athletic Training B.S./Masters (B.S./M.A.T.R.) Degree
Sample Five-Year Plan

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
A TR 2180.5A TR 2180.5 
BIOL 255*3BIOL 256**3 
BIOL 255L*1BIOL 256L**1 
ENGL 1503FS HN 1673 
H S 1103H S 2153 
KIN 2521SOC 1343 
KIN 2531STAT 101 or 1043-4 
LIB 1601  
PSYCH 101 or 2303  
 16.5 16.5-17.5
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
A TR 219*1A TR 217**1 
A TR 221*1CHEM 163 or 1774 
A TR 220*2CHEM 163L or 177L1 
BIOL 2113KIN 2582 
BIOL 211L1PHYS 111 or 1154-5 
ENGL 2503SP CM 2123 
Humanities Choice/US Diversity3Humanities Choice/International Perspectives3 
Social Science Choice3  
 17 18-19
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
A TR 223*1A TR 328**1A TR 5011
A TR 228*3FS HN 3671A TR 5023
A TR 229*1H S 3503A TR 5092
ENGL 302, 314, or SP CM 3123KIN 3723A TR 5201
KIN 3553KIN 480 or B M S 4483-4 
KIN 3583MATH 140, 143, 145, or 1653-4 
KIN 3591PSYCH 4603 
KIN 365 or 3663  
Apply for admission to the AT/MATR program by November 15.    
Acceptance into the program is required before spring of the third year.   
 18 17-19 7
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
A TR 505*3KIN 501**3A TR 5152
A TR 510*3A TR 513**3A TR 5231
A TR 521*1A TR 522**1A TR 5392
A TR 519*2A TR 529**2A TR 5502
 A TR 545**3A TR 5603
 9 12 10
Fifth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits 
A TR 570*3A TR 575**3 
KIN 515, 550, or 572 (KIN Elective)3A TR 524**1 
A TR 559*5A TR 569**5 
 11 9

Expand all courses

Athletic Training Courses

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: A TR 221, A TR 222, Permission of Athletic Training Program Director
Athletic training clinical experiences for pre-athletic training students. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 0.5. Repeatable, maximum of 1 credits. F.S.


Pre-athletic training clinical experience designed to orientate students to the athletic training profession prior to enrolling in athletic training course sequence. Students will observe athletic trainers in various athletic training clinical sites. Open to pre-athletic training students only. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.


Athletic training clinical experiences designed to review human anatomical structures including origin, insertion, action, innervations of muscles. Students will gain experience with palpation of these structures to help identify location of anatomical landmarks. Students will also gain experience identifying bones, ligaments, and tendons. Open to athletic training students only.

(1-2) Cr. 2.

Prereq: BIOL 155 or BIOL 255 and BIOL 256
Introduction to methods of prevention and immediate care of athletic injuries. Basic information concerning health supervision of athletes, and some basic wrapping and strapping techniques for common injuries. Non A TR majors only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Credit or enrollment in A TR 222
Athletic training clinical observation experiences to accompany A TR 222. Utilize knowledge to evaluate, analyze and demonstrate appropriate taping, wrapping and basic skill techniques. Open to students interested in the athletic training option. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: BIOL 255, BIOL 255L
Provides pre-athletic training students with the knowledge of the profession of a certified athletic trainer, factors associated with injury prevention, treatment, emergency care of athletic injuries, protective equipment, basic organization, administrative, and legal concepts in the athletic training setting. To be taken concurrently with A TR 221.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Permission of Athletic Training Program Director
Athletic training clinical experiences for athletic training students during pre-season intercollegiate football. Clinical experiences include: Professional Rescuer CPR, AED certification, emergency splinting and spineboarding, medical record keeping and HIPPA regulations, environmental conditions, prevention of injury screening strategies, athletic training room and education program policies and procedures, review of athletic taping techniques, acute injury management, mouthpiece formation, and anatomy review. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(2-3) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Sport injury assessment procedures and evaluation techniques for lower body injuries. Includes an overview of mechanisms of injury, general musculoskeletal disorders, and spine or neurological dysfunction. Designed for students in the athletic training major.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Athletic training clinical experience to accompany A TR 224. Open to students in the athletic training major. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(2-3) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Sport injury assessment procedures and evaluation techniques for lower body injuries. Includes an overview of common illnesses of athletes and sport specific injuries. Designed for students in the athletic training major.

(0-3) Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Athletic training clinical experience to accompany A TR 226. Open to students in the athletic training major. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: BIOL 255, BIOL 255L, BIOL 256, BIOL 256L, Permission of Athletic Training Program Director
Assessment procedures and evaluation techniques for upper and lower body orthopedic conditions and injuries. Includes an overview of mechanisms of injury, general musculoskeletal disorders, spine or neurological dysfunction.

Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in A TR 228. Permission of Athletic Training Program Director.
Pre-Athletic training clinical experiences designed to orientate students to the assessment and evaluation principles of upper and lower body orthopedic conditions and injuries. Pre-athletic training students will observe athletic trainers in various athletic training clinical sites. Concurrent enrollment in A TR 228. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Basic information and laboratory instruction regarding basic taping techniques, athletic equipment fitting procedures, and the use and proper fitting of prophylactic braces. Open to students in the athletic training major. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Theory and technique of therapeutic modalities used in the management of injuries.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Athletic training clinical experience to accompany A TR 323. Open to students in athletic training major. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(2-2) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Theory and practical application of rehabilitation principles used in the management of athletic injuries.

(0-3) Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Athletic training clinical experience to accompany A TR 326. Open to students in the athletic training major. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 1.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Athletic training clinical experiences for pre-athletic training students. Clinical experiences include: prevention of injury screening strategies, athletic training room and education program policies and procedures, review of athletic taping techniques, acute injury management, and anatomy review. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director, senior classification
Current administrative, professional, and legal issues pertaining to athletic training. Job search techniques and strategies including preparation of materials for athletic training students.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Current medical issues and concerns, including pathology of illness and injury, dermatological conditions, exposure to allied health care professionals, and pharmacological indications in relation to the profession of athletic training and in patient/athlete care.

Cr. 2. F.S.

Prereq: Permission of athletic training program director
Clinical experiences in application of athletic training techniques under the supervision of certified athletic trainers. Introduction and utilization of evidence-based practice methodology via online instruction and integration of evidence-based practice into the clinical experience.

Cr. 1. F.S.

Prereq: Senior classification, permission of athletic training program director
Preparation for professional endorsement and certification by review of required competencies and clinical proficiencies. Required for endorsement or approval to sit for Board of Certification Exam. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduates:

(0-3) Cr. 1.

Prereq: Acceptance into Athletic Training program
Methods to select, fabricate, and/or customize prophylactic, assistive, and restrictive devices, material, and techniques into plan of care (durable medical equipment, orthotic devices, taping, bracing, splinting, protective padding, and casting). Methods of taping and wrapping for injury care, prevention of injury, and return to play. Exposure to different brands of bracing, how to fit a brace, and their use as well as casting techniques. Discussions of when to refer for prosthetics and overview of gait training.

(2-2) Cr. 3. SS.

Prereq: Acceptance into Athletic Training program
Development, implementation, and revision of policies pertaining to the prevention, preparedness and response to medical emergencies and other critical incidents. Evaluate and manage patients with acute conditions including triaging conditions and internal/external hemorrhage. Cardiac, respiratory, and cervical spine compromise.

(2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: A TR 502, A TR 520, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Knowledge and skills to utilize a variety of therapeutic modalities. Detailed understanding of the psychological and physiological process of pain, healing and a problem-based approach to apply theories, principles, and techniques of thermal, electrical, mechanical, light, and alternative therapies (laser, cryotherapy). Incorporation interventions (for pre-, post-, and non-surgical conditions) designed to address a patients' identified impairments, activity limitations, injuries, and participation restrictions. Home care to include self-treatment, soft tissue techniques.

Cr. 2. SS.

Prereq: Acceptance into Athletic Training program
Clinical experiences under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer. Techniques and clinical skills provided in both the clinical and classroom settings including: Special Olympics, emergency room rotation, environmental conditions, off season practice and conditioning sessions, biometrics/physiological monitoring systems and translation of data into effective preventative measures, clinical interventions, and performance enhancement. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: A TR 502, A TR 520, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Proper methods of musculoskeletal evaluation of the lower extremity. Evaluate and manage patient (s) with acute conditions including triaging conditions that are life threatening or otherwise emergent. Obtain a medical history, proper methods of documentation, patient overview, identification of comorbidities, assessment of function, selection and use of special tests and measures assessing patient’s clinical presentation, evaluation of all results to determine a plan of care, including referral when warranted. Selection and incorporations of interventions designed to address a patient’s identified impairments, activity limitations, and participation restriction.

(2-2) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: A TR 510, A TR 521, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Instruction on the proper methods of musculoskeletal evaluation of the upper extremity, thorax, spine, and head. Evaluate and manage patient (s) with acute conditions including triaging conditions that are life threatening or otherwise emergent. Obtain a medical history, proper methods of documentation, patient overview, and determination of participation status (PPE), identification of comorbidities, assessment of function, selection and use of special tests and measures assessing patient's clinical presentation, evaluation of all results to determine a plan of care, including referral when warranted. Selection and incorporations of interventions designed to address a patient's identified impairments, activity limitations, and participation restriction.

(2-0) Cr. 2. SS.

Prereq: A TR 522, A TR 545, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Principles of evidence-based practice, search for evidence, grading and evaluating literature. Use of systems of quality assurance and improvement to enhance patient care, search, retrieve, and incorporating the use of contemporary principles and practices information from health informatics for clinical decisions and communication with patients/clients, family members, coaches, administrators, other healthcare providers, consumers, payors, and/or policy makers. Use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) as a framework for delivery and communication about patient care.

Cr. 2. F.

Prereq: A TR 510, A TR 521, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Clinical experiences under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer with client/patient populations in competitive, recreational, individual and team activities, high and low intensity activities, non-sport client/patient populations, different sexes and throughout the lifespan (pediatric, adult, elderly). Real client/patient interactions as well as assessment of clinical component procedures and policies. Clinical hours occur in a variety of settings with patients and the student will complete the clinical hours that may extend prior to and/or beyond the academic semester end date. Clinical opportunities provide a basis for evaluating the athletic training student’s clinical progression through the program. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(1-0) Cr. 1. SS.

Prereq: Acceptance into Athletic Training program
Introduction to athletic training program and to explore the following topics: environmental issues and concerns, wound care/closure, fractures/dislocations, hemostatic agents/tourniquet applications. Blood borne pathogen training, communicable and infectious disease prevention, FERPA/HIPAA, concussion/brain injury with consideration of established protocols including: comprehensive examination, recognition, and treatment, implementation of a plan of care, referral, and return to participation. Use of C3Logic, Impact testing, and other methods will be introduced. Ankle and knee injury focus.

(1-0) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: A TR 502, A TR 520, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Procedures on how to obtain via the appropriate team physicians and medical staff the necessary and appropriate diagnostic tests (including imaging, bloodwork, urinalysis, electrocardiogram) to facilitate diagnosis, referral, and treatment planning. Surgical observation experience including pre-, post- care designed to address a patient/s identified impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. Shoulder and lower back injury focus.

(1-0) Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: A TR 510, 521, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Explore other allied health professions and interprofessional collaboration for optimal patient care and referral. Total patient care and how different professions can impact the care will be explored and discussed. Participation in roundtable discussions with other interprofessional health professions and students are exposed to foundational behaviors of professional practice including but not limited to: work/family balance, ethics, mentorship, leadership, professional involvement, and promotion of the profession.

(1-0) Cr. 1. SS.

Prereq: A TR 522, A TR 545, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Training and exposure in cupping, graston or ASTM technique for soft tissue mobilization, and dry needling. Case study analysis utilizing previous coursework including individual self-assessment of clinical skills.

(1-0) Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: A TR 515X, A TR 550X, A TR 565X and permission of the Athletic Training Program Director
Assess the athletic training students’ mastery of knowledge and clinical skills in athletic training, prepare students for employment, and self-assessment. Case study covering all of the domains of athletic training and demonstrates interprofessional and interdisciplinary connections. Review of all of the athletic training domains via specific exams (written, simulation and computer based) will be utilized to prepare the student to challenge the BOC examination.

Cr. 2. S.

Prereq: A TR 510, A TR 521, A TR 519, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Clinical experiences under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer where foundational behaviors of professional practice with emphasis being placed on evaluation of clinical skills. Reinforcement and instruction about therapeutic modalities, upper and lower extremity assessments. Clinical hours occur in a variety of settings with patients and the student will complete the clinical hours that may extend prior to and/or beyond the academic semester end date. Clinical opportunities provide a basis for evaluating the athletic training student’s clinical progression through the program. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 2. SS.

Prereq: A TR 522, A TR 545, A TR 529, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Clinical experiences under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer. Advanced issues in the athletic training profession with emphasis on practical application and professional development. Utilization of evidenced based research and approaches to clinical practice with emphasis placed on lab reports, imaging results, life-span issues, and diverse patient populations. Foundational behaviors of professional practice and emphasis will focus on evaluation, treatment, rehabilitation, and clinical skills. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(2-2) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: A TR 510, A TR 521, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Therapeutic and corrective exercise, joint mobilization, soft tissue techniques, movement training (including gait training), motor control/proprioceptive activities, task-specific functional training, home care including self-treatment and exercise, cardiovascular training. Pre, post, and non-surgical conditions and addressing activity limitations, participation restrictions and return to play guidelines.

Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: In addition to the study abroad application requirements, students must be accepted into their intended program, junior classification or graduate student majoring in Athletic Training, minimum GPA of 3.0, and completion of A TR 220, or A TR 228 and A TR 229.
Preparation for a study abroad experience that is focused on the discipline of athletic training in another country. Pre-travel for A TR 549B study abroad experience.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. 2. SS.

Prereq: Accepted to study abroad by the A TR Program Director and passing A TR 549A.
First-person perspective into the athletic training profession in another country as well as provide enrichment experiences related to the history and culture of that country. Follow-up course and experience of one credit A TR 549A which was intended to prepare the student for the study abroad experience.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(2-0) Cr. 2. SS.

Prereq: A TR 522, A TR 545, acceptance into Athletic Training program
General medical and pharmacological issues generally found in the field of athletic training. Medications used to treat medical conditions and the ability to educate patients regarding appropriate pharmacological agents for the management of their condition, including indications, contraindications, dosing, interactions, and adverse reactions. Administration of medications by the appropriate route upon the order of a physician or other provider with legal prescribing authority.

Cr. 5. F.


Course monitors student progression of athletic training proficiencies, acquiring clinical skills under the direct supervision of a certified A TR. Reinforce and instruct new info about general medical conditions and administrative topics and begin the immersive clinical experience required prior to graduation. Field experience provides immersive and additional athletic training experiences and clinical responsibilities for a minimum two 5 week rotations under the direct supervision of a certified A TR or allied health care professional. Required to complete a minimum of 25 hrs per week of field clinical experience. Site approved by the preceptor and A TR program director prior to beginning the immersion clinical experience. Clinical experience may extend beyond the academic semester end date and the clinical hours are a component of this course. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(3-0) Cr. 3. SS.

Prereq: A TR 522, A TR 545, acceptance into Athletic Training program
Medical issues generally observed in the athletic training profession. Development and implementation of wellness strategies to mitigate the risk for long-term health conditions across the lifespan and in an active population. Topics including dermatology, mental illness, neurological disorders, pulmonary disease, respiratory infections, viral infections, autoimmune disorders, oncology, gastrointestinal conditions and sexually transmitted infections. Identify, refer, give support to patients with behavioral health conditions; educate clients/patients about effects, participation consequences, risks of misuse and abuse of alcohol, performance-enhancing drugs/substances; and over the counter, prescription and recreational drugs including drug testing policies and procedures.

Cr. 5. S.

Prereq: A TR 565X, permission of Athletic Training Program Director
Cumulative clinical experience to gain a more in-depth experience in the field of athletic training. Student selects a field or site experience that meets their professional goals. Field experience is designed to provide immersive and additional athletic training experiences for a minimum of 10 weeks under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer. Site approved by the preceptor and A TR program director prior to beginning the immersion clinical experience. Required to complete a minimum of 25 hours per week of field experience. Clinical experience may extend beyond the academic semester end date and the clinical hours are a component of this course. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: A TR 515X, A TR 550X, A TR 560X and acceptance into Athletic Training program
Basic understanding of injury and sport psychology and its application to the overall health and well-being of athletic and general population clients. Psychological, social, socio-economical, and environmental factors that influence a client/patient and in their injury susceptibility, reaction, immediate care, and adherence to rehabilitation will be explored. Assessment and intervention techniques to promote and facilitate rehabilitation in a variety of professional settings and with patients from different backgrounds and social issues that may impact a patient. Overview of special populations (adolescent, female, special populations of athletes/physically active patients). Foundational behaviors of professional practice and working with other allied health care professionals in the overall health and well-being of a patient will be explored.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: A TR 565X, concurrently enrolled in A TR 569X
Knowledge and skills necessary for the administration aspect of an athletic training program. Course content includes but is not limited to: PPEs, how to manage physical, human, and financial resources in the delivery of healthcare services. Discussion of patient and insurance management, working relationships with interprofessional members of the health care team, policies and procedures for guidance in the daily operation of athletic training services including EAP or other critical incidents (concussion or other brain injuries), patients in behavioral health crisis, record keeping, athletic training facility design, resume development, and administrative/leadership skills and mentoring.

Dance Courses

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.


Introduction and practice of basic dance concepts, including preparatory techniques and guided creativity problems. No previous modern dance experience required. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.


Introduction to the basic skills, vocabulary, and tradition of ballet with concentration on control and proper alignment. No previous ballet experience required. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.


Introduction to the modern jazz style with concentration on isolation and syncopation. No previous jazz experience required. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.


Instruction and practice in basic tap technique and terminology. No previous tap experience required. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.


Instruction and practice in foxtrot, waltz, swing, cha cha, rhumba, tango, and selected contemporary dances. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 0.5-2. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. S.

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Advance registration required. Continued instruction and practice in either modern dance, recreational dance, ballet, jazz and/or compositional skills. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(1-3) Cr. 1. S.


Skill enhancement, teaching, progressions with emphasis on world and social dance. Designed for kinesiology and health majors, open to others.

(1-3) Cr. 2. F.

Prereq: DANCE 120 or previous modern dance experience
Theory and practice of the creative skills involved in solo and small group composition.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: DANCE 120 or previous modern dance experience
Dance techniques emphasizing strength, balance, endurance, rhythmic activity and extended combinations.

(0-3) Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: DANCE 222
Continued experience in dance techniques and extended combinations. Emphasis on maturation of skill and artistry. Exposure to a variety of modern dance technical styles.

(Cross-listed with THTRE). (0-3) Cr. 0.5-2. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: By audition only
Choreography, rehearsal, and performance in campus dance concerts and/or musical theatre productions. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: Previous ballet experience
Technical skills in the classical movement vocabulary. Emphasis on alignment, techniques, sequence development, and performing quality.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: DANCE 232
Concentration on technical proficiency at the intermediate level. Pointe work and partnering opportunities available.

(0-3) Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: Previous jazz dance experience
Dance concepts within the jazz idiom. Instruction in extended movement sequences and artistic interpretation.

(0-2) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.


Mixed-level Hatha Yoga class that emphasizes Iyengar style yoga. Yoga Movement is designed for developing awareness and personal practice with yoga poses and relaxation techniques. Attention will be paid to postural alignment to safely develop strength, endurance, flexibility, balance, and reduce stress. The practice develops awareness and consciousness in the physical body to help unite body and mind. Class will include introduction to other somatic practices, asanas (poses), breathing practices, meditation, yoga philosophy and deep relaxation.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Introduction to the many forms and functions of dance in world cultures. Develop abilities to distinguish and analyze various dance styles. No dance experience required.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(2-2) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: DANCE 220
Intermediate composition based on the relationship of movement to improvised sounds, rhythmic scores, and the musical works of composers from various periods.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: DANCE 270
Study of the history of dance from early to modern times with emphasis on the theories and philosophies of contemporary modern dance, dancers, and dance educators.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 8 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 2 credits in dance
Advance registration required. Designed to meet special interests and talents of students to include both group and independent study in various aspects of dance as a performing art including production, choreography, and performance.

(1-3) Cr. 2. S.


Content, experiences, and methods of a comprehensive dance program at the elementary school level. Theories and practice in guiding elementary school children in expressive movement experiences.

(1-3) Cr. 2. F.


Methods and techniques of teaching social and world dance forms. Introduction to teaching educational modern dance.

(1-3) Cr. 2.

Prereq: DANCE 320
Teaching yoga, body therapies, mindfulness and dance composition to enhance the physical and mental performance of the individual.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: 6 credits in dance and permission of coordinator
Independent study of problems or areas of interest in dance.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in dance and permission of coordinator
Independent study of problems or areas of interest in dance.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 6 credits in dance and permission of coordinator
Independent study of problems or areas of interest in dance for those admitted to the honors program.

Health Studies Courses

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

(1-2) Cr. 2. F.S.SS.


Discussion and application of the basic techniques of utilizing bloodborne pathogen safety measures, administering first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. ARC layperson certification available.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Physical, mental, emotional and social aspects of health as a basis for understanding and promoting health, and preventing poor health conditions. Study of personal responsibility on the long-term benefits of maintaining a high level of wellness and health. Identification and mitigation of negative lifestyle habits.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: PSYCH 101 or PSYCH 230
Discussion of use, abuse and addiction of mood modifying substances in contemporary society. Includes study of tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: HD FS 102 or HD FS 226
The application of instructional strategies related to health education and physical education for teachers at the elementary level. Credit for both H S 275 and 375 may not be applied toward graduation.

(Cross-listed with KIN). Cr. 1-2. F.S.

Prereq: Kinesiology and Health major and permission of internship coordinator.
Pre-internship experience with a health organization based on option. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 1. Repeatable, maximum of 3 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 2nd semester freshmen, sophomores and permission from instructor.
Study under supervision of faculty.

(1-2) Cr. 2. F.S.

Prereq: H S 105
Discussion and practice of skills needed to teach first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. ARC certification available.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: H S 110
Introduction to community health problems, programs of prevention, environmental health agencies, and health services. Study of local, state, and national community health agencies, their purposes and functions.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: H S 110 and BIOL 255, BIOL 256
Discussion of disease process and ill-health in the twentieth century. Emphasis on epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and the understanding of the etiology of communicable and noncommunicable diseases.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: H S 105, H S 110, H S 215
Principles, methods, materials, and resources involved in the teaching of health. Includes organization and development of the health education curriculum (K-12). Credit for both H S 275 and 375 may not be applied toward graduation.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 258, KIN 366
The design and implementation of worksite health promotion programs and the benefits these programs have for both employees and employers. Review of various health risk appraisals and planning theory-based incentive programs designed to promote positive lifestyles.

(Cross-listed with KIN). Cr. 0.5. F.S.

Prereq: Junior classification; to be taken minimum of two semesters prior to required internship.
Preparation of relevant material for a successful internship/career search. Specific internship timeline, process, procedures will be reviewed.

Cr. 16. F.S.

Prereq: H S 375
Students must be fully admitted to Teacher Education and must apply for approval to enroll at the beginning of the semester prior to registering.

Cr. arr. F.S.

Prereq: H S 375
Students must be fully admitted to Teacher Education and must apply for approval to enroll at the beginning of the semester prior to registering.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.


Techniques of needs assessment, program design, administration, and evaluation of community health education programs in various settings.

(Dual-listed with H S 564). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 358 or H S 350; STAT 101 or STAT 587.
Understanding health benefits of physical activity on chronic disease prevention and health promotion throughout the life span, from clinical and public health perspectives. Discussion and application of real-life physical activity assessment, research, guidelines, and promotion in population levels.

Cr. 8-16.

Prereq: Senior classification and advanced registration.
Advance registration required. Supervised experience in health related agencies. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 8-16. F.S.SS.

Prereq: All required courses and C- or better in HS 310 and HS 430. Kinesiology and Health majors only. Cumulative GPA 2.0.
Observation and practice in selected community and public health agencies. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 8-16. F.S.SS.

Prereq: All required courses and C- or better in KIN 458 and KIN 467. Kinesiology and Health majors only. Cumulative GPA 2.0.
Observation and practice in selected physical activity and health promotion agencies. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: 6 credits in health studies and permission of coordinator

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduates:

(Dual-listed with H S 464). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 358 or H S 350; STAT 101 or STAT 587.
Understanding health benefits of physical activity on chronic disease prevention and health promotion throughout the life span, from clinical and public health perspectives. Discussion and application of real-life physical activity assessment, research, guidelines, and promotion in population levels.

Kinesiology Courses

Courses primarily for undergraduates:

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Basic course for nonswimmers. Emphasis on two fundamental strokes and personal water safety skills. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 101 or equivalent skill
Intermediate course. Emphasis on learning and improving five basic strokes and personal water safety skills. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 102 or equivalent skill
Water related exercises, activities, and swimming workouts to improve physical fitness. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Introduction to fundamental badminton skills and strategic game play. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Introduction to bowling skills and strategic game play. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Introduction to fundamental golf skills and strategic game play. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Introduction to fundamental racquetball skills and strategic game play. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Introduction to fundamental ice skating skills and strategic game play. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Introduction to basic skills (forehand, backhand, service) and basic knowledge of game play. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Evaluation of fitness status. Exercises, activities, and programs to improve physical fitness. Improve physical fitness and weight control. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only. Credit for only KIN 163 or 258 may be applied toward graduation.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Fitness walking as an activity to improve health and fitness; values of this type of activity as a lifetime endeavor with knowledge and usage of pedometers. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Running as a physical activity to improve physical fitness and health. Promotion of this activity as a lifetime endeavor. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Introduction to fundamental skills of weight training and strategic game play. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.


Fundamentals of self defense, focusing on throwing with the hands, hips and feet as well as applying pins, chokes and arm-bars. The physical skills will be taught focused on training through development of courtesy, integrity, perseverance, self control, & indomitable spirit. Emphasis on learning a way of life that promotes personal development, physical health and citizenship. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.


Teaches fundamentals of self-defense, focusing on hand and foot striking and blocking techniques. The physical skills will be taught focused on training through development of courtesy, integrity, perseverance, self-control and indomitable spirit. It will be emphasized that each student learns a way of life that promotes personal development, physical health and citizenship. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.


Teaches advanced application of self-defense focusing on hand and foot striking and blocking techniques. The physical skills will be taught focused on training through development of courtesy, integrity, perseverance, self-control and indomitable spirit. It will be emphasized that each student learns a way of life that promotes personal development, physical health and citizenship. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.


Teaches fundamentals of self-defense focusing on joint locks, pressure points and throwing techniques to escape from an attacker. The physical skills will be taught focused on training through development of courtesy, integrity, perseverance, self-control and indomitable spirit. It will be emphasized that each student learns a way of life that promotes personal development, physical health & citizenship. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Introduction to fundamental volleyball skills and strategic game play. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.


Introduction to fundamental soccer skills and strategic game play. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(2-0) Cr. 2. F.S.


Coverage of behavioral skills needed to adopt and maintain lifestyles conducive to fitness and wellness. Provides students with knowledge and skills needed to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles. Includes self-assessments and content on physical activity, nutrition, weight control, stress management and other lifestyle behaviors related to health. For non-kinesiology majors.

Cr. 1. Repeatable, maximum of 2 credits. S.

Prereq: Freshman Classification
Service learning with practical experience in school research focused on promoting physical activity and wellness in youth. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Eligibility for admission to KIN teacher education program
Fundamentals of tumbling and gymnastics apparatus. Skill enhancement, analysis, understanding practice and the development of progressions.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.

Prereq: Eligibility for admission to KIN teacher education program
Fundamentals of indoor and outdoor team sports, for example basketball, volleyball, flag football, and soccer. Skill enhancement, analysis, understanding practice and the development of progressions.

(0-3) Cr. 1. S.

Prereq: Eligibility for admission to KIN teacher education program
Fundamentals of individual sports and fitness, for example disc golf, bowling, badminton, and weight training. Skill enhancement, analysis, understanding practice and the development of progressions.

Cr. 0.5. F.S.

Prereq: KIN H major in PHP option with sophomore status or above.
Exploration of various health fields to clarify career goals and prepare a parallel career plan outside of medicine. Facilitate preparation of relevant materials for professional and graduate school admission. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.


Overview of the various disciplines and professions that comprise the field of Kinesiology (the study of human movement) and help students determine the career option that best fits their interests.

(1-0) Cr. 1. F.S.

Prereq: Concurrent enrollment or credit in KIN 252
Overview of ISU policies and procedures, academic advising operations, degree requirements, program of study planning, and campus resources. Students will have out-of-class activities and work with faculty, staff and mentors to explore careers in Kinesiology and complete assignments related to identification & development of their skills and interests. Department of Kinesiology students only. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(1-3) Cr. 2. F.S.


Introduction to five components of fitness: cardiorespiratory, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Students will be introduced to basic exercise prescription and evaluation principles, develop skills to assess each component of fitness, and learn different exercise modalities to enhance each component. Credit for only one of the following courses may be applied toward graduation: KIN 163, 258.

(2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 258
Development of exercise leadership skills for a variety of activities. Includes planning, promotion, and teaching techniques for developing fitness in others using a variety of exercise modalities including group fitness and weight training. Kinesiology and health majors only.

(1-2) Cr. 2. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 258
This course is designed to enhance the student's current level of knowledge and expertise to an advanced level in the area of strength training and conditioning. The course will prepare students interested in taking the National Strength and Conditioning Association Certified and Conditioning Specialist's exam. The course will focus on the assessment and implementation of training programs with strong emphasis on the areas of resistance training, metabolic training, flexibility, reaction time, speed, and agility. Kinesiology and health majors only and permission of instructor needed.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.


Observing, planning, and facilitating movement experiences of children in an elementary school setting. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.

Prereq: Admission to Educator Preparation Program
Observing, planning, and facilitating movement experiences of students in a middle and/or high school setting. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.

Prereq: Admission to Educator Preparation Program
Planning and facilitating physical education experiences for children in a community outreach setting. Experiences take place on campus. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(2-3) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: 3 credits in human development and family studies
Approaches to teaching movement skills, health-related fitness and school-based physical activities (in the classroom, in PE, during recess) to pre-school and elementary school age children are covered. Emphasis is placed on planning and conducting developmentally appropriate movement experiences for preschool and elementary aged children throughout the school day based upon educational psychology, exercise psychology and motor development research. Practical experience is provided. Credit in only one of the following courses may be applied toward graduation: KIN 284, 312.

(Cross-listed with H S). Cr. 1-2. F.S.

Prereq: Kinesiology and Health major and permission of internship coordinator.
Pre-internship experience with a health organization based on option. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 1. Repeatable, maximum of 3 credits. F.S.

Prereq: 2nd semester freshmen, sophomores and permission from instructor.
Study under supervision of faculty.

(2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Admission to Educator Preparation Program, KIN 280
Planning for management and instruction of developmentally appropriate physical education for children pre-school through grade six. Laboratory experience required. Credit for only one of KIN 284 or KIN 312 may be applied toward graduation.

(2-3) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Admission to Educator Preparation Program, KIN 281
Current theory, practice and research on teaching focusing on management, instructional, and learning styles of students in secondary schools.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.


Study in the theory, ethics, strategy, and mechanics of coaching various interscholastic and/or intercollegiate sports. Emphasis on formulating a philosophy, identifying goals and psychological aspects, teaching skills, and developing strategies.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.


Application of management concepts to the fitness industry, e.g., understanding customers, marketing, program management, financial management, legal issues, and evaluation and planning.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: PHYS 111 or PHYS 115
Mechanical basis of human performance; application of mechanical principles to exercise, sport and other physical activities.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: BIOL 255, BIOL 255L, BIOL 256 and BIOL 256L
Physiological basis of human performance; effects of physical activity on body functions.

(0-2) Cr. 1. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in KIN 358
Learning lab techniques in Exercise Physiology and engaging in the experimental process.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: SOC 134
Provide an overview of sociology to enhance students understanding of societal forces influencing behavior; Provide insights about people, environments, organization and policies that impact Kinesiology professionals.

(2-0) Cr. 2. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.


Understanding of human electrocardiography, including normal and abnormal 12-lead ECGs and arrhythmia identification.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: PSYCH 101 or PSYCH 230
Psychological factors that influence performance in sport settings. The influence of personality, anxiety, motivation and social factors. Psychological skills training and strategic methods for improvement of athletic performance.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: PSYCH 101 or PSYCH 230
Psychological theories for understanding and predicting health-oriented exercise behavior. Psychological and psychobiological responses to exercise. Psychological interventions for increasing exercise participation and adherence rates.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS.

Prereq: PSYCH 101 or PSYCH 230, BIOL 255, BIOL 256
Introduction to major concepts of neuromotor control, behavioral motor control and motor learning in the child, adult and older adult, with emphasis on the adult system.

Cr. 1. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: Undergraduate student majoring in either Kinesiology and Health or Athletic Training, sophomore status or higher, minimum GPA of 2.5 and having completed KIN 252 and 258 by the end of the current spring semester.
Prepares student for a study abroad experience focused on the discipline of Kinesiology in another country. Precedes a multi-credit KIN 381B course that is the actual study abroad experience. The prerequisite for this course is having been accepted to study abroad by the Program Director of your intended program. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

Cr. 2. Alt. SS., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: Having been accepted to study abroad by the Program Director and passing the relevant KIN 381A.
First-person perspective into the discipline of Kinesiology in another country as well as provide enrichment experiences related to the history and culture of that country. Follows a 1 credit KIN 381A course that was intended to prepare you for this study abroad experience. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.
Meets International Perspectives Requirement.

(Cross-listed with H S). Cr. 0.5. F.S.

Prereq: Junior classification; to be taken minimum of two semesters prior to required internship.
Preparation of relevant material for a successful internship/career search. Specific internship timeline, process, procedures will be reviewed.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.


Applied service learning experiences designed to provide students with opportunities to apply classroom knowledge to real world applications. Students will gain professional skills and programming experience while supporting health, education and wellness programming in school, work site or community settings. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(Dual-listed with KIN 595). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Admission to Educator Preparation Program, KIN 280/281
Etiology, characteristics, needs, and movement experiences for individuals with disabilities. Designed to provide appropriate methods of physical education instruction for students including those with disabilities as identified by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and students who are talented and gifted. Assessments and strategies to differentiate instruction and to adapt activities for all exceptional learners will be addressed. Laboratory experience required. KIN 595 may not be taken by students who previously earned credit in KIN 395.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: SOC 134
The role of sport in developing fitness, recreational opportunities, and tourism, with special emphasis on issues related to youth sport, volunteerism, and the marketing of sport events and facilities.

Cr. arr. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 281, KIN 282, KIN 313, KIN 355, KIN 395, KIN 471, KIN 475; admission to Teacher Education; approval before enrolling in the course.
Supervised teaching in the secondary schools.

Cr. 8. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 280, KIN 282, KIN 312, KIN 355, KIN 395, KIN 471, KIN 475. Students must be fully admitted to Teacher Education and must apply for approval to enroll at the beginning of the semester prior to registering
Supervised teaching in the elementary schools.

(3-0) Cr. 3. S.


Students will understand legal concepts and terminology relevant to sport/activity, identify strategies for limiting liability in sport/fitness programs, and identify solutions for elimination of discriminatory practices in sport and physical activity.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: KIN 355 or permission of instructor
Examination of biomechanics and kinesiology research literature to evaluate the application of mechanical principles and analyses to human movement in exercise, sport, physical activity, and activities of daily living and to assess research outcomes and their implications for motor performance, movement energetic, musculoskeletal loading, and injury.

(3-2) Cr. 4. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 258, KIN 358
Principles of cardiac risk factor identification and modification; risk classification of potential exercise clients; fitness assessments; developing comprehensive exercise prescriptions for individuals.

(0-3) Cr. 1. F.S.

Prereq: C- or better in KIN 259, CPR certification, concurrent enrollment in KIN 458
Observation and practice of exercise leadership techniques in an on-campus adult fitness program.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 358
The role of exercise in preventive medicine. Impact of exercise on various diseases, and the effect of various medical conditions on the ability to participate in vigorous exercise and competitive sports. Principles of exercise testing and prescription for individuals with these conditions. Environmental and nutritional aspects of exercise.

(Dual-listed with KIN 567). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: Introductory course with emphasis on exercise psychology (i.e., KIN 366 or equivalent)
Advanced analysis of theoretical health behavior models and their application to physical activity behavior. Includes practical techniques, tools and interventions (e.g., counseling skills, motivational interviewing) to enhance exercise prescription and motivation, and considerations for working with special populations.

(Dual-listed with KIN 571). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Admission to Educator Preparation Program, KIN 280 and KIN 281
Current theory, practice and research on measurement and evaluation in physical education and youth physical activity settings. Statistics, grading, and specific assessments including fitness, motor skill, sport skill, physical activity, affective, and cognitive testing will be addressed. KIN 571 may not be taken by students who previously earned credit in KIN 471.

(Dual-listed with KIN 572). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 372 or PSYCH 310
Addresses the role of the central nervous system in the control of voluntary human movement, with the focus on the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Content organized around specific nervous system damage (such as stroke, apraxia, spasticity, or spinal cord damage) and functional movements (such as reaching and grasping, balance and gait). Converging evidence from human movement disorders, brain imaging, animal lesion and single cell studies provide the primary basis for the content.

Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: KIN 355 or KIN 358 or KIN 372
Understanding the physiological, behavioral, and cognitive changes associated with aging with focus on the effects of physical activity on the aging human system. Discussions of what it means to become older, what a person can expect during the aging process, and what kind of control a person has over the aging process.

(Dual-listed with KIN 575). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Admission to Educator Preparation Program, KIN 280 and 281
Current theory, practices and principles applied to curriculum development for programs in physical education, K-12. Organizing for teaching in a variety of school settings.

(3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 355; BIOL 155 or BIOL 255 and BIOL 256
The structure and function of human muscular, skeletal and nervous systems. The relationship of these systems to efficient and safe human motion.

(0-2) Cr. 1.

Prereq: KIN 355
Learning lab techniques in Biomechanics and engaging in the experimental process.

(0-2) Cr. 1.

Prereq: KIN 366
Learning lab techniques in Exercise Psychology and engaging in the experimental process.

(0-2) Cr. 1.

Prereq: KIN 372
Learning lab techniques in Motor Control and engaging in the experimental process.

Cr. 8-16.

Prereq: Senior classification and advance registration.
Observation and practice in exercise/fitness agencies. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 8-16.

Prereq: Prereq: All required courses and C- or better in KIN 458, KIN 459 and KIN 462, Kinesiology and Health majors only. Cumulative GPA 2.0.
Observation and practice in selected exercise science agencies. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 8-16.

Prereq: Senior classification and advance registration.
Observation and practice in exercise/fitness agencies. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: 6 credits from KIN advanced core and permission of coordinator
Independent study of problems of areas of interest in exercise and sport science and related areas.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits.

Prereq: 6 credits from KIN advanced core and permission of coordinator
Independent study of problems of areas of interest in exercise and sport science and related areas.

Cr. 1-2. Repeatable, maximum of 4 credits.

Prereq: 6 credits from KIN advanced core and permission of coordinator
Independent study of problems of areas of interest in exercise and sport science and related areas.

Cr. 1-2. Repeatable, maximum of 6 credits. F.S.

Prereq: Junior/Senior status and permission of instructor
This supervised practicum course is designed for students interested in learning how to conduct ‘motivational interviewing’ for behavior change and health coaching applications. Students will learn strategies of motivational interviewing and have opportunities to practice applying these skills with adult clients. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 1. F.S.SS.

Prereq: Junior/Senior status and permission of instructor
Introduction to the principles of ‘motivational interviewing’ for behavior change and health coaching applications. Students interested in gaining practical experience in health coaching should enroll in the associated practicum course (KIN 494B). Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 1-2. Repeatable, maximum of 5 credits. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 494A Permission of Instructor
This supervised practicum course is designed for students interested in gaining experience in applying ‘motivational interviewing’ strategies in behavior change and health coaching applications. Students will have opportunities to practice motivational interviewing skills with adult clients and receive on-going support and assistance needed to refine their skills. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Cr. 1-3.

Prereq: Junior or Senior classification
Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Courses primarily for graduate students, open to qualified undergraduates:

(3-0) Cr. 3. Repeatable.

Prereq: Graduate classification in kinesiology and health
Methods and techniques used in the design and interpretation of research involving physical activity. Emphasis on styles of writing, library use, and computer applications.

(0-4) Cr. 2.

Prereq: KIN 358 or equivalent course with basic laboratory experience
Application and use of laboratory research equipment in exercise physiology, including operation, calibration, and use in selected situations.

(2-0) Cr. 2.

Prereq: KIN 358
The role of exercise in preventive medicine. Impact of exercise on various diseases, and the effect of various medical conditions on the ability to participate in vigorous exercise and competitive sports. Principles of exercise testing and prescription for individuals with these conditions.

Cr. 3.


Provide adequate opportunities to develop a more in-depth understanding of (a) the challenges in youth physical activity (PA), (b) the relevant theoretical models that are popular in youth PA, (c) the strategies that can be implemented to promote PA in youth.

(2-2) Cr. 3. F.


Planning for management and instruction of developmentally appropriate physical education for children pre-school through grade six. Laboratory experience required. Emphasis on evaluating published research on physical education and school-wide physical activity.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: KIN 355 or permission of instructor.
Utilization of biomechanical principles to model injury mechanisms. Introduction to tissue mechanics of bone, articular cartilage, ligament, tendon, muscle, and nerve. Biomechanics of lower extremity, upper extremity, and head/neck/trunk injuries.

(3-1) Cr. 3.

Prereq: KIN 355
Application of the principles of mechanics to the analysis of human motion. Investigation of the effects of kinematics and kinetics on the human body with special emphasis on exercise and sport applications. Includes consideration of two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging techniques and force measurements.

(3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years.

Prereq: KIN 355 or permission from instructor
Systematic problem-solving approaches and design of computer programs for biomechanical analyses. Estimation of anthropometric parameters and mechanical properties of muscles, bones, and joints. Integration of anthropometrics, kinematics, EMG, and muscle mechanics into simulations of human movement.

(0-8) Cr. 8. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 512, KIN 570, KIN 575
Student teaching for 8 weeks in an elementary school.

(0-8) Cr. 8. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 512, KIN 570, KIN 575
Student teaching for 8 weeks in a middle or high school.

(3-0) Cr. 3.

Prereq: KIN 365 or KIN 366, 3 courses in psychology; open to majors only or by permission of instructor
Aspects of psychology which form a basis for understanding and explaining behavior in the context of exercise and sport. Emphasis on evaluating published research, particularly theory and research methodology. Student presentations.

(Cross-listed with AN S, NUTRS). (4-0) Cr. 4. F.

Prereq: recommended: an undergraduate physiology course and a biochemistry course
Overview of mammalian physiology. Cell biology, endocrinology, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, digestive, skeletal muscle and reproductive systems.

(2-3) Cr. 3.

Prereq: KIN 505
Concepts and methods of assessing neurological, muscular, cardiovascular, and respiratory adjustments to exercise.

(2-3) Cr. 3.

Prereq: KIN 505
Analysis of factors affecting work capacity and performance. Human energy metabolism concepts and measurement.

(Cross-listed with AN S, NUTRS). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: BIOL 335; credit or enrollment in BBMB 404 or BBMB 420
Cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and digestive physiology.

(2-3) Cr. 3.

Prereq: KIN 358
Physiological principles of physical fitness, design and administration of fitness programs; testing, evaluation, and prescription; electrocardiogram interpretation.

(2-3) Cr. 3.

Prereq: KIN 372
Theoretical perspectives of motor control and learning will be examined as well as factors that facilitate motor learning. Motor control and learning will also be addressed by studying functional tasks such as reach and grasp, posture and locomotor, handwriting, catching and/or speech.

(2-0) Cr. 2-3.

Prereq: PSYCH 230
Addresses theories and underlying mechanisms of motor development and motor control applied to typically and atypically developing children. Developmental control of balance, locomotion, reach-to-grasp, and other functional skills will be discussed, as will the role of physical activity in a child's life.

(Dual-listed with KIN 467). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: Introductory course with emphasis on exercise psychology (i.e., KIN 366 or equivalent)
Advanced analysis of theoretical health behavior models and their application to physical activity behavior. Includes practical techniques, tools and interventions (e.g., counseling skills, motivational interviewing) to enhance exercise prescription and motivation, and considerations for working with special populations.

(2-2) Cr. 3.


This course will cover the broad scope of research in physical activity and public health. Emphasis will be placed on the application of physical activity assessment techniques since accurate measures are needed to more accurately assess the health benefits from physical activity and to evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral interventions designed to promote physical activity.

(Dual-listed with KIN 471). (3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: Admission to Educator Preparation Program, KIN 280 and KIN 281
Current theory, practice and research on measurement and evaluation in physical education and youth physical activity settings. Statistics, grading, and specific assessments including fitness, motor skill, sport skill, physical activity, affective, and cognitive testing will be addressed. KIN 571 may not be taken by students who previously earned credit in KIN 471.

(Dual-listed with KIN 472). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.

Prereq: KIN 372 or PSYCH 310
Addresses the role of the central nervous system in the control of voluntary human movement, with the focus on the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Content organized around specific nervous system damage (such as stroke, apraxia, spasticity, or spinal cord damage) and functional movements (such as reaching and grasping, balance and gait). Converging evidence from human movement disorders, brain imaging, animal lesion and single cell studies provide the primary basis for the content.

(Dual-listed with KIN 475). (3-0) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Admission to Educator Preparation Program, KIN 280 and 281
Current theory, practices and principles applied to curriculum development for programs in physical education, K-12. Organizing for teaching in a variety of school settings.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable.


Cr. 1-6.

Prereq: 10 graduate credits in kinesiology and/or related areas
Supervised on-the-job field experience in special areas.

Cr. 1-6.

Prereq: 10 graduate credits in kinesiology and/or related areas
Supervised on-the-job field experience in special areas.

Cr. 1-6.

Prereq: 10 graduate credits in kinesiology and/or related areas
Supervised on-the-job field experience in special areas.

Cr. 1-6.

Prereq: 10 graduate credits in kinesiology and/or related areas
Supervised on-the-job field experience in special areas.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable, maximum of 3 credits. F.S.SS.


Supervised experience with teaching an upper division, classroom-based course. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

(Dual-listed with KIN 395). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.

Prereq: Admission to Educator Preparation Program, KIN 280/281
Etiology, characteristics, needs, and movement experiences for individuals with disabilities. Designed to provide appropriate methods of physical education instruction for students including those with disabilities as identified by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and students who are talented and gifted. Assessments and strategies to differentiate instruction and to adapt activities for all exceptional learners will be addressed. Laboratory experience required. KIN 595 may not be taken by students who previously earned credit in KIN 395.

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable.


Courses for graduate students:

Cr. 1-3. Repeatable.


(3-0) Cr. 3. S.

Prereq: KIN 501, STAT 402 and STAT 587. Doctoral students only
Culminating seminar designed to synthesize statistical and design courses with practical research issues using data from physical activity.

(Cross-listed with AN S). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years.

Prereq: BBMB 405, BBMB 420
Ultrastructure of muscle; chemistry, structure, function, and molecular biology of muscle proteins. Molecular aspects of muscle contraction, development and turnover. Cytoskeletal proteins and dynamics.

Cr. 1-6. Repeatable.